Thomas J. Divine Letters
 

These wonderful letters were contributed to the Civil War site and for the Izard County website, by Donnie Piccard

Thomas J. Divine Letter - Cassville, Mo., November 17, 1862
Cassville, Mo.
November 17th, 1862

Dear Brother,
I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that we are all well at this time ever hoping when these few lines come to hand they may find you enjoying the same state of health.  I have nothing of importance to write to you.
Paps says he wants you to ge the sheep up and if you cannot do it by yourself to hire somebody to help you and be sure to get them;  and if Eglentine has not got well he wants to know it, and if she has, you need not write to us unless some of the rest of the family are sick and very low.
You must not fail to get the sheep.  Whatever be saving of your feed and take good care of the stock.
I have wrote some letters to that part of the country and I have not received any answers yet and I donít care.
If any of you are sick you must get some one to write soon and direct your letter to Springfield, Mo. Company E, 14th Div.  M.S.M., S. H. Julian, Captain Comdg. Company, 14th Cav. M. S. M.  J. M. Richardson, Col. Comdg.  Regt.
Thomas J. Divine
To Radford C. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter - Cassville, Missouri, February 12 1863
Capsville, Missouri
Febr. 12, 1863

Dear Mother and all inquiring friends,

It is with pleasure I take my pen in hand to let you know we are well at this time, ever hoping these few lines may find you enjoying the same health.  We have nothing of importance to write to you at this time.
The weather is very unpleasant here at this time.  The streets are very shoe mouth deep in Cassville a this time and that makes it very unpleasant.
One thing I have to write you that may render you very unhappy, although I hope not.  I have been under arrest for two days.  The courts martial has ......three times and adjourned.  I guess when they meet again they will decide the case.  I suppose the charge is for shooting a cow.  They have not proved ...yet.  I will let you know when it is decided.
You must write to us as soon as you get this letter and let me know how ...bush whackers are getting along.  You must turn the horses out of a day and let them run out, but put them up at night.
Old Kit took the blind staggers the other day and like to died and I gave her to Pap.  She is getting well now.  I reckon that I will not take Lucy to ...in the service, I will draw a government horse.
When you write to me you must direct your letter to Cassville, Mo. Co. B.
14th Regt. Cav. M.S.M.
So nothing more at this time only remains your affectionate son until death.
Thomas J. Divine
To Mrs. Jamimah Divine
Dadeville, Missouri
Dade County
Direct your letter to T. J. Divine, Cassville, Missouri, Company E, 14th
Reg. Cav. M.S.M.

Thomas J. Divine Letter - Cassville, Missouri, April 22, 1863

Newtonia, Mo.
April 22, 1863

Dear Mother,

I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and father is well and ever hoping these few lines may find your enjoying the same blessing of health. I just got in last night off of a five day scout.  We started out on the 17th instant with twenty five men under comdg. of 1st Lt. Akard, and on the 18th we had a little fight on Center Creek with about 30 Rebels and we made them retreat on quick time.  No loss on our side.  We wounded their Colonelís horse and got his saddle and bridle.  I donít know whether we killed any of them or not.  They left a good double barrel shot gun on the battlefield and one pair of crutches to boot.  But one thing that surprised me more than all,  we was on the same ground yesterday and in one half mile or closer we jumped a couple of ladies.  One of them I think I knew her.  The other one I did not.  One of them was K. W. Westís wife and you can guess at the two next letters of her name.  It was Miz Sealy Cox.

I want you to write me as soon as you can and tell me what is going on in Dade.  I did not receive but one letter since I come to this place and that was from Eglentine (his sister) and if you have wrote me any letters I guess they will never come for the mail was taken by the Bush  Whackers last Sunday between here and Mt. Vernon and two boys from this Co. was carrying it and they have not come in yet.  Lt. Wakefield is out on search of them today, and if they are found dead then some (word is unintelligible) pay for the rest.

If you know anything about who K. W. and Graham taken from Dad with them I would like to know.  Miz Cox said they was hunting cows and she said K. W.  was wounded a week ago and she did not know where he was.  But she canít play off me in telling such tales as that.
Let me know something about Jessie M. B. and what he is doing.  I will come to a close as I have nothing more to say only remains your son till death.
T. J. Divine
To Jamimah Divine

The R. C. Divine (Radford) to whom this letter was written is the father of Eva Divine Wilson still living in Dade Co. and the late Otis, Frank, Vernie, Ira, Charley and John Divine; also Lula Hembree and another daughter whose name was Ethel I believe.  The Mary he mentions was his youngest sister - my grandmother.  She is the M. E. Divine also mentioned in the list to whom the letter was sent.
Reba Neill McMurry

Thomas J. Divine Letter -  Newtonia, Mo April 24, 1863

Dear Brother,

I have the opportunity of sending you a few lines which take my pen in hand to write to you now to let you know that we are well at present.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you enjoying good health.  I would like to
see you very well but donít know when that will be, though not long I hope.  You must write to me as soon as you.............know what is going on in your settlement, and let me know how you are getting along with your
crop.  If you have not got your corn planted it is time you had it planted.
I have wrote some four or five letters home since I left there and have never received but one from the same.
I do not know at this time how long we will stay at this post.  The 7th M.S.M., one Battalion of it, come to this place yesterday but I donít know whether they did come to relieve us of this place or not, though I hope not for I had ruther stay here than any place I ever have been stationed at since I have been in the service.
Tell Mary I would like to see her first rate for I love her.  If we should be moved from here and you should write me at this place I will show you how to back your letters so they will follow the Regt.
Thomas J. Divine
Newtonia, Mo.
Co. A. 8th Cav.
M.S.M.
So I will close my letter, nothing more only remains your affectionate brother until death.  T. J. Divine.
To R. C. Divine at home ply politeness of Mr. Cantrell
R. C. Divine
A. E. Divine
C.C. Divine
 Matilda C. Divine
 M. E. Divine

Jamimah Divine and all.
Well Mother if you have got the jeans made you may make us a pair of breeches apiece and send them the first chance.  You can send them by Ben Cantrell if you donít send them before he comes back.  And Pap send you one white blanket if he can get Ben to carry it out.  But if it donít come you need not say anything about it.  But write as soon as you can.

Thomas J. Divine Letter - September 27, 1863 Cassville, Mo.
September 27, 1863

Dear Mother, Brother and Sisters,

It is with great pleasure that I, this fine morning, take my seat on the bank of Flat Creek to drop you a few lines to let you know that we are well this morning.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you all enjoying the same blessing of health.  I have nothing of interest to write to you this morning.
Coís A and C left Springfield last Tuesday and arrived here Thursday with paymasters for the Army of the Frontier.  The rest of our battalion will be here this evening and I think we are likely to stay here for sometime.
Well, Radford, if you have seen Bob Dunn and got my pistol from him I want you to give it to Mr. Billy Landers and tell him to keep it till I come to get it.  If  Thomas Stockton comes to the company before I get hold of it why tell him to send it to me by him, and if you did not get it I want you to write immediately to me and tell me what he said to you about it.
Pap says he wants you to be sure and cup up plenty of corn so as  to have plenty of roughness to do you.
I saw Elchany Stockton yesterday and he was well, and I saw Ben Brannom.  He is the head of Spring river about 20 miles from this place.
If you are at any time passing around and should see Sarah Bain tell her that I want her to write, too, and tell her the regiment Elic belongs to is or was at Fort smith when our boys left there.
As I told you in the outset I did not have much to write, I shall close this letter.  You will>


Transfer interrupted!

ble, so nothing more remains.
Your affectionate son and brother till
death,
Thomas J. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter - Cassville, Mo., October the 23rd, 1863

Dear Mother, brother and sisters,

I embrace the present opportunity of dropping you a few lines to let you know that I am well.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you enjoying the same blessing.  I have nothing much to write to you this morning.
I just got in from Fayetteville night before last about midnight.  I think from every appearance that we will be moved to Buffalo before Pap has to come back, and if we find we have to go I will write again.  We will not know till the major comes in.  The most of the battalion is with him and he is with General McNeil enroute for Huntsville, Ark.  McNeil said he would follow Shelby to Ark. River or have a fight with him.
Tell Pap I want him to buy about thirty bushels of good corn for me if he can, and I will settle for when I am paid.
Yesterday was a rough day.  It snowed and rained all day here.  Last night was very cold and  I come very near freezing.  So if you could furnish me with a good pair of mittens when Pap comes back it would be a great accomodation for me, for my hands are chapped coming from Fayetteville and they are so sore I can hardly use them.
Tom Stockton told me that Radford had not got my pistol and Robert Dunn had gone to Kansas with it.  So if he comes back before Pap leaves home I want him to do all he can to get it.  And if Mr. Dunn has gone to Kansas to stay the pistol gone.
So write to me as soon as you get this letter and I will come to close by assigning myself your most obedient son till death.
Thomas J. Divine
To Radford C. Divine and Jamimah Divine and children
Immortal may their memory be
Who fought and died for liberty
From one soldier to Another

Thomas J. Divine Letter - November 3, 1863, Cassville, Mo
Nov. 3rd, 1863

Dear Father,

I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that Major Eno arrived here yesterday and Co. A and Co. I will leave here at 12 oíclock today for Neosho.  Lt. Etter told me just now that we would go to Burlerís Creek from there a distance of twenty-five miles southwest from Neosho.
If you should get this letter before you start to the Co.  you had better come to Mt. Vernon and from there to Newtonia, and then if we have left Neosho, or you cannot hear of us, you had better report at some post till you can have plenty of company to fight your way through the Rebels.
Tis most time the mail was closed and I will have to close this by assigning myself your ever dutiful son.

Thomas J. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter -Marshfield, Webster Co., Mo.
November 22nd, 1863

Dear Mother, brother and sisters,

I take my pen in hand to let you know that we are well and where we are.  Ever hoping these few lines will find you in the same health.
I left Springfield on the night of the 20th instant about nine oíclock.  Traveled all night through the cold, our wagons and tents have just got in and we have pitched our tents and from every appearance I think  we will stay here some time.  This is one hell of a place to stay.  there is about nine stores here and I can carry all they have except the oysters and sardines.  Though I like this place very well and I think it will be a good place to stay.  We have all got good stables for our horses and my pony is doing very well.  She is getting so slick she nearly glistens.
Well Radford I did not write for you to come to Springfield for I did not think we would stay there, and so we did not and I sent my money to Bob Clark by Pharo Cook.  I sent eighty dollars and Pap sent seventy-six dollars.  When you get this letter I want you to have one wrote and mailed to me immediately and let me know whether you got the money or not.  If you did I want you to take ten dollars and spend it as you please, then give the balance to mother and I want her to take good care of it for me till I come home.  And if I should never be so lucky as to come home again, then I want you to have all the money everything that I have.  And Pap says that anthing any of you wants to buy it with his money.
I want you  to dispose of old kit the first opportunity.  Swap her off for something younger or trade her for corn if you donít get forty bushels for......
When you write direct your letter to Marshfield, Webster County, Missouri.  I will bring my kind letter to a close by assigning myself your most affectionate son and brother till death.
Thomas J. Divine
If you did not get the money ask Bob Clark if he heard Pharo Cook say ....thing about it, or of getting robbed by the Bush Whackers as him and  Colo  Williams come from Springfield a few days ago.  To Mrs. Jamimah Divine and children.  Union for ever and ever.

Thomas J. Divine Letter Marshfield, Mo., Nov. 30th, 1863

Mr. R. C. Divine

Dear Brother,

It is with pleasure that I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines in  answer to yours of the 24th instant
which I received yesterday, and to let you know that I am well.  Ever hoping these few lines may find yu enjoying
the same blessing.  I have nothing of importance to write to you this morning.
I am glad to hear that you got the money I sent home.  I have wrote to you since I come to this place and told you what I want you to do.  I was proud to see a letter from you that I could read with so much ease as I could yours.  By a little practice you will make a very good scribe.
Well Radford my pony is getting so nice I can hardly ride her.  I donít think you would hardly know her if you was to see her prance the streets of Marshfield this morning.
I would be very glad to be there to go with you to see the girls, though I cnanot have the privilege of doing so.  Thought that is one thing that never bothers my mind.  There is only one girl in that country that I have any particular love for and I can hear from her as often as I can from home.
Well mother I have lost one of my mittens and I would be very glad if you could furnish me with another pair.  I would like to have a pair of - (word is unintelligable) ones if I could get them and have them sent to me as soon as possible.
I have been on one scout since I came here.  I was at Hartville and the people in that country are as peaceable as I ever saw them in my life.  You may ride up to a wood pile and you find the man chopping wood with his rifle setting by his side.
My pen is so bad I guess you cannot read this letter so I will come to close by assigning myself your most affectionate brother till death.
T. J. Divine
Write to me every week if you please.

Divine Letters, December 14, 1863 Springfield, Mo.
Dec. 14th, 1863

Dear Brother,
I this night seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well. Ever hoping these few lines will find you in good health and spirits.  As to myself I am very much dissatisfied. We are now under marching orders.  We are ordered to Fosythe a little the damdest place now out of hell. Well we have been nearly every place but hell. I donít think soldiers will ever see any harder times in hell than we will see if we go to Forsythe. Though we may not go there. It was the report today that we would go to Bolivar, though I donít think there is any other chance only to go to Forsythe.  I was aiming to come home tomorrow but there is no chance to come now, though I think I will get a furlough in the course of six weeks and if we go to that abomnable hell hole I donít guess you will see or hear from me till I come home for there is no mail runs to that point only messengers and it will be useless to write any more till you hear of us leaving the ....damed hell hole of Forsythe. I want you to take good care of my horse for when I am furloughed I aim to ride him and leave my pony at home.
I guess the bearers hereof canít tell you whether we have gone to Forsythe or not.
It is getting late and I will have to close my letter so nothing more only remains your most affectionate brother till death.  Thomas J. Divine to R. C. Divine Address on envelope:
Mr. Radford C. Divine
Dadeville
Dade County
Missouri

Thomas J. Divine Letter Ozark, Mo., January 10th, 1864

Dear Mother,

I take my pen in hand to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you in good health.  I have nothing of importance to write to you.
I just got to camp yesterday off of a fifteen days scout.  A little the coldest weather that I ever saw.  We left Phenix Mill the 26th day of Dec.  and went from there to Batesville, Ark., and fromthere we scouted nearly all over Izzard County, Ark.  and nearly every one of us are frost bit, and some of the boyís fee bursted.  Ira Jerome is so bad frost bit he will not be able for duty this winter.
We killed four Rebels and captured twenty four and they beat any set of men standing cold I ever saw.
I have not received but one letter from home since I left there, so ou must write to me as soon as you can, though I think I will get a furlough before long.  As I have not much to write I will close.  I had like to forgot I stayed with Jim McTeer night before last.  Pap was not on the scout, though he never slept only last night with his feet.
Nothing more only remains your son till death.
Thomas J. Divine
to Jamimah Divine

Divine Letters - Ozark, Christian County, Mo. Jan 13th, 1864
Ozark Christian County, Mo.

Dear Brother,

It is with pleasure that I this day seat myself to pen you a few lines to let you know that I am well.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you enjoying the same health.
Father is not well.  He has been on the sick report for several days, first with his feet at night, and now he has such a cough he donít sleep scarcely any at night.
Well, Radford, I have seen some very had service since I saw you last.  We left Springfield the 15th day of December and come close to this place where we froze up for several days. Then we moved on to Phenix Mill in Taney County, Mo.  We stayed there for four days when Captain Akard was ordered out with one hundred men and six days rations, which lasted us to Batesville, Ark.  Then we stayed there one night drawed six more days rations, then we started on a scout with some of the first Nebraska boys.  We traveled all night ghrough the rain and snow.  We got to Looningburg about day light.  It wa reported to be four hundred Rebels there.  The first Nebraska had went ahead of us and built up fires all over town and when I got in sight of the town and saw the fires there I thought we had found the Rebels, and I begun to fix to get my pistols and  my overcoat was froze so stiff I could not begin to unbutton a single button.
We stayed there till about 3 oíclock when the Rebels got after some of our scouts and we had to saddle our horses and ride three miles and back.   A little the coldest weather I ever saw and every one of us got frost bit.  We had to as long as a day and a half twice without horse feed.  Some of the boys got their feet frosted till they bursted open.  Mine did not burst though they are very sore.
We taken twenty four Confederate soldieers prisioners and killed four.
Well Mother old Bob McTier is here in camp today.  He is well.  His wife is dead and his daughter is dead.  Pap saw Old Aster Bainís Bill yesterday.  He is well.  His son Rufus is in the Rebel Army.  James Moses, that married a sister to Mrs. McTier is dead.  He was a Rebel and was killed on the 22nd day of June last by a Union man.  His wife lives in five miles of this place.
Well Radford I expect to get a furlough now before long and I want you to feed my horse good for me till I come home, for I want to ride him and leave my pony at home.
I have nothing more to write that will interest you so you must write to me as soon as possible.  So nothing more at present only remains your brother and sincere friend till death.
T. J. Divine
To R. C. Divine, Mother and sisters and all inquiring friends.

Thomas J. Divine Letter-At Home - March the 4th, 1864
Mr. W. W. Divine

Dear Father,

I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I arrived home yesterday and found all well.  Hoping these few lines may find you well.  I have nothing of importance to write to you more than I found Radford in the field plowing, your horse is in but very little better fix than he was when I carried him from Neosho with all I can do I canít get him in fix to ride back, so I am going to put him and Radfordís horse to plowing, as one of the steers are sick.  I will put your mare and mine together and start two plows Monday if the weather will admit of it, and if not, so soon as possible.
We will not have corn enough to do us through.  I will try to buy some the first opportunity.
I will ride the horse that I got from James Bo when I come to the Company.  I want you to take the very best care of my horse you can.
Sarah E. Bain received three letters from Elic.  One dated the 26th of January.  He was well and may write to me before I come back.
I will again when I get the plows started, so nothing only remains your son till death.
Thomas J. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter March 10, 1864

I embrace this opportunity to drop you a few lines to let yu know that I am well.  Hoping when these lines come to hand they may find you all in good health.
I would not have wrote so soon but I want my mare to stay at home if I can.  So I will give my horse for your horse if you like.  You know them both and take your choice and write to me soon about it, and if not bring my mare back.
I would have got to come home the other pay day but I was on guard.  I think I will come before long.  I want to see you all very bad and little sweet Mary.
So no more at this time only remains your father till death.
W. W. Divine
To T. J. Divine and family

Write to me about all concerned.
They say that the pay master will be here the 15th.  If he comes I will write forthwith.








Thomas J. Divine Letter Springfield, Mo
April 10th 1864

Mr. R. C. Divine

Dear Brother,

I with pleasure embrace the present opportunity fo writing you a few lines to let you know that we are well.  Ever hoping these few lines may reach you in due time and find all enjoying the same blessing of health.  I have nothing strange to write to you at this time.
We are still here and expect to remain here for some time.  I got here on Wednesday after I left home.  The order for us to go to Bolivar was countermanded and a number of the boys are gone to Akansas with the pay master.  I did not get here in time to get my money.  W. W. D. got his money though he has no chance to send or bring it home though I think he will in a few days.
I want you to go and see Mr. Cook and tell him I want that money and if he donít pay it I will have to push hiim for it.  I expect the corn is out and if it is, go to Mr. Hobbs and buy some more if you can and tell him he shall have the money as soon as Pap can send it home.
So nothing more only remains as ever your affectionate brother until death.
T. J. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter Springfield, Mo.
June 20, 1864
 

Dear Brother,

I seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that we are well.  Ever hoping these few lines may reach you in due time and find all enjoying the same blessing of health.
I was very sorry to hear of Melville (Dadeville) being burned, as much sorrier to hear of the murder that was committed there.  I was equally as glad to hear of six of them going up the next day.
Well brother I have had some trouble since I left home, hunting horses.  I lost your horse on Sunday after I left home.  He was gone till Tuesday. He left me then on Thursday, then I found him on Tuesday 14 miles from this place, then I come to camp and started on Thursday again to look for the old black mare.  I found her on Friday 35 miles north east of here.  So that ends the horse hunting to the present time with me.
Well Captain Akard and some of our boys run two little horse races last Saturday with the 6th M.S.M.  One for one hundred and the other for three hundred.  They lost the last race and won the other.  The horses that ran was Old Ben and Honest Tom, and the boy and old Gullivar.  The boy lost his race by five feet.  Old Ben won his by ten.
When I left home I made no other calculations only to find a letter here for me from home, instead of that I have not received the 1st scrawl of a pen from any of you, though I will look for one very soon from some of you.  When you write give me the particulars concerning the Rebels for I am sometimes afraid they will hold (?) that country again, for now at this time there is more rotten hearted Rebels in our lines than should be permitted to stay, and the further north the worst for according to the reports in the papers it is a matter of imposibility for a soldier or a small detachment of soldiers to get outside their camp lines, for if they do they are gobbled up by the rebels, and this will be the case so long as they are permitted to live amongst us, or to go North.  So for all those reasons I would advise you to be very careful of the company you keep, not to stay nor talk with Rebels nor Rebel sympathizers.
Write to me soon as you get this letter.  So nothing more only remains your brother till death.
Thomas J. Divine
To R. C. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter Springfield, Mo.
July 11th, 1864

Mrs. Jamimah Divine
Dadeville, Mo.

Dear Mother,
I seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I am not very well.  Ever hoping these few lines may find you all enjoying the best of health.  I have nothing of great importance to write to you only I have received two letters from Tenn., since I left home, and I will send them to you in this letter.
Pap is in very good health.  He is a regular cook.  He rises of morning before the stars disappears and has his breakfast bright and early then begins to rear and charge and tells the boys if they want anything to eat they must get up.
I have not been very well for several days though I have not went on the sick list yet and I donít think I will have to go.
When I left home it looked very much like rain, though it did not rain very much here not more than would cleverly lay the dust, and the people in this secrtion are needing rain very bad.
Tell Radford that I have offered to sell his horse though I donít think I come much speed for the horse traders tell me that they donít want as rough a horse as he is, though I will try them again in a few days when his back gets a little more sound.
I have heard from that country since I left home and it looks like nearly everybody is trying to get married.
Now I will close for the present, am hoping to hear from you soon.  Respectfully remains your son until death.
Co A 8th Cav. M.S.M.  Thomas J. Divine Springfield, Mo.

Thomas J. Divine Letter-
Springfield, Mo. July 29, 1864

Dear Brother,

It is with pleasure that I seat myself to write you a few lines in answer to a letter I recieved from you yesterday dated 26th instant.  I was glad to hear that you was well, though I am astonished to think your Captain has not let you off to get your wheat hauled up yet.  You say he wants you to stay in camp a few days until the mustering officer comes around.  You seem to be goining into your 20 months service.  And you also say you think it is the best thing that you all can do to be sure of your pay.  That may be very true.  It may be the best for you all.  I have no doubt but it will be the best thing that some men can do to enable them to get their pay.  In the name of God to hear a man talk of going into the 20 months service now and only have a little over 11 months to serve.  Now that is a matter of impossibility for a man who has never been in the service until a few days ago, to talk about going in now have their muster dated back to the 1st of November 1863.  Why sir this government has never been in the habit of paying men to stay at home, and it never will do it.
Now my dear brother just let me tell you that you only enrolled to do military duty for the year 1864 and assigned Co. F, 76th E.M.M.  and unless you have been sworn again since you went into Norris Co.  I say according to my judgment the best thing you could do would be to go back home and stay there till Co. F is ordered out, though if you think different, do as you like.  This thing of a man riding his own horse and getting pay for it is played out now.  I know this to be the fact for we will have a chance to sell our horses, or send them home in a few days.
Now I ask your honor after plowing my horses all summer, if they wonít be in good fix to sell by the time they are rode down in the Raugers.  So I want you to take my horse home and turn him on the range for I will have to do something with them between now and frost, and I say now, after them plowing all summer, that if they canít have the privilege of the range, I had much better have them here in place of Papís.  So if you please take my horse and let him stay there.
These few lines leaves us well and I hope they may find you enjoying the same blessing.  So with these few lines I will come to a close, hoping to hear from you soon.  Respectfully I remain your brother until death.
Thomas J. Divine
to R. C. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter - Springfield Oct. 2nd, 1864

Springfield, Mo.
Oct. 2nd, 1864

Dear Mother,
I write you these few lines to let you know that I have got back here from the mill where I was staying when I wrote you before.  I have nothing of interest to write at this time.
There is some considerable excitement here and has been for several days.  There is a great deal of talk about the Rebs coming through.  There is more talk than cider.  They have already come.  They have gone east of this to Rolla or Pilot Knob.  They have been fighting at the Knob several days ago.  General Sanborn left here last Tuesday morning at 4 oíclock with all the available cavalry and went east.  I heard today he was at Rolla.  I canít tell how true it is.
Pap is on the scout.  It has been reported here that they was at Mt. Vernon last Friday, though there is nothing of that only some Bush Whackers was in five or six miles of town and killed citizen or two.
I have been thinking I would get home before this, though Rebels coming in has prevented me from coming until this excitement dies down.
As I have had no letters from any of you since the 6th of Sept.  I want you to write to me as soon as you get this letter.
I have traded my horse for a mare and I will bring or send her home the first opportunity.  If Radford has not got his horse yet I want you to feed him what he will eat till I get the chance to come home.  There will be a man here in a few days to buy the rest of our horses.  I think it will be the best to put him into the service for one hundred and fifty dollars, than to winter him.
These few lines leave me in tolerable health.  I hope they may find you all enjoying good health.  So nothing more only remains your son till death.
Thomas J. Divine

Thomas J. Divine Letter
Springfield, Mo. Nov 2, 1864

Dear Mother,

I write you these few lines to let you know that I am well.  Hoping these few lines may find you all well.  I would have wrote sooner though this is the first chance I have had, and this is but a very few minutes.
I have been in the saddle ever since I left home and have been in some very close places.  I was in a running fight last Saturday for 18 miles.  We killed 39 Rebs and took 31 prisoners.  I just came in last night and we are all ordered out this morning with 15 days rations to go South after Price.
I have heard from Pap.  He was left Jefferson City with Captain Akard.  He told Ben Cantrell for me to make arrangements for you all to get shoes.  So if you need some buy some.
Write soon.  Respectfully yours until death.
Thomas J. Divine
Sam Douglass was wounded at Jefferson and has since died.

Thomas J. Divine - Evansville, Arkansas, March 14, 1869
Evansville, Arkansas

March the 14th, 1869

Dear Father and Mother,
I seat myself this morning to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well, though I was very sick last Sunday and Monday.
I am gathering some cattle.  Disposed of old Jim.  I got two yoke of good work oxen for her.
We have set the 14th of this month to start and it will take ten days to come through I think.
I will get rid of Jack today.  If there is any chance to get Frank Smith to take my colts and filly that I have at home for one hundred and sixty-five or seventy dollars do so.  Let on to Frank that I donít think I can get the cattle as there is only so many cattle buyers in this country, and I think he will take my horses.
I will come down as soon as I get home.
I am as ever yours truly,

Thomas J. Divine
to W. W. Divine

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