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Jefferson Pinkney Linder is one of the enterprising and industrious agriculturists of this region, and is a son of Abraham W. and Itea (Templeman) Linder, the former of whom was born in Spartanburg District, S. C. He was of English descent, his grandfather having emigrated from England to America before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, and took an active part in that struggle on the side of the Colonists. He settled in North Carolina, and there reared his family, his son John, the grandfather of our subject, being born there. He was married in that State and at an early day removed to South Carolina, where his son Abraham W. was educated and grew to manhood. He was also married there and eight of his children were born there prior to the year 1844, after which they moved to Alabama and settled in Benton County, where four more children were given them. Their names are as follows: John A. (born July 18, 1823), Calvin D. (born July 1, 1825), Elizabeth Ann (born July 10, 1827), Delilah E. (born September 9, 1829), James Templeman (born April 17, 1832), Lewis M. (born October 24, 1834), Austin A. (born March 17, 1837), Jefferson Pinkney (born August 10, 1839), Mary A. (born October 6, 1841), Arcena S. (born March 21, 1844), Virgil Taylor (born June 3, 1848) and Martha C. (born on March 8, 1851). The father and mother of these children were born on September 23, 1803, and February 27, 1807, respectively, and in 1857 they came to Arkansas. Abraham Linder and his sons were opposed to secession, but Lewis M. and Austin A. espoused the Confederate cause after the ordinance of secession had been passed, and served as members in a company of Arkansas Volunteer Infantry. Lewis M. died of measles while at home on a sick furlough, and Austin was mortally wounded at the battle of Helena, Ark., on July 4, 1863, and was taken from the field where he fell by the Federals to a hospital at Memphis and there died. Jefferson Pinkney Linder (our subject) was reared to farm life and received his education principally in the subscription schools of Alabama, whither his father had moved from South Carolina. He embraced religion at the age of twenty-one years, and is now a member of the Presbyterian Church. On December 4, 1861, he was married to Miss Lucinda Jane Shelton, a daughter of John F. and Martha Payne (Milam) Shelton, of Shelby County, Tenn., her birth occurring in that county on May 8, 1846. The names of their children are here given: Thomas Jefferson (born March 28, 1863), Laura Eudora (born August 24, 1865), Margaret Itea (born December 26, 1867), John Robert (born January 6, 1870), Charles Henry (was born on February 1, 1873, and died August 1, 1875), McWilliam (was born on August 4, 1875,) Oscar B. (was born on September 5, 1877), Albert Lee (born February 8, 1880), Mertie Velmer (born March 23, 1882, and died October 9, 1884), Vida May (born June 16, 1884, and died August 3, 1886), Burrilah (born on February 14, 1887). Thomas J. was married to Miss Fannie Dennis, of Henderson County, Tex., on December 23, 1886, and is now [p.197] farming in Monroe County, Ark. Laura E. became the wife of S. N. Trotter, and lives in Monroe County, Ark. Margaret Itea bore one child by her husband, J. W. Acree, but is now separated from him by mutual consent. Mr. Linder has been noted for his industry and thrift, and on commencing life these constituted his capital stock and well he has made use of them, being now the owner of 360 acres of land, his first purchase being only eighty acres. He has 100 acres under cultivation and makes a specialty of stock raising, his mules being of a fine grade, and he also has some very fine horses of the Tone Hal breed. Mr. Linder was troubled for some time with a scrofulous white swelling on one of his legs which finally resulted in the loss of that member, the operation being performed in 1879. He is a man possessing a fund of useful information and is a Democrat in his political views. Himself and wife and four children are members of the Baptist Church.

Elder Benjamin H. Lumpkin, a prominent Baptist minister of White County, is a son of Robert and Jane (Harden) Lumpkin, and owes his nativity to Arkansas, his birth occurring May 2, 1849. Robert Lumpkin was a native of Georgia, and his wife of Ballard County, Ky. They were married in the latter State and came to White County in February, 1835, settling near Denmark, said county, where Mr. Lumpkin died in 1855. He was a Universalist in belief and a farmer by occupation. Mrs. Lumpkin was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years, and closed her eyes to the trials and tribulations of this world in 1857. Mr. Lumpkin in his political views was a Democrat, and manifested an active interest in party campaigns. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Lumpkin, eight children were born, three sons and five daughters: Louisa (wife of Elder J. M. Butler, a Baptist missionary to the Cherokee Indians), Susan M. (Mrs. Ramer, of Shelby County, Tenn.), Sophia E. (now Mrs. J. F. Burket, residing in Northern Arkansas), Benjamin H. (subject of this sketch), John (died while in the Rebel army at Bowling Green, Ky.), Noah (deceased in boyhood, in White County), Charity (wife of Thomas Simmons, a farmer of Fulton County, Ark.) and Rebecca (died in White County, Ark., in 1868). Benjamin H. passed his early life near Denmark, Ark., and received but meager advantages for an education in his youth, but is now a well-read gentleman, and conversant on all important subjects of the day. He began preaching at the age of twenty-nine years, and by his earnest and eloquent expounding, has made many converts to his faith. He began farming at the age of fifteen years, which he continued until he reached the age of thirty. In 1883 Mr. Lumpkin embarked in the mercantile business in connection with his preaching, and has been very successful in that departure. He carries a stock of carefully selected groceries, valued at $15,000. Mr. Lumpkin was married July 19, 1870, to Rachel F. Ruminor, of White County, and a daughter of James Ruminor. By this marriage five children have been born, two sons and three daughters: Allie F., Hayden A., Maggie A., Benjamin T. and Lena Rivers (deceased). Mr. Lumpkin was elected justice of the peace in September of 1888, for a period of two years, and is discharging the duties of that office in a manner that proves beyond a doubt his ability to satisfactorily fill that position. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church in his religious belief, and a stanch Democrat in politics. Mr. Lumpkin contributes liberally to all worthy enterprises, and lends his valuable support to all church, school and charitable movements. In societies he is identified with the Masonic order, in which he is a member in high standing.

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Dr. J. F. McAdams, physician and surgeon, Searcy, Ark. There are few men of the present day whom the world acknowledges as successful more worthy of honorable mention or whose life-history affords a better example of what may be accomplished by a determined will and perseverance than that of Dr. J. F. McAdams. This gentleman was born in Shelby County, Ala., in 1830, and was the fourth of seven children, the result of the marriage of James and Sarah (Foreman) McAdams, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Tennessee. The father was a planter, and when a young man went to Alabama, where he married [p.198] Miss Foreman and settled on a farm within five miles of Columbiana, where he lived for over fifty years. His death occurred in 1867, and his wife died in February, 1889. Of their family the following children are living: Isaac F. (resides in Dallas, Tex.), J. F., Elizabeth (now Mrs. Edwards, of Shelby County, Ala.), Sarah (now Mrs. Horton, resides in Shelby County, Ala.), and Dr. Henry Clay (who is married and residesin Shelby County, Ala.). Dr. J. F. McAdams was reared to plantation life and secured a good practical education in the schools of Shelby County, Ala., subsequently taking a three-years' course in Talladega, Ala. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, and at the same time commenced reading medicine at the Mobile Medical Institute, graduating in the class of 1861. After this he practiced some and in the spring of 1862 came to Searcy. He was the leading physician of the county during the war, and remained at home by request. He was married in Perry County, Ala., in 1859, to Miss Sarah J. Crow, a native of Perry County, Ala., and daughter of Joseph W. and Elizabeth (Hopper) Crow, natives of Alabama. Her father was a successful agriculturist and his death occurred in 1865. His wife died in 1876. When coming to Searcy in 1862 Dr. McAdams found the town very small, and where fine business streets now are was then undergrowth. The Doctor opened his office in the public square and began practicing, which he continued all through the war without molestation. He is not very active in politics, but votes with the Democratic party. Socially, he is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M. To his marriage was born one child, Frank Waldo, who is book-keeper for F. Lippman, at Olyphant, Ark. Dr. McAdams has seen many changes since first residing here, both from an educational and moral standpoint. The customs of the people have also changed. He and Mrs. McAdams are members of the Baptist Church.

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Maj. John C. McCauley, Searcy, Ark., is one of the well-known and esteemed pioneer residents of this county, having come to White County in 1851. He was born in Orange County, N. C., February 24, 1834, and was the second in a family of nine children born to James and Mary A. (Freeland) McCauley, both natives of North Carolina. The father grew to manhood near Chapel Hill, N. C., settled on a plantation and made that his home until 1836, when he moved to Tennessee. He first settled in Fayette County, then Tipton County, and kept a hotel at Concordia, Tenn., in 1851. Later than this he came to White County, settled in Gray Township, speculated in land (being also a contractor), and erected a great many houses in Searcy. He there closed his eyes to the scenes of this world in December, 1888, at the age of seventy-nine years. His excellent wife died in 1883. The father was a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., and was charter member of the same. Of their family, seven children are now living: E. J. (now Mrs. E. J. Carter, who resides in Searcy), Maj. John C., Mary A. (now Mrs. William T. Holloway, of Searcy), Martha E. (now Mrs. Joseph R. Hall, resides in Tipton County, Tenn., near the old homestead), James (is married, and resides on the father's homestead near Judsonia), Catherine B. (now Mrs. John D. Sprigg, resides at Searcy), and George C. (who married Miss Emma Black, resides at West Point, White County). The paternal great-grandfather, John McCauley, was a captain under Gen. Marion in the War of the Revolution. He was at Antrim Island in the war against England, retreated and took secret passage on a Colonial vessel, in which he safely crossed the ocean to America. He landed in North Carolina, and made that State his home. Grandfather John McCauley was a soldier in the War of 1812, and held the rank of colonel. He represented Orange County, N. C., in the legislature for many years, and his death occurred in that State. On the mother's side, the family was of Scotch descent. Maj. John C. McCauley was nearly seventeen years of age when he came to White County, and received his education under the tutelage of Dr. James Holmes, an able educator. After coming to Arkansas he commenced studying law under Scott McConaughey, but in 1852 engaged in merchandising, which business he has since continued, with the exception of four years during the war (1861-65). He has had different [p.199] partners, the present firm being McCauley & Son, which has continued since 1865, and carry everything to be found in a general store. In 1861 Mr. McCauley raised Company K, First State Guards, and entered the State's service January 1, 1861. Later he was transferred to the Seventh Arkansas Infantry, and remained there during the war. He was in the bombardment of Columbus, Ky., and was at Bowling Green and Shiloh; was twice wounded, and was confined in the hospital at Tupelo, Miss., and Blount Springs, Ala. After the battle of Shiloh the company was reorganized, and the subject of this sketch was the only one of the company re-elected, and he was promoted to the position of major. He was in Farmington, took the battery and then rejoined Gen. Bragg in his invasion of Kentucky. After the battle of Chickamauga, Ga., he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and after the battle of Missionary Ridge he was detailed and put in charge of a company to recruit men. He was captured by the Third Missouri Cavalry near Batesville and taken to the military prison at Little Rock, where he was paroled by Col. Chandler at the house of Mrs. Green, remained two months, and was then taken to Johnston Island, where he was exchanged on January 9, 1865. He surrendered on May 9, 1865, after which he returned to White County and engaged in merchandising. He has taken quite an active part in politics, and votes with the Democratic party. He was deputy postmaster for many years before the war, and was postmaster under President Hayes, filled the same position under President Cleveland, and occupies that position at the present time. He has been Master of the Masonic Lodge No. 49, Searcy, for six years, is a member of Tillman Chapter No. 19, and has been High Priest and King; is also a member of the Council, having been Thrice Illustrious. Maj. McCauley was married in Tipton County, Tenn., in 1855, to Miss Eliza J. Hall, a native of Tennessee, and the daughter of Thomas S. and Mary Hall, natives of North Carolina. Her father was a farmer and tanner, and both he and wife died in Tennessee. They were related by marriage to Stonewall Jackson. To Mr. and Mrs. McCauley were born four living children: Aurora (now Mrs. Fancette, resides in Searcy), Charles E. (widower, and is postal clerk on the Iron Mountain Railroad between St. Louis and Little Rock), Ernest J. and James Thomas. Mr. McCauley and wife are members of the Old School Presbyterian Church, and he is deacon and Bible-class teacher in the same.

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James A. McCauley, farmer and ginner, White County, Ark. Permanent success in any calling in life is largely dependent upon the energy, perseverance and enterprise of an individual, and this, together with honest, upright dealing, will eventually bring him to the front. Mr. McCauley was originally from Tipton County, Tenn., where his birth occurred in 1842, and was the fifth of seven children, the result of the union of James and Mary (Freeland) McCauley, natives of Orange County, N. C. The parents were married in Chapel Hill, N. C., and in 1836 moved to Tipton County, Tenn., where the father tilled the soil until 1851. He then came to White County, settled at Prospect Bluff, now Judsonia, and in connection with his former pursuit, ran a steam saw-mill, one of the first in the county, and doing the grinding for several counties. In 1885 he moved to West Point, White County, and there his death occurred on December 15, 1888. His wife received her final summons in Searcy, in 1882. James A. McCauley attained his growth on the farm, received his education in the schools of Searcy, and on April 13, 1861, he enlisted in Company K, Seventh Arkansas Infantry, as a private, for one year. He was in the battle of Shiloh, and after this disastrous engagement he re-enlisted for three years or during service, in the same company and regiment. He was in the battles of Perryville and Murfreesboro, and at the reorganization of the company he was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. This was after the last-named battle. The regiment was consolidated with the Sixth Arkansas Infantry, and Mr. McCauley was transferred to Gen. Kirby Smith. He was put in Turnbull Camp, Washington, Hempstead County, for four months, drilling troops, and was then transferred to Dobbin's brigade, McGee's regular cavalry. He was with [p.200] Gen. Price on the Missouri raid and was paroled at Jacksonport, Ark., in 1865, after which he returned to White County. Mr. McCauley then embarked in mercantile pursuits in Searcy, in 1866, but the following year sold out and returned to the farm. His marriage occurred in White County, on December 13, 1865, to Miss Nancy A. Bond, a native of White County, and the daughter of John W. and Emily (Smith) Bond, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. The father moved to Arkansas Territory in 1836, and was residing there when it was admitted into the Union. He was the first county clerk of White County, was one of the prominent and first merchants of Searcy, and started his store in the woods. His death occurred in 1887. His wife died in 1869. Mr. McCauley settled where he now resides in 1856, and in 1874 he purchased 715 acres of land, and now has 315 under cultivation. He raises grain and cotton. Mr. McCauley has been running a cotton-gin ever since he settled on the farm, and has been quite successful. In his political views he is a cotton-mouth Democrat. To his marriage were born ten children: James Walto, Emma, Holmes, Stonewall, Lee, Hardee, Pat Cleburne, Jeff Davis, Allen and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley are members of the Presbyterian Church.

George C. McCauley is not unknown to the many readers of the present volume. He learned the miller's trade when a boy, and operated a gristmill and cotton-gin at Judsonia for six years, after which he engaged in farmin on the old Beeler place, where he remained nine years. Moving thence to West Point, he engaged in farming and in the cotton-gin business, in which he is still engaged, enjoying the confidence and liberal patronage of his many acquaintances. On October 24, 1877, he was married to Miss Emma Black, a daughter of W. G. Black, who was born in 1860, in Searcy. They became the parents of three children, two of whom are still living: Mattie May and Maud E. Mr. McCauley is a strong Democrat, and a liberal donator to all enterprises for the benefit of church or educational work. He was born in Tipton County, Tenn., on February 5, 1851, being the son of James and Mary Ann McCauley, natives of North Carolina, who were reared near Raleigh, where they were married and made their home for some time. After residing awhile in Tennessee and Missouri, they finally came to Arkansas in 1851, settling in White County. Mr. McCauley was one of the most successful farmers that ever found a home in Arkansas, being the owner of 1,200 acres of land at the time of his death, which occurred in December, 1888, at the age of seventy-seven years; his wife had died in 1882, in her seventy-second year. Both were members of the Presbyterian Church, and were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are still living: Elizabeth (the wife of W. B. Carter, of Searcy), John C. (the present postmaster of Searcy), Mary (wife of W. T. Holloway), Martha (wife of J. B. Hall), James A. (farmer of this county), Catharine B. (wife of Capt. J. D. Spriggs, now deceased) and George C. (our subject).

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R. H. McCulloch, farmer and stock raiser, Searcy, Ark. In reviewing the lives of those individuals mentioned in this volume no adequate idea of the agricultural affairs of White County, or of its substantial citizens, would be complete, which failed to make mention of Mr. McCulloch, or of the substantial property which he owns. Originally from Murfreesboro, Rutherford County. Tenn., his birth occurred August 26, 1849, he passing his boyhood days and early manhood in Tennessee. He was educated in Andrew College of that State, and after leaving school began the study of pharmacy, subsequently going to Giles County, Tenn., where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits from 1870 to 1871. The next year he became book-keeper at Plum Bayou, in Jefferson Township, on the Arkansas River. In March, 1873, he came to Gray Township, White County, and finally locating at Beebe, entered the employ of Strange & Ward as book-keeper, with whom he remained for two years. Deciding to settle in Union Township, he purchased a farm of 120 acres, with sixty-five under cultivation, and now has eighty-five acres of it improved. On October 27, 1884, Mr. McCulloch moved to Searcy, having the previous September been elected clerk of the circuit and chancery court, and also recorder, and [p.201] served efficiently in that capacity until October 30, 1888, when he was engaged as traveling salesman for Mitchell & Bettis, of Little Rock, continuing on the road until March 1, 1889. He then moved to his present farm, having bought in 1887 eighty acres, with thirty acres under cultivation. He now owns a good place of 200 acres, with 115 acres under substantial improvement, besides a timber tract of 169 acres. Mr. McCulloch is the eldest in a family of five children born to Dr. P. D. and Lucy V. McCulloch, both being natives of Tennessee. The father was a physician and surgeon by profession, and in 1876 moved to Hot Springs, Ark., where he still resides. He has been active in the Masonic order, having just retired as Grand Knight of the Grand Templars of the State. He represented the Grand Lodge of Tennessee in all its various offices. The mother of R. H. McCulloch died in July, 1865, in Gibson County, Tenn. In their family were the following children: R. H., P. D. (married, and resides in Lee County; is an attorney and an extensive planter), E. A. (married, and an attorney in Lee County) and Lydia B. (now Mrs. J. T. Hogg; resides in Trenton, Tenn.; her husband is traveling salesman for a Memphis firm). R. H. McCulloch was married in White County, Ark., November 25, 1874, to Miss Anna E. Cobb, a native of Tennessee (Haywood County), and the daughter of T. T. and Mary (Rose) Cobb, of North Carolina origin, who immigrated from that State in 1832 and 1833, respectively, to Tennessee. In 1858 they came to White County, Ark., settling in Union Township, and there the father's death occurred in 1881. The mother died about 1860. Mr. McCulloch lost his excellent wife in 1876, and was married again in White County, June 30, 1878, to Mattie L. Cobb, a Tennesseean by birth, and the daughter of S. P. and Eliza (Rose) Cobb, originally from North Carolina. The parents moved to Tennessee in 1832, coming thence to White County, Ark., in 1870, and settling near Beebe, where the father followed agricultural pursuits. Both parents are now living. To Mr. and Mrs. McCulloch were born five children: Samuel R., Philip D., Bertha C., Maggie and R. H., Jr. Mr. McCulloch is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M.; was Worshipful Master of Beebe Lodge No. 145 for about ten years; is a member of Tillman Chapter No. 19, R. A. M., and belongs to Searcy Lodge, K. of H., at Searcy. He has been for a number of years a member of the Grand Lodge, and for the past three years has been secretary and treasurer, and chairman for two years.

Miles C. McDowell, actively occupied as a farmer and stock raiser, of Marshall Township, White County, Ark., is the son of Harvey and Ruth (Walker) McDowell, and was born in Tennessee in 1854. Harvey McDowell, also a native of Tennessee, dates his existence from July, 1806, as a son of Joseph and Olive McDowell. He spent his younger days on a plantation, and in the schools of Tennessee, and was married in April, 1834, to Ruth Walker, becoming by her the father of the following family: Ollie (Mrs. W. F. Gill, now deceased), Parthena (Mrs. L. Jones, also deceased), Louisa (widow of Mr. Greegs), William (married), Gideon, Robert, John, Harriet C. and Miles C. (the subject of this memoir). Harvey McDowell died soon after the war, his last days being spent in Missouri, where he had moved with his family from Tennessee. After his father's demise, Miles C. came to Arkansas in company with his mother, and purchased land in White County which he soon after sold, and subsequently acquired another 120 acres in the same township, one mile south of Romance. This farm he bought in 1888, and now has forty acres in an excellent state of cultivation. His fam is well and carefully stocked, and in many respects is the equal of any in the country. His mother, who is residing with him, is an estimable lady, and is hale and hearty for a person of her age. Mr. McDowell takes decided interest in all those movements which promise good to the county, and never fails to give his support to any worthy cause.

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George W. McKinney is one of the most enterprising and progressive farmers of White County and one who has done a great deal in changing the country from a dense wilderness to what is now a prosperous and thrifty community. Born on May 9, 1826, in Monroe County, Miss., he came to Arkansas in 1870, and settled on the farm that he now owns, buying 120 acres on which was a [p.202] small log-cabin and about ten acres cleared, but shortly after he purchased 200 acres more, and erected a good house, barns, fences, etc., having here 135 acres under successful cultivation, and all the necessary improvements of the present day. Mr. McKinney is a model farmer, as everything around his place indicates; negligence and degeneracy being traits unknown about his home. He is the son of John and Rosanna (Land) McKinney, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, who were married in the latter State and shortly afterward moved to Mississippi, there becoming engaged in farming. Mr. McKinney was a Democrat, and soldier in the War of 1812, also serving as magistrate of his county for several years. His death occurred in 1832, his wife surviving him until 1872. They were the parents of nine children, five now living. The oldest son, J. G., is a prosperous farmer in Texas. Susan C. (Mrs. Chesley Malone, at present resides in Calhoun County, Miss.), Andrew J. (is a farmer of Chickasaw County, Miss.), and one daughter (Mrs. R. E. Brewer). George W. was reared to farm life, and received a good education in the common schools of the period. He cared for his aged mother until her death, giving her all the comforts necessary to her declining years, and in his twenty-fourth year was married to Miss Helen C. Gibbs of Mississippi birth, by whom he became the father of eight children, six now surviving: W. T. (a farmer of Royal Township, White County), John M. (also a farmer in Royal Township, White County), George W. (at home), T. A. (a farmer of Royal Township, White County), Margaret A. (wife of James W. Hall, a prominent farmer of Royal Township), J. R. and Julia E. (now Mrs. Thomas S. Kitchen). Mrs. McKinney died in 1889, and Mr. McKinney chose for his second and present wife, Mrs. M. E. Malone, a native of Mississippi. At the time of the war Mr. McKinney was justice of the peace and consequently did not enter the service until 1863, when he enlisted in Col. Duff's regiment, remaining until the final surrender. He was in McCullough's brigade in the cavalry service, and participated in several brisk skirmishes, but was never wounded. He was ordered to Mobile with Col. Duff, and advised by that colonel to go to his family. While in Mississippi Mr. McKinney held the office of justice of the peace and overseer of roads and men. He is a member of El Paso Lodge No. 65, A. F. & A. M., and was made a Mason in 1865, also belonging at this time to New Hope Agricultural Wheel No. 32, T. A., and is treasurer of the Wheel. He is at present a member of his school board, and takes an active interest in schools, churches, and gives his influence and help to all public enterprises. In his political views Mr. McKinney is a Democrat, but casts his vote irrespective of party and where he considers it will do the most good, supporting always the best man for the position.

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D. L. McLeod, who, though comparatively young in years, has had an experience such as but few men enjoy, is now a prosperous planter and fruit grower of White County. When only fourteen years of age he became a "sailor boy," and in 1869 received the honor of being made captain in the merchant service. He was born in Prince Edward's Island, Canada, April 27, 1841, and is the son of Donald McLeod, also a native of Canada, who there married Miss Annie Henderson, her birth also occurring on Prince Edward's Island. A family of six children blessed this union, five of whom are still living. Donald McLeod was principally engaged in agricultural pursuits during life, in which he was very successful. Himself and wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he had been deacon for a number of years, rigidly upholding the tenets of his belief. His wife died some years previous to his demise, which occurred in 1886. From January, 1864, D. L. McLeod served as chief quartermaster in the United States navy, receiving honorable recognition for the manner in which he discharged his duties. His term of service in the navy expired in May, 1867, but he at once returned to the sea and engaged in the merchant service continuing until 1879. One noteworthy event marks his career during this time: A beautiful marine telescope was presented to him in 1873, awarded by the King of Norway for a brave and noble deed in rescuing a [p.203] Norwegian crew, on the Atlantic Ocean. Mr. McLeod was married, in 1874, to Susie K. Kitchen, a daughter of William and Jane Kitchen, and a native of Ontario, Canada. To this union two children have been born: Lillie J. (born in Akyobe, India, April, 1875, and died in 1880), William (born in February, 1877, and died at sea May, 1878, and is buried at Belfast, Ireland) and Arthur R. (who is now seven years old). In 1880 Mr. McLeod became a resident of Iowa, where he remained for three years engaged in fine stock raising, in Fayette County, but in 1883 he moved to Arkansas and located at Judsonia, White County, where he still lives, successfully occupied in fruit growing. He owns 240 acres of excellent land, and has a fine residence, which he has erected during his abode here. He is a Master Mason in good standing and is also president of the Arkansas Fruit Growers' Union, which was organized in 1886. Besides this he is first vice-president of the State Horticultural Society, and, with his wife, belongs to the Baptist Church.

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Dandridge McRae, attorney at law. Searcy, Ark., has every reason to be proud of both its law courts and the members of the bar who support them. Among the leading firms of attorneys in Searcy, is the well-known one of Messrs. McRae, Rives & Rives, who are notable representatives of the learned profession. Mr. McRae has also been expert for the United States treasury department, appointed in 1889, and this business is to gather statistics for that department. He was born in Baldwin County, Ala., on October 10, 1829, and the eldest in a family of eleven children born to the union of D. R. W. and Margaret (Braey) McRae, the father of West Florida Parish, Miss., and the mother of South Carolina. The parents were married in Alabama in 1828, and were the owners of a large plantation, which he carried on although he was a lawyer by profession. He took quite an active part in politics, was sheriff of Clark County, and represented that county in the legislature. His death occurred in March, 1849. After the death of her husband and the same year, Mrs. McRae came to White County, Ark., settled in Little Red River Township, entered land, improved it, bought several claims, and in 1859 moved to Pulaski County, near Little Rock, and made that her home until 1861. After this she visited the Lone Star State, but returned, and her death occurred at the home of her son, Dandridge McRae, in Searcy in 1867. Those members of the family living are: Dandridge, Rebecca (Mrs. Col. G. F. Bancum, of Little Rock), Ann (wife of A. T. Jones, near West Point, White County, Ark.) and Mrs. Mona Rawles (at Perryville, Perry County). Dandridge McRae was early trained to the arduous duties of the farm, received his education at home under a private tutor, and later entered the University of South Carolina, from which institution he graduated in the class of 1849. He then aided in opening up the farm in Red River Township, but in 1853 moved to Searcy, and there commenced reading law. He was admitted to the bar by Justice C. C. Scott, of the supreme court, in 1854, and commenced the practice of law immediately afterward. In 1856 e was elected county and circuit clerk of the county, and served six years. In 1861 he was actively engaged in organizing troops for the State, and in the same year was sent by the military board to muster Gen. N. P. Pierce, brigadier of State troops, while even at that time the Missourians were driven from the State by the Federal Generals Lyon and Siegel. Gen. Ben. McCulloch in command of the Arkansas and Indian Territory, issued a proclamation to the people of Arkansas to go to the border and repel invaders. Many companies organized reported to Mr. McRae, and at the request of the General, the former took command and moved into Missouri, toward Springfield, to make a diversion, while the General moved to Carthage to relieve Gen. Parsons of the Missouri State Guards. Upon his return to Arkansas Mr. McRae organized a regiment under the direction of Gen. McCulloch, and was made colonel of the same. He served until 1862, was with Gen. McCulloch at Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge and Corinth. He returned to Arkansas in 1862, raised another regiment by June, and was assigned by Gen. Hindman the command of a brigade. This brigade served until 1862, when Mr. McRae was promoted in December, to the [p.204] rank of brigadier-general, and served in that capacity until the close of the war. He was in the battle of Helena, captured the only fort taken, also Jenkins' Ferry, Prairie Grove, and returned to Searcy, White County, in 1865. He engaged in the practice of law until 1881, and was then deputy secretary of State for four years. In 1885 he was acting commissioner for Arkansas, at the World's Fair at New Orleans, and in 1886 was the commissioner. Mr. McRae was appointed expert on December 26, 1888, by United States treasury department for gathering information. He was vice-president of the bureau of emigration of Arkansas in 1887. Socially, he is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., and was Worshipful Master of the same; is a member of Tillman Chapter No. 19, and a member of the Council. Mr. McRae was married in De Soto County, Miss., on January 10, 1855, to Miss Angie Lewis, a native of Mississippi, who bore her husband two children: Annie (now Mrs. Neeley, residing in Searcy) and Minnie (now Mrs. J. F. Rives, Jr., residing in Searcy).

Thomas Jefferson Malone, planter and stock raiser at Pleasant Plains, Ark., is the son of Stephen and Sarah (Parks) Malone, natives of North Carolina, being born December 16, 1816, in Henry County, Tenn. He was reared in the arduous duties of the farm, received his education in his native county, and on December 20, 1846, he was married in Fayette County, Tenn., to Miss Pinie E. Ozier, a native of North Carolina, where she partly received her education. In about 1848 Mr. Malone purchased a tract of land, consisting of 160 acres of unimproved land, and this he went to work to improve. After clearing about twenty-five acres and erecting good buildings, he sold this property and came to Arkansas. To his marriage were born six children, four of whom are now living: Sarah Frances (born in 1847), William Thomas (born in 1849, and died in 1857), Alice Jane (born in 1858), an infant (died unnamed), Charles Calvin (born May 7, 1861) and Lititia (born in 1863). Sarah Frances married W. Yarbrough, a native of Tennessee, is the mother of three children, and now resides in White County. Calvin C. married Miss Ella Boen, a native of Alabama, and now resides with parents. Martha Ann married James Kilo, a native of Arkansas, and has one child. They also reside with the parents. Mr. Malone came to Arkansas in 1856, located in Independence County, and there made their home for one year, he engaged in tilling the soil. In 1857 he came to White County, located on his present farm, and there he has since made his home. The original tract contained about 194 acres, which were uncultivated at that time. Mr. Malone has purchased other tracts at various times and has always sold to advantage. He has put all the improvements on his place and has about fifty-three acres under fence. The soil is of good quality and furnishes nearly all the necessaries of life, corn and cotton being the principal crops. Vegetables of all kinds grow in abundance, and he also raises some tobacco which is of good quality. Mr. and Mrs. Malone are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and have held membership since 1843. They live true Christian lives and have the love and esteem of a large circle of friends. Mr. Malone is a member of Cedar Grove Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and is also a member of the Agricultural Wheel No. 88. The parents of Mr. Malone were natives of North Carolina, and were married in that State. They were of Scotch-German descent and their ancestors on both sides came to the United States prior to the Revolutionary War. Grandfather Malone served seven years in the Colonial War and drew a pension for some years previous to his death, which occurred at the age of eighty-one years. Grandfather Parks also participated in that war, serving in the capacity of colonel, and died about 1804. To Stephen and Sarah (Parks) Malone were born thirteen children, all of whom grew to maturity.

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Mrs. Malinda J. Malone, proprietress of a well-kept hotel at Auvergne, Ark., is a daughter of Henry R. and Mary E. (Follis) Bray, the former a Baptist minister and a native of Virginia, and the latter born in the "Palmetto State." They were married in Alabama in 1832, and shortly afterward moved to Lynnville, Tenn., where they made their home for twelve years, Mr. Bray being engaged in [p.205] conducting a large woodyard, blacksmith's shop and also attended to his ministerial duties. In 1850 Rev. Bray removed with his family to Alabama, where he followed the occupation of farming and preaching until 1860, when he settled in Madison County, Ark., and two years later moved to Cotton Plant, in Phillips County, where he resided five years. In the fall of 1867, he came to Jackson County, and purchased 250 acres of land and was here residing at the time of his death in July, 1870, his wife's death occuring five years later. Mrs.Bray was a daughter of William and Mary (Dickinson) Follis who were natives of South Carolina, and removed to Alabama at an early day. The father's ancestors were Virginians and of Irish descent. Mrs. Malone is the eldest of a family of nine children and is the only one now living, her birth occurring on November 23, 1837. The remainder of the family were: William R. (born March 14, 1839; he was twice married and died January 3, 1888, two children and his last wife surviving him), Mary E. (was born August 1, 1841, and was married to Gabriel Couch of Jackson County, Ark., and died in 1871), Sarah A. (was born in 1843, and was the wife of G. O. Harrison, by him becoming the mother of three sons; she died in 1882), Charity E. (was born 1845 and was twice married, her first husband being William Johnson and her last Newton Bleakley; she died in 1880, leaving two sons, Charley W., who resides with Mrs. Malone and William, who lives in New Mexico), Iradel (was a farmer of Texas, but in 1881 moved to Jackson County, Ark., and died the same year), Martha (was the wife of Levi Blakely and died in 1871 leaving no issue), Boldon (died in 1877 at the age of eighteen years) and a little sister, Katie (died in infancy). Mrs. Malone was reared in Lynnville and in that town and in Rogersville, Ala., received her education. In 1854 she was married to B. T. Malone, she at that time being only fourteen and a half years of age and he nineteen. Their children are named as follows: John T. (a miller at Athens, Ala., has a wife and two children, Charlie and Dollie), Henry E. (a man of Thornton, Miller County, Ark; is married and has had five children but now has only three, Emmet, aged nine; Lulu, aged seven, and Lucile, aged five), Emma (is a young lady at home), Mollie L. (was born in 1863 and is the wife of J. A. Canada, a merchant of Beebe; she died in 1885 and her husband and one child survive her), Dollie (was born August 1, 1872, and died May 7, 1886), Mattie (was born August 2, 1866, and died August 6, 1877), Linnie (was born January 1, 1877 and died April 1, 1879), James W. (was born August 3, 1858 and died June 2, 1859) and Charles (born August 2, 1876, and died in infancy). After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Malone resided in Tennessee until 1859 and after a short residence in Northern Alabama they settled in Mississippi and there made their home for ten years. In 1869 they removed to and purchased a large plantation in Jackson County, Ark., and there also managed a mercantile establishment up to 1877, when they sold their land and moved to Beebe, purchasing considerable town property at that place on which they erected good buildings. Mr. Malone was also engaged in merchandising; in his political views was an active Democrat and held the offices of magistrate and notary public for a considerable length of time. He was a leading member of the Baptist Church and was a member in good standing of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Malone died in 1884 and his widow immediately put her shoulder to the wheel, increased her stock of dry goods and carried on the business at Beebe, and also erected a store at Auvergne which she put in charge of her son Henry E., her eldest son conducting the business at Beebe. In 1877 Mrs. Malone located in Auvergne and took charge of the Auvergne academy and for one year filled the office of matron of that institution. In September, 1888, she opened a hotel which she is at present successfully conducting and since the death of her husband she has so successfully conducted the property he left that it has greatly increased in value. She is a lady of great force of character and more than ordinary powers of mind and has reared her family in such a manner as to win the respect of all with whom she comes in contact. She is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and her family are also church members.

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Jeremiah E. Manasco. The Manasco family, [p.206] or rather that branch to which the subject of this sketch belongs, were early settlers of Arkansas, having originally come from Alabama, and were in all probability of French descent. Mr. Manasco, our subject, was born in Tipton County, Tenn., in 1833 or 1834, and is a son of James and Ruby E. (Crawford) Manasco, both of whom died about the year 1841, and although he was the youngest of a family of nine children, he was left to shift for himself, and became a hound boy to his brother John, and was reared by him to manhood on a farm. He suffered the trials of the orphan, and although his school advantages were very limited, and he was compelled to work very hard, he remained faithful to his bondsman till he reached his twenty-first year, when he drifted out into the world to try his own powers. He first engaged as a farm hand, doing all kinds of heavy work, becoming in the meantime thoroughly familiar with the details of farm work. In 1857 he was married to Miss Mary J. Flanagan, a native of Tennessee, and by her became the father of six children, three of whom lived to be grown: John F. (a railroad man of Little Rock), William J. (a resident of Tennessee), Preston V. (deceased), Amandeville W. (living) and twin girls, Emily and Martha (who died in infancy). The mother of these children died in September, 1869, in full communion with the Methodist Episcopal Church. After remaining a widower two years, Mr. Manasco married Miss Virginia P. Wooten, a native of Tennessee, and of their large family of ten children all are living: Nellie Naomi, May L., George W., Calla D., Bedford F., Reuben B., Fanny, Helen, Bertha and Leonora M. In 1864 Mr. Manasco joined the Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry, but owing to week eyes soon left the service. Before the war and afterward till January, 1872, Mr. Manasco carried on farming in his native State, and in this calling succeeded far beyond his expectations, but sold his property in December, 1871, and in 1872 removed to Prairie County, Ark., where he rented land and farmed for three years. Since that time he has resided in White County, and in 1875 purchased 160 acres of land, on which were erected some logcabins on fifty acres of cleared land. He set energetically to work to improve his property, and soon had one of the finest homes in White County. In June, 1885, he had the misfortune to lose his residence and nearly all its contents by fire, but he has since rebuilt, and now has one of the most substantial residences in the county. By subsequent purchases he has increased his lands to 245 acres, and has 100 acres under cultivation. The land is well adapted to raising all kinds of grain, but his principal crops are corn, cotton and oats. Mr. Manasco is public-spirited and enterprising, and has always favored worthy movements. He is a member of El Paso Lodge No. 65 of the A. F. & A. M.

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John S. Marsh, one of the well-known farmers and stock raisers of White County, is the son of Roland and Sarah (Webb) Marsh, his birth occurring in Warren County, Tenn., July 28, 1825. Roland Marsh was born and educated in North Carolina, emigrating when quite young to Tennessee in company with his parents, where he met and married Miss Webb, also of North Carolina nativity, and the daughter of Elisha and Sarah Webb. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh five children were born, four of them now living, and residents of Arkansas. They are Harry, Pollie, Sarah, Rachel and John S. Mr. Marsh was a farmer, and quite successful in the accumulation of wealth. He died in 1835, and his estimable wife only survived him about a year. Both were members of the Baptist Church. John S. passed his boyhood days in the schools of Warren County, Tenn., and in 1845 was united in the bands of matrimony to Annie Potter, also of Tennessee. Ten children blessed their marriage: Rollin, Tillman, Sarah J., Thomas M., Jackson R., Martha, William H., Martina and Martisia (twins) and Johnnie. Mrs. Marsh died in 1873, and in 1879, Mr. Marsh chose for his second wife Sarah Gordon, a resident and native of Tennessee. In 1849, when the subject of this sketch immigrated to Arkansas from Tennessee (locating in White County), he found himself the possessor of a single wagon and a yoke of oxen, the two comprising his worldly all. He now owns 120 acres of land well cultivated, and having exercised great care in the selection [p.207] of his stock, has some excellent animals. His farm, though not as large as some in the county, is perfectly complete in all its appointments, and its general appearance is indicative of peace and prosperity. Mr. Marsh takes a great interest in all educational matters, and is determined that his children shall be deprived of nothing that tends to advance their intellectual training. He is one of the organizers of the first church established in Mount Pisgah, and is an influential member. His wife and entire family are all members of the Methodist Church. He belongs to Lodge No. 460 of the Masonic order, in which he has held the office of treasurer.

 

John W. Matthews was the eldest son in the family of Robert and Annie (Howard) Matthews, the former of whom came upon the stage of life's action in Alabama, in 1802. His parents were Walter and Rachel Matthews, of South Carolina origin, but who moved to Alabama at an early day. Robert Matthews was married about 1830, and followed the occupation of a farmer all his life. Coming to Arkansas in 1836 (his family following him in 1852), he settled in White County; his wife had died shortly before his removal. Mr. Matthews enlisted as a soldier during the Civil War in 1863, and served until his death, which occurred at Rock Port in 1864. Himself and wife had a family of three children: John W., Sarah J. and Delia F. John W., the only surviving member, was born in Alabama in 1832, and was married in 1858 to Nancy Brady, daughter of William and Mirah (Cordal) Brady. Mr. and Mrs. Matthews are the parents of nine children: Mirah Ann (now Mrs. Pruett), Mary Jane (married S. M. West), James C., William R., John W., Joseph E., Benjamin F., Ester A. and Nancy N. Mr. Matthews enlisted in 1861 in Morse's company, Fourth Battalion, Arkansas Infantry, and took part in the battles of Cotton Plant, Ark.; Columbus, Ky., and a number of other engagements. He now owns a fine farm of 313 acres of land, 175 acres of which are under cultivation. Mrs. Matthews is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Matthews is treasurer of the County Wheel, and is an influential and highly respected citizen.

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Burwill M. Merrill is a member of the go-ahead, enterprising firm of Merrill & Reed, dealers in real estate in Beebe, Ark., a native of the "Empire State." He was born in Chautauqua County in 1835, as the son of George and Eliza (Millard) Merrill, natives of Massachusetts and Canada, respectively. George Merrill was born in 1809, and died in 1884, his wife, who was also born at an early date, dying at Burwill's birth. The latter, the only child of his father's first marriage, when about five years old, moved to Michigan with his parent, who became a very successful farmer in the "Wolverine State," giving his careful and undivided attention to that occupation. By his second marriage Mr. Merrill became the father of two children, only one now living: Letitia (wife of John Gordon, a farmer of Floyd County, Iowa). Burwill M. Merrill was given such advantages for obtaining an education as the excellent schools of Michigan afforded, and at the age of twenty-one assumed the responsibility of his father's farm, the care of which he continued until the latter's death in 1884. In 1854 he was married to Miss Lydia Wilson, a native of Canada, and to their union two children were born: Letitia (the wife of J. C. Covert, manufacturer of store fronts and other building materials, at Belmont, Iowa) and De Forest (a mechanic at Detroit). Mrs. Merrill died in 1867, having been a devoted wife and mother, and a membar of the Baptist Church. Mr. Merrill chose for his second wife Miss Alviria Cross, who also died in Clinton County, Mich., in 1884, having become the father of two children: George W. (who died at the age of eighteen, unmarried) and Florence L. (now the wife of Dr. A. C. Jordon, a prominent physician of Beebe, Ark., with which daughter Mr. Merrill now resides). He came to Arkansas in 1885, that he might find a home in a more genial climate, also desiring to try small fruit raising in this favored section. Purchasing sixty acres in White County, one mile west of Beebe, he at once turned his attention to the cultivation of small fruits and grasses. Mr. Merrill has tried all kinds of grasses, and is thoroughly convinced that the soil of White County will produce liberally any of the various kinds grown so bountifully in the [p.208] East and North. Red clover, three feet in length, was raised on his farm one season, which was something of a curiosity. He is now successfully raising regular crops of clover and timothy. Strawberries and root crops yield immensely. Garden vegetables are especially productive, sweet potatoes yielding 350 bushels per acre. Mr. Merrill is a member of Beebe Lodge No. 47, I. O. O. F., and has passed all the chairs in the subordinate lodge. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years, and is a public-spirited, enterprising man, giving his hearty support to all movements that betoken the good or growth of the county.

Christian Miller is a farmer and fruit grower of White County, Ark. This gentleman was born on Bornholm Island, Hasley, Denmark, in 1842, and is the second in a family of ten children, the result of the union of John and Elizabeth Miller, natives, also, of Denmark, and who died in their native land. Their children were named as follows: Mary, Christian, Sena, John, Petra, Lena, Otto Line (deceased), Andrew, James and Julyno. Four of these children came to this country, two of whom reside in Wyoming. Andrew and the subject of this sketch came to Arkansas and settled in White County. The latter spent his youth in his native country, was educated there and came to America in 1865, but first settled in New York. Later he moved to Illinois, remained there until 1871, and then, as stated above, came to White County, Ark., a settled in Harrison Township. He purchased eighty acres of timber land, improved it, and has added to the original tract until he now owns 240 acres, with 130 acres cleared and 100 acres devoted to horticulture. Mr. Miller was married in Illinois in 1871 to Miss Mary Hahn, daughter of Saro Hanson and Eline Christian Hahn, natives of Denmark. Mary Hahn came to America in 1861, first settling in Illinois. Mrs. Mary Hahn's marriage to Christian Miller was in 1871. After his marriage Mr. Miller moved to Arkansas, where he has remained ever since. He has about sixteen acres of land devoted to the raising of strawberries, ten acres in raspberries, and an extensive peach orchard of sixty acres. He is one of the most extensive shippers in Judsonia. He is also the owner of a good town property in Judsonia. Socially, he is a member of Anchor Lodge No. 384, A. F. & A. M., and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, of which he is a deacon. He is active in church and educational matters, and, in fact, takes a decided interest in all enterprises for the good of the county.

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John S. Mitchell, M. D., whose professional career is one in which he may take just pride, is a son of a veteran of the Mexican War, James S. Mitchell, and has been a resident of White County since 1858. James S. Mitchell was born in Monroe County, Ky., on August 14, 1793, and was married shortly after his return from the War of 1812, in which he was actively engaged, to Miss Sarah Scott, a Tennesseean by birth, born January 18, 1795. They were the parents of seven children: Dorcas (afterward Mrs. Gist), Frances (Wilson), Mary (Dies), Matilda (Barger), John S. (our subject) and Louis B. (who is also a physician of Monroe County. Mrs. Mitchell's family were also originally from Tonnessee. The Mitchells were connected with the celebrated Boone family of Kentucky. John S. was born in Kentucky November 14, 1824, growing to manhood on a farm, and accompanying his father to Henderson County, Tenn., when a boy. He was married December 30, 1849, to Miss Sarah J. Dotson, daughter of Thomas and Charlotte (Pipkin) Dotson, who were married in 1815, and became the parents of four children. After his marriage, Dr. Mitchell returned to Tennessee, living there nine years. In the spring of 1858 he came to White County, where he bought a farm of two hundred acres of unimproved land, clearing the same himself, and placing over half of it under cultivation. Himself and wife have been blessed with seven children, five of whom are living: Irena F. (Swinford), James B., William B., John T. (deceased), Albert G., Sally A. and Virgil. Dr. Mitchell also has ten grandchildren. He is a strong Democrat, and served as justice of the peace during the war and until the reconstruction. A Master Mason, he belongs to Centre Hill Lodge No. 114, and to Centre Hill Chapter. Dr. Mitchell and wife are connected with the Christian Church. [p.209] Two of their children only are living at home at the present time.

Nathaniel Lee Mitchell. The entire life of Mr. Mitchell has been passed in an industious manner, and not without substantial evidences of success, as will be seen from a glance at his present possessions. His birth occurred on April 11, 1828, and he is a son of Charles B. and Nancy (Miller) Mitchell and a native of Boonville, Cooper County, Mo. His paternal ancestors came to America in 1760, and the paternal grandfather, Thomas Mitchell, was born in the State of Virginia. The Millers came to America prior to the Revolution, probably about 1750. Owing to war troubles Great-grandfather Miller was forced from his home, and without his family, which consisted of his wife and infant, he was compelled to flee elsewhere for protection. Grandfather Miller was born in North Carolina, about 1780. Nathaniel Lee Mitchell received his early education in the district schools of his native county, and afterward entered the high school of Boonville, his school-days ending in the State University at Columbia, Mo., in 1850. In 1850 he crossed the plains to the gold region of California, and there worked in different mines for about one and a half years, his labors being attended with fair results, and he then returned to his home in Missouri, and the following year became second assistant of Solomon Houck, who was engaged in freighting goods between Kansas City, Mo., and Santa Fe, N. M., making one trip which required about eight months' time. In 1853 he again crossed the plains to California, via Salt Lake City, Utah, and as before only met with moderate success. At the end of two years he engaged in the butcher's business, and in 1857 bought a farm in Yolo County, consisting of 160 acres of improved land. In addition to managing this farm, he engaged in teaching, but in 1859 concluded to return home, so sold his property, and after returning home, engaged in collecting notes, and in 1861 rented a farm near Sedalia. The troubles incident to the war coming up at this time, he left his farm and enlisted in Company G, Second Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, Confederate States Army, under Gen. Price, who was at that time commanding the Confederate army in Southwest Missouri. Almost immediately after joining he was called to duty in the commissary department, and was given the rank of captain. After holding this position two years he resigned, and returned to duty with his company as a private soldier, and was at various times under the famous cavalry leaders: Price, Forrest, Chalmers and Armstrong. He surrendered with his command at East Port, Tenn., and was paroled at Columbus, settling soon after at Panola, Miss., where he became acquainted with Miss Susan A. Hall, to whom he was united in marriage on November 30, 1865. She is a Mississippian by birth, and is a daughter of Porter and Mary Hall (the father of Scotch-Irish descent, and a native of South Carolina). Some of his ancestors were soldiers in the Continental army during Revolutionary times. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell rented and farmed land for one year, and in 1866 immigrated to Missouri, and took up their abode on a farm near Kansas City, on which they resided three years. In 1870 they came to White County, but eleven years later moved to Washington County, where they purchased a forty-acre tract of land. Since 1884 they have resided on their present farm. Their children are: Mary M. (born August 30, 1866, and died in September, 1872), Charles Porter (born May 18, 1868, and is now studying medicine under the tutelage of Dr. McIntosh, of Beebe. He was married November 15, 1888, to Miss Mattie Byram, a native of Arkansas, and a daughter of William W. and Margaret (Williams) Byram), and William Nathaniel Mitchell (born January 6, 1871). These children have received good educational advantages, and are a credit to their parents. Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat, serving his party for years as justice of the peace, and he and his wife, and their son Charles and wife, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Mitchell is favorable to educational and religious advancement and in fact all worthy movements. He became a Mason in 1859, joining Cooper Lodge No. 36, and now holds a demit from that lodge, bearing date January 23, 1886.

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Josiah J. Moncrief, M. D., Hammonsville, Ark. [p.210] This able and successful practitioner owes his nativity to Harris County, Ga., where his birth occurred on April 13, 1858, as the son of George W. and Emily A. (Calhoun) Moncrief. The father is a native of Georgia, and of French descent, his ancestors having emigrated to America prior to 1770, and settled in Georgia. The grandfather, Lebanon Moncrief, was a soldier under Gen. Jackson, and was at the battle of New Orleans in 1812. The maternal ancestors were of Irish descent. Dr. J. J. Moncrief moved with his parents to Alabama in 1857, acquired a good English education, and in 1881 entered the office of D. Dunlap, M. D., where he commenced the study of

medicine in St. Clair County, of that State. In 1887 he attended a course of lectures in the Medical Department of the University of Arkansas, situated at Little Rock, and later located at Tupelo, Jackson County, Ark., where he practiced medicine for a short time. In April of 1889, he came to Hammonsville, where he located, and where he contemplates making his home. The Doctor is a member and secretary of Hammonsville Lodge of the A. F. & A. M. He also holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

 

William Bird Moon, M. D., is a native of Georgia; born June 12, 1821. He was reared and educated in his native State, receiving his medical education in Louisville Medical Institute, now the Medical University of Kentucky, following which he began practicing physic in 1845. After having remained in Georgia eight years he moved to Alabama and continued in active practice for nineteen years, coming thence to White County, Ark., in 1872, where he purchased real estate, upon which he now lives. Dr. Moon was married October 19, 1845, to Roena Cathrine Spratlen, daughter of Henry and Mary Spratlen, natives of Georgia. The Doctor and his wife are the parents of eleven children: Mary Caroline (born August 15, 1846, married S. S. Pearson in 1867, and died January 27, 1878), Francis L. (born April 21, 1848, married H. M. Ware, died March 26, 1876), Jacob Oliver (born July 31, 1856, died October 31, 1877), Susan C. (born June 20, 1854, married D. G. Copeland, and died March 27, 1888), James Calhoun (born October 8, 1864, died August 27, 1865), Theodosia Earnest (born May 31, 1866, died October 6, 1873), William David (born February 11, 1850, married Allie E. Darden), Ana P. (born April 19, 1852, married H. McKay), Emma Wilkinson (born September 6, 1858, married W. E. Powel), Robert Urial (born July 22, 1860, married G. H. Neely), and Alice Virginia (born September 5, 1862, married G. C. Layne). Dr. Moon is a son of Jacob and Mary Ann (Staples) Moon, who were also of Georgia nativity. Their ancestors came originally from Virginia. Jacob Moon was born September 28, 1795, and died August 13, 1877, and his wife, whose natal day was December 6, 1799, died November 16, 1876. Dr. Moon's brothers and sisters are: Lavina (born December 28, 1817, died in 1840), David Staples (born November 16, 1819), John Chapel (born August 15, 1824, died April 9, 1855), Thomas (born February 24, 1827, died March 21, 1852), Mary Ann (born February 18, 1829), Susan E. (born July 9, 1841). Dr. Moon is a devoted Democrat. He and his wife are members of Missionary Baptist Church, and take active interest in all laudable enterprises. He is deacon of his church.

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William D. Moon, M. D., is a worthy son of one of the most esteemed residents of this county. His parents were Dr. William B. and Roena C. (Spratlen) Moon, natives of Georgia, who moved to Alabama in 1853, as stated in the biography which immediately precedes this. William D. Moon first saw the light of day in 1850, improving to the utmost the advantages enjoyed for receiving an education in the common schools of Alabama. In 1877 he attended the medical college at Louisville, where his father had studied, and in 1878 commenced practicing in White County, Ark., which locality has been his parents' home for some years. His later career has been an encouraging and highly satisfactory one. Dr. Moon was married in the fall of 1872, to Allie E. Darden, daughter of J. W. and Nancy H. Darden. They have a family of four children: Robert E. Lee (deceased), Lena L., Yandell and William Darden. Dr. Moon and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. The former is a Democrat in politics [p.211] and is a highly respected citizen. Yandell is named after the Yandells in Louisville, Ky., who were fellow-students and teachers of the Doctor's grandfather, and several of them belonged to the medical faculty when the father was attending medical lectures in 1877.

Moore & Lyon are proprietors of the largest livery, sale and feed stables at Searcy. The senior member of the firm, James L. Moore, is a son of Robert W. and Sally (Carter) Moore, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. In 1858 the father moved to Arkansas and settled in White County, where he died March 24, 1884. His wife still survives him and resides in Cleburne County with her daughter and younger children. James L. Moore came originally from Tennessee, where his birth occurred July 27, 1857. A year after this event his parents moved to White County, Ark., where he has since made his home, gaining by his upright course a wide and honorable acquaintance. He was engaged in farming until 1887, when he moved to Searcy and embarked in the livery business, the patronage accorded this establishment being liberal and of increasing dimensions. Jack F. Lyon, associated with Mr. Moore in the conduct of the stables referred to, was born in Mississippi, on September 5, 1858, as one of a family of William and Lydia (Arnold) Lyman, of Alabama origin. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman moved to Tennessee in 1864, where the former engaged in farming and remained until 1883, then becoming located in Cross County, Ark. Here he died three years later. Jack F. Lyon removed to White County in 1881, and was occupied in stock raising for the following six years. In 1887 he settled at Searcy and entered into the livery business in company with Mr. Moore. Mr. Lyon has two brothers similiarly occupied in Wayne, Cross County, and another brother is engaged in farming in Cross County. Messrs. Moore & Lyman are doing the largest business, in their line, of any firm in Searcy, and are very popular, being affable and obliging in their intercourse with the public.

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M. M. Morris, proprietor of cotton-gin, gristmill and planing-mill, Searcy, Ark. There are few men of the present day whom the world acknowledges as successful, more worthy of honorable mention, or whose history affords a better illustration of what may be accomplished by a determined will and perseverance, than Mr. Morris. He owes his nativity to Kanawha County, W. Va., where his birth occurred February 25, 1828, and is the third in a family of nine children born to the union of P. H. and Ann (Summers) Morris, natives of West Virginia. The father was a miller by trade, but in connection carried on farming, and became the owner of a large plantation. His death occurred in 1842. The mother is still living, makes her home in West Virginia, and is in perfect health, although eighty-three years of age. Their children were named as follows: Floyd W. (married, and resides in West Virginia), Henry (was killed in White County, by a mule, in 1868), M. M. (subject of this sketch), F. T. J. (married, and resides in Garner, White County, Ark.), F. F. (married, and resides in West Virginia), Nancy Jane (now Mrs. Poindexter, of West Virginia), William (married, and resides in West Virginia), George L. (married, and resides near Searcy) and Harriet Ann (now Mrs. Crisp, resides in the Lone Star State). M. M. Morris was reared in a town in West Virginia, received his education in the subscription schools of that State, and there learned the blacksmith trade. On January 13, 1850, he came to Searcy, engaged in blacksmithing in front of the Gill House, and continued there a number of years. Later he erected the first steam-mill in White County, on Red River, near Searcy, and one year later, or in 1851, at Searcy Landing. Mr. Morris ran the mill over one year, and then sold it. He next engaged in cutting wood, and the same year erected a mill and went to work. He was married on October 22, 1852, to Miss M. J. Story, a native of Tennessee, and the daughter of Henry and Annie (Moore) Story, who were originally from Tennessee. Her parents came to Independence County, Ark., settled in Batesville, in 1844, and here the father followed merchandising the principal part of his life. His death occurred in 1845 or 1846, but his wife survived him many years, and made her home with her son, M. M. Morris. She died in 1868. To Mr. and Mrs. [p.212] Morris were born seven children: M. G. (married to Miss Pruitt, and is the father of five children), T. J., W. F., Mary Ellen (widow of Andrew McGinnis), George L., Henry (died in 1875), Charley and Hattie. Mr. Morris lost his excellent wife in April, 1885. He has been continuously in business for nearly forty years, and, although starting with little or no means, he is now one of the successful and progressive men of the county. He owns sixty-eight acres of land joining Searcy; has about 400 acres under cultivation, and has some fine buildings on his farms, one costing $3,300. He has all the latest machinery for running his farm, and follows agricultural pursuits more extensively than any other man in Gray Township. He is not active in politics, but votes with the Democratic party. Socially, he is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M. He takes an active interest in all matters relating to the good of the county, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years. His wife was also a member of the same church. During the late war Mr. Morris was boss workman of a Texas Brigade shop, in Texas Brigade, Col. Taylor's regiment.

George L. Morris, one of the representative men of White County, came to this locality when nineteen years of age. When the war-cry sounded he joined the Confederate army, under Col. McRae, remaining in service until the declaration of peace, mostly on detached duty as wagon master and marshal of trains. After the war he engaged in farming, and, though financially embarrassed when leaving the army, he has, by hard work, good management and economy, become the owner of one of the best farms in White County, 800 acres of land in extent, with 400 of these thoroughly cultivated. Mr. Morris was born in P**** County, W. Va., in 1840, and is the son of Harry and Annie (Summers) Morris, natives of Old Virginia. Mr. Morris, Sr., was a farmer, miller and distiller. He departed this life in 1840, when about forty years old. Mrs. Morris afterward married Richard Chandler, now deceased. She is still living, somewhere in the neighborhood of eighty-nine years, and has been a consistent and faithful member of the Baptist Church for seventy five years. Mr. and Mr. Morris were the parents of nine children, eight of whom are still living: Floyd (a farmer of Putnam County, W. Va.), M. M. (resides in Searcy), William (an attorney of West Virginia), Ferdenand, Nancy (now Mrs. Poindexter), Harriett (now Mrs. Crisp, of Texas) and George L., our subject, who was united in marriage on May 20, 1868, to Sarah Sewell, a daughter of Frank Sewell, and was born in Tennessee on October 6, 1850. They were the parents of nine children, eight of whom are still living: M. M., John W., Eura May, George W., Minnie Lee, Eura, Kate and Henry. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison worship with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which Mr. Morris is steward. To him this society is largely indebted for their church edifice, he furnishing the ground on which it stands, and also a part of the material. He is engaged in raising mules and cattle, which he ships to the Southern markets.

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James R. Neal is a citizen of Centre Hill, popularly and well known as a prosperous farmer of White County. He is a native of Fayette County, Tenn., and was born in 1840, being the son of William D. and Mary A. J. (Parham) Neal, also of Tennessee origin. William D. Neal's birth occurred August 14, 1809, and in business was a prominent planter of Tennessee. He was married August 19, 1831. His father was also a native of Tennessee, who lived and died there. He had a family of eight children: Betsey, Ann, William D. (the father of our subject), Meredith H., James M., Polly, Nancy and John H. Our subject's maternal grandparents, Thomas and Nancy Parham, were natives of Georgia, and came to Tennessee in 1820. William D. Neal was the father of fourteen children: James T., Martha J., John W., William M., James R. (the principal of this sketch), Elica T., Samuel A., Nancy E. (now Mrs. Clay), Sarah A. (Hicks), Eunice M. (Harrison), Susan H. (deceased), David J., next an infant (who died before it was named) and Newton H. Mr. William D. Neal came to Arkansas in 1842, settling in Searcy County, and in 1853 moved to White County, where he bought a farm of 160 acres, all timbered land, and cleared about sixty [p.213] of these. James R. Neal spent his early boyhood on the farm and attended the subscription schools. He was married to Mary J. Holland, a native of North Carolina, as were also her parents and grandparents on both sides. James R., his father and four of his brothers were all in the Confederate service. He enlisted on September 13, 1861, in T. H. McRae's regiment, for twelve months, at the end of which time he enlisted for three years or during the war. He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Helena, Little Rock and many others, and received his discharge June 5, 1865. He was married while in the service and while home on a furlough. After the war he settled on a farm in this county where he has since resided. To this union were born seven children: Alice C. (Brumlow), Kiddee S., Lucy A. (deceased), Mary J. (Harrison), John W., Ella F. and Henry W. Mr. Neal is a Mason, and belongs to Centre Hill Lodge No. 114. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church; he has a fine farm of 160 acres, with fifty improved and in a high state of cultivation. He is a prominent Democrat, and takes an active interest in all public improvements, or all work for the good of the community.

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John H. Neal, Searcy, Ark. This much respected citizen and pioneer came to White County, Ark., in 1850, and settled in Searcy, where he followed merchandising. In 1851 he embarked in the grocery and general merchandising business, and this continued until 1854, he being one of the pioneer business men of Searcy. In 1854 ****e engaged as clerk in dry-goods business houses, and this continued until 1861. He was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1830, being the youngest in a family of nine children, born to James and Sarah (Dodson) Neal, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and South Carolina. The father was a planter, and at an early day moved to Tennessee, where he died, in Fayette County, in 1845. The mother died the same year. In their family were the following children: William D. (married, and came to Arkansas in 1844, settled in Searcy County, and followed farming. He enlisted in Van Buren County, in 1861, and received a gunshot wound through the thigh. He was taken to Camp Dennison, Ohio, remained as a prisoner until exchanged, and returned in 1863; he died in 1869), Meridith H. (came to White County, in 1852, and lost his first wife the same year. He was a Methodist Episcopal, South, preacher, and returned to Memphis in the fall of 1852, taking charge of South Memphis Church. In 1874 he returned to White County, Ark., and in 1877 went to Tennessee, where he died in 1883), James M. (married, came to White County, October, 1850, and settled in what is now Des Ar**** Township, where he opened up a farm. His death occurred in 1852), Nancy (married P. L. Downey and moved to Searcy County, Ark., in 1846. Her death occurred in about 1857 or 1858), Elizabeth L. (married W. R. Johnson and moved to Searcy County, Ark., in 1846. She died in Fulton County, Ark., in 1877), Mary G. (married J. J. Crouch, a Methodist minister, and came to Searcy County, Ark., in 1849. He was a pioneer preacher of that county. Her death occurred in 1850), Martha A. (now Mrs. Evans, the only surviving daughter, lives in Izard County) and an infant named Sarah. John H. Neal was reared to farm life, received his education in the schools of Fayette County, Tenn. He commenced for himself at Searcy, Ark., in business, in 1850, and continued thus employed for some time. He was married in Searcy, Ark., in 1852, to Miss Mary A. Clay, a native of Louisiana, but reared in Missouri, and the daughter of Lewis A. and Mary Clay, natives of Virginia. Her father came to White County, Ark., at an early day and died in Searcy in 1874. The mother died some years before. To Mr. and Mrs. Neal were born five children, three now living: Augustus E. (died in 1887, at the age of thirty-three years), James A. (died in 1865, at the age of ten years), John D. (is a prominent educator, and is teaching in the public school at Newport, Ark., where he has taught for six years), Henry Clay (is married and resides in Corsicana, Texas, and is engaged in commercial pursuits) and Mary A. (who is now Mrs. Hale, resides at Texarkana, Ark.). Mr. Neal lost his wife in November, 1863, and was married again, in White County, in [p.214] 1864, to Mrs. Kiddy A. Neal (nee Holland), a native of North Carolina, and the daughter of Willis B. and Lucinda (Barbee) Holland, natives of Wake County of the same State. The father was a planter by occupation, and in February, 1851, immigrated to Henderson County, Tenn., where he continued his former pursuit, and in connection taught school. In 1852 he came to White County, Ark., resided in Gray Township for three years, and in 1854 moved to Des Ar**** Township, settling where Centre Hill is now located. He sent in the petition and established the postoffice at that place, and was made the first postmaster. In 1860 he moved to Van Buren County, and in 186**** returned to White County, where he remained until 1865, and then moved to Searcy. His death occurred at that place on March 7, 1869. His excellent wife survived him until January 22, 1888. The father was county surveyor, surveyed and resurveyed a great deal of the country. Socially, he was a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., was also a member of Tillman Chapter No. 19, R. A. M., and was High Priest of the same. He was also a member of Searcy Council No. 12, and aided in the organization of Centre Hill-Lodge No. 114. He was a charter member and was Worshipful Master of that lodge. There is a lodge, Holland Lodge No. 158, in Van Buren County, which was named for him. To Mr. Neal's second marriage were born no children. Socially, Mr. Neal is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., and was the second Mason initiated into that lodge, having joined in 1852. He has been a Worshipful Master of the lodge, and assisted in organizing Centre Hill Lodge No. 114, and was Worshipful Master of that. He is a member of Tillman Chapter Lodge No. 19, R. A. M., and has been High Priest in the same. He is also a member of Searcy Council No. 12, and has thrice been Illustrious Master of it. Mr. Neal is a member of the Eastern Star Chapter No. 5, and is one of the representative men of the county. Mrs. Neal is a member of the Eastern Star, has been Worthy Matron several times, and was elected First Grand Matron of the State, in 1876, and served one year. She is a member of the Baptist Church, and he a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and both have been members for thirty-six years. During the war Mr. Neal was postmaster and justice of the peace, and after the war (in 1871) he engaged in the undertaking business, which he has carried on successfully ever since that time.

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John A. Neavill, Searcy, Ark. There are many citizens represented within the pages of this volume, but none more deserving of mention than Mr. Neavill, who is not only one of the pioneers of the county, but is universally respected by all who know him. He was born in Jackson County, Ala., in 1826, and was the eldest in a family of nine children, born to the union of Elihu and Margaret (Jones) Neavill, the father a native of Alabama, and the mother of North Carolina. Elihu Neavill was married in his native State, in about 1825, settled on a claim and followed agricultural pursuits there until 1844, when he came to White County, Ark. He settled near where his son James A. now resides, entered land, erected a tanyard, and in connection carried on farming and the tannery business until his death, which occurred April 17, 1888. He was a resident of the county for over forty years, and had the esteem and respect of all. He was in the Florida War, was orderly-sergeant and was in service twelve months. He was of French descent, and the mother of S****tch-Irish. Of their family the following children are the only ones living: James A. (subject), Elijah (married and resides in Cane Township), William H. (married, and is the marshal of Searcy) and Mary (now Mrs. F. W. Smith, of Gray Township). James A. Neavill was early taught the rudiments of farming, and received his education in the subscription schools of Alabama and White County, Ark. He was eighteen years of age when he came to Arkansas, and he was employed for a number of years in assisting his father in clearing up the farm. After this he began farming for himself near where he now resides. He was married in White County, Ark., in 1853, to Miss Smith, a native of Mississippi, who bore him two living children: John and William B. The latter is married and resides in Gray Township. Another child, Mary, was the wife of [p.215] John Gilliam, and died August 9, 1884. Mrs. Neavill died in 1856, and Mr. Neavill selected his second wife in the person of Mrs. Mary (Barkley) Britt, widow of Mr. Davis Britt, a native of Middle Tennessee, and the daughter of Andrew and Hannah C. (Walker) Barkley. The father was a native of Tennessee, and his ancestors were the earliest settlers of that State. He followed agricultural pursuits and opened up a large tract of land. His death occurred in 1862. The mother was a native of North Carolina, and died in Tennessee, Rutherford County, in 1887, at the advanced age of ninety years. To Mr. and Mrs. Neavill was born one child: Andrew A. After his marriage, which occurred in 1875, Mr. Neavill moved to his present residence, and is now the owner of a good farm of 125 acres, with about seventy acres under cultivation. He is active in politics, and votes with the Democratic party. He is a member of the Agricultural Wheel, takes an active interest in educational matters, and has been a member of the school board. He has also filled the position of constable of his township, and in a highly satisfactory manner. Mrs. Neavill is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Grandfather Neavill was in the War of 1812, and was at the battle of New Orleans with Gen. Jackson. Mr. Neavill (subject of this sketch), came to Arkansas in 1844, and can hardly realize that it is the same country now, on account of the many and rapid changes made since that time. Searcy was in the woods, and there were but three houses between that town and Beebe. Off the main traveled roads there were no settlements, and Mr. Neavill has killed many a deer on land now under cultivation, at a distance of 175 yards. He still has in his possession his trusty gun. During the war he was with Gen. Price, in his raid through Missouri, and enlisted in Capt. Black's company, participating in the following battles: Pilot Knob, Ironton, Newtonia, Blue Gap, etc. He was with Gen. Price until reaching Fayetteville, Ark., when he returned to White County.

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Charles E. Newman, farmer, fruit grower and educator of White County, Ark., was born in Madison County, Ill., on Feburary 17, 1844, and is the eldest of six children born to William E. and Martha A. (Harrison) Newman, the former a native of Madison County, Ill., the latter originally of Kentucky. William E. was also of a family of six children. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, and one of the early settlers of Illinois, locating in the territory as early as 1804. They trace their family name back five generations to Ireland. William E. Newman lived and died in the county in which he was born. His birth occurred in February, 1821, was married in 1843, and died June 17, 1886. He and his wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and became the parents of the following named children**** Charles E. (the subject of this sketch), Eliza (now Mrs. Fields, living near the old homestead), Mary (Kimball, now deceased), Henry (still living near the old homestead), Ida (deceased) and Mattie (married October 5, 1887, now living in Montgomery County, Ill.). The mother of these children still resides at the old home, and is a daughter of William and Mary (McClure) Harrison, Virginians, who at an early day removed to Kentucky, in which State she was born, being one of four children: Maria, Martha, Elizabeth and Benjamin. Charles E. obtained his education in the common schools of Illinois, and assisted his father on the farm. August 9, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Col. R. M. Moore, and went to the front to do battle for his country, participating in a number of battles and skirmishes during his three years' service. He received his discharge June 3, 1865, and upon returning home, commenced teaching school in the same room he left three years before to wear the blue. After spending two years teaching, he took Horace Greeley's advice and went West, locating near Paola, Miami County, Ka****., again engaging as a pedagog****e, remaining in the same school seven years. He was married November 9, 1871, to Amanda L. Porter, daughter of John and Amanda (Hampton) Porter, people from Ohio, in which State Mrs. Amanda Newman was born June 11, 1849. Mr. Newman was engaged in horticulture in Kansas, in connection with teaching, but [p.216] the grasshopper scourge of 1874 caused him to return to Illinois, where an educator received better pay and a longer school term. He followed teaching until 1884, when, September 3, of that year, he came to Arkansas, and settled at Judsonia, where he has followed farming, fruit growing and teaching. He has sixty-five acres of good second bottom land under cultivation, devoted to general farming and fruit growing. He takes an active interest in the political issues of the day. In religious faith himself and wife are Cumberland Presbyterians. They have three children: Lillian (born September 3, 1872), Edna (born September 26, 1877) and Ethel

(born February 3, 1887).

Elijah B. Norvell. Although in his active career through life Mr. Norvell has not amassed the wealth which has fallen to the lot of many others, yet he is in comfortable circumstances, and has gained to an unlimited extent the confidence and esteem always awarded integrity, honor and industry. His birth occurred in Bedford County, Tenn., April 5, 1841, and is a son of David and Martha (Bomar) Norvell, who were also born in that State, and were of Scotch-Irish and Dutch descent. By occupation the father was a farmer, and for several years he served his county as bailiff and deputy sheriff. He died in the State of his birth in 1858, his wife dying at her home in White County, Ark., in 1869. Their children are: David (a physician of Johnson County), Elijah B., B. B. (a farmer of Texas), Mary (wife of Charles Devers, a farmer of Johnson County), William (a farmer of Boone County), R. H. (a mechanic of Texas) and Martha (wife of James Holiday, of Johnson County). Like the majority of farmers' boys, Elijah B. Norvell was compelled to work hard in his youth, and received very little schooling, but being possessed of a bright intellect, and through his own exertions he obtained a very good general knowledge of the world of books. In 1861, when he was in his nineteenth year, he joined the army, enlisting in Company B, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and during his service of nearly three years, he was in the battles of Shiloh, Hoover's Gap, Tullahoma and others, being wounded in the first-named engagement. After his return home he worked as a railroad hand for about three years, then engaged in the liquor business in Tennessee, continuing one year, and in 1866 came to Arkansas, conducting the same business at Stony Point a year longer. Since that time he has been engaged in farming, the first two years renting land, after which he purchased a farm of forty acres on Bull Creek, which he improved and four years later sold. In 1886 he purchased eighty acres of his present farm, and now has 120 acres, of which fifty-five are under cultivation. The soil is fertile, and is well adapted to raising corn, cotton, oats and all kinds of fruit. He has given considerable attention to experimental farming, trying different kinds of seeds and fertilizers, and has succeeded far beyond his expectations, and the past year had perhaps the best cotton in Union Township. In 1881 he purchased property in Beebe, and was a resident of that town for three years in order to give his children the benefit of the city schools, but farm life being more congenial to his tastes, he has since lived in the country. He has been a member of Lodge No. 35 of the Union Wheel ever since its organization, and in 1885 was a delegate to the National Wheel, which met at Little Rock, and to the State Wheel, which convened at the same time and place. Although formerly a Democrat in politics, he has been a member of the Union Labor party for the last few years. In 1869 he was married to V. A. Mossey, a native of Shelby County, Tenn., and a daughter of Jerry Mossey, a farmer and later a merchant of Beebe. Of a family of seven children born to them, four are now living: Robert H. (who is at present attending the schools of Beebe, and is in every respect an exemplary young man, was born in October, 1871), Virginia (was born in 1878), George's birth occurred in 1880, and Ruth was born in 1883. Mr. Norvell and his family worship in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he has filled the office of steward.

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T. J. Oliver, farmer and stock raiser, Searcy, Ark. A lifetime of hard, earnest endeavor in pursuing the occupation to which he now gives his attention, coupled with strict integrity, honesty of purpose and liberality in directions, have had a result to place Mr. Oliver among the truly respected [p.217] and honored agriculturists of the county. To this he has continually added improvements of a high order, until now about the place everything is in excellent condition. He was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1833, was the eleventh in a family of thirteen children born to Hezekiah and Mahala (Shumac) Oliver, natives of the Old Dominion. The father was a tiller of the soil, and in 1820 moved to Maury County, Tenn., where he entered land, and made that his home a number of years. Later he moved to West Tennessee, where his death occurred in 1867. His wife died about 1848. He was in the War of 1812. T. J. Oliver was reared to farm life, and received his education in the schools of Tennessee. When it became necessary for him to start out in life for himself, he very naturally and wisely chose the occupation to which he had been reared, and from that time to the present his success has been such as only a thorough acquaintance with his calling and years of experience might lead him to achieve. At the age of twenty-one he commenced farming in Madison County, Tenn., and purchased a timber tract, which he improved. He was married in Gibaon County, Tenn., in 1860, to Miss Mary E. Scott, a native of Arkansas, born in Fayetteville, and received her education at the Memphis (Tenn.) State Female Academy. She is the daughter of Dr. Scott, who was assassinated at Memphis in 1864. After his marriage Mr. Oliver settled in Madison County, and in 1861 enlisted in the Twelfth Tennessee Infantry for twelve months, from Gibson County, Tenn., and participated in a number of skirmishes. On account of ill health he was discharged in 1862, and returned to Tennessee, where he engaged in farming. In 1883 he came to White County Ark., purchased an improved farm of 100 acres, with eighty under cultivation, and on this has many good buildings. He is not very active in politics, but votes with the Democratic party at State elections. He is a member of the L. O. O. F. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; he has been Sunday-school superintendent for six years, and is one of the progressive men of the town. To his marriage were born these children: Edgar (married, and resides at Greer, Ark.), Benetta (now Mrs. Witt, of Conway), Roland C., Eugene, Wilber, Herbert Earl and Bertram.

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William De Berry Overstreet, now residing on Section 34, Caldwell Township, White County, Ark., is a son of William and Caroline (Jumper) Overstreet, the father a native of South Carolina, and of English ancestors. His forefathers probably came to America before the War for Independence. The maternal ancestors were of English-German descent. The parents of our subject were married November 28, 1832, in Alabama, came to Arkansas in 1860, located near Little Red postoffice, in Harrison Township, and there rented land and farmed until 1864, when they moved to Caldwell Township. Here they still continued to till the soil and here the father died October 28, 1832. Their family consisted of the following children: Samuel D. H., David J., Elicas S., Mary Ann, John H., Martha H. C., Eliza F., William De Berry, Dora A. and Paralee J. All the children were born in Tishomingo County, Miss., with the exception of Paralee, and all grew to maturity with the exception of her. William De Berry Overstreet comes of a long-lived race, some of his ancestors living to be over ninety years of age. He was born October 19, 1850, and his educational advantages were enjoyed in the subscription schools of White County. He attended part of a term near what is now known as Little Red Postoffice, also part of a term at Clear Water, then Clear Springs school-house, the whole time of attendance not being more than two months. Mr. Overstreet is a diligent reader, is observing, and is probably better posted on the majority of subjects than many who have had better educational advantages, having made the best use of his opportunities. At the time of the death of his father he was the only son at home, his brothers being away in the Confederate army, and the support of the family, consisting of the mother and three sisters, devolved upon his shoulders until 1865. Then his brother, John H., returned from the war and took part of the duties upon himself for about a year. By the end of that time he was married and the duties again fell upon the shoulders of William, [p.218] who took care of his sisters until they were married. He is now the counsellor of the family. Mrs. Eliza F. Gordon lost her husband in 1878 and was left with four helpless children, but Mr. Overstreet again came to the assistance, and Mrs. Gordon is now living upon his farm and receives help from him. Her children are now almost large enough to contribute toward her support. October 28, 1870, Mr. Overstreet was united in marriage to Gabriella Lumpkin, a native of Jackson County, born in February, 1857, and the daughter of George W. and Sarah (Martin) Lumpkin, who died when their daughter was but a child. She was then taken by her uncle, Hoyden Edwards, with whom she lived until her marriage. To this union have been born ten children, five of whom are now living: William David (born September 13, 1871), Mary Anna (born May 1, 1873), Dora Lee (born January 7, 1875, and died September 18, 1878), Lula May (born February 20, 1877), Laura Della (born February 10, 1879), Mattie Maud (born February 22, 1881), John Marvin (born October 29, 1885) and three infants, who died unnamed. Mr. Overstreet made his first purchase of land in 1871, and this consisted of 160 acres. He has made all the improvements on his farm, and has one of the most comfortable and home-like places in the county. He has three dwellings on his farm, one occupied by his aged mother and another by Mrs. Gordon. He has good barns, cribs, sheds, etc., and is a thrifty, industrious farmer. He also has a fine peach orchard, which supplies the family with this luscious fruit, and also leaves a surplus for the market. He raises principally cotton, corn, oats and grass. He has a fine grade of cattle, being a cross between the Durham and the native stock, and is also raising some fine hogs, a cross between the Poland-China, the Berkshire and the Chester White, which experience has taught him is a very profitable venture. In politics Mr. Overstreet is a Democrat, but has never been an office seeker. In his religious belief he is a Methodist, and has been a member of that church for twenty-two years. He is a liberal supporter of schools, churches and all laudable enterprises, and is much respected by all acquainted with him. Mrs. Overstreet is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Rev. William M. Owen, pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church, Shady Grove, one mile from Bald Knob, is a native of Tennessee, and a son of Felix and Permelia H. (Plant) Owen, of Kentucky and Alabama origin, respectively. Felix Owen came from Kentucky to Fayette County, Tenn., when a young man, and remained there until 1849, when he again moved with his family to Arkansas and located in White County, when the country was but sparsely settled, and with the aid of his family cleared up a farm, on which he lived until a few years before his death (which occurred in 1883, at the age of seventy-four), when he removed to Judsonia. Mrs. Owen is still living at this place and is the mother of eight children, six of whom are living: William M. (our subject), Sarah C. (wife of Rev. E. T. Church), Robert H. (in business in Judsonia), Green B. (a Baptist minister of this county, also engaged in farming), Elizabeth and Melinda (wife of John O. Kelley, of this county). Rev. William M. Owen was born in Fayette County, Tenn., on October 29, 1839, and was educated at the common schools and by self-study at home, and when arriving at the age of manhood (twenty-one), began life as a farmer. In June, 1861, he joined the Third Arkansas Cavalry, remaining in this company until the close of the war, having had part in the battles of Corinth (where he was taken prisoner and held captive at St. Louis and Alton, Ill., for four months), Chickamauga, Atlanta, and many others. After the war he returned home and again commenced farming, in which he has ever since been engaged. In 1867 he joined the Missionary Baptist Church, and in ten years thereafter (1877) was licensed to preach, and the following year was ordained, and since his ordination he has been faithfully engaged in preaching the Gospel, having under his charge three or four churches at a time, and has also been instrumental in organizing a number of new churches, among them the one at Bald Knob. In 1866 he was married to Miss Laura Coffman, a native of Alabama, who died in 1875. She was the mother of four children, only two surviving [p.219] her: Leander and Mark. In 1877 he was married the second time, to Mrs. Edwards (nee Patty), a widow. They are the parents of three

children : Gracie M., Willie E. and Edith M. Mrs. Owen, with her two oldest children, belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.

Littleberry B. Parker is a prominent farmer of White County, and first saw the light of day in Northampton County, N. C., on February 8, 1831, and is a son of Saul and Miriam (Hicks) Parker. Saul Parker was born in England and came over to this country when a boy, and participated in the War of 1812 at Craney Island. He subsequently located at Norfolk, Va., and later removed to North Carolina, where he died in 1835, while yet comparatively a young man. He was a brick-mason by trade. His wife was a native of North Carolina and was the mother of seven children, four of whom are still living: Samuel (a farmer and ex-sheriff of Jasper County, Miss.), Tabitha T. (wife of Jesse Lassiter of Northampton, N. C.), Jacob J. (a farmer and brick-mason, of Lonoke County) and L. B. (our subject). After the death of her husband, Mrs. Parker removed with her family to Calloway County, Ky., subsequently to Madison County, Tenn., and in 1852 came to Arkansas locating in Lonoke County, where she died in 1881, at the age of eighty-four years, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. L. B. Parker remained with his mother until eight years of age, when he was bound out to James B. Wheeler, a cabinet-maker and farmer of Northampton County, N. C., with whom he remained until Mr. Wheeler's death, which occurred four years later, when he was hired out to a farmer for $1 per month, part of which was to be paid him in money and the balance in clothes. He remained there one year and was then (1844) hired out for a year for $10 for the year, but quit in April and joined an emigrant train and worked his way to Kentucky, where he found employment at $5 per month, and remained there until 1847 when he went to Madison County, Tenn., where he was engaged as a mail-carrier during the year 1847. He then farmed for a short time, after which he was employed on a flat-boat running to New Orleans. One year later he came to Arkansas, locating in White County. At the outbreak of the war he joined the Confederate army in the Fourth Battalion Arkansas Infantry. He served until the surrender of Island No. 10, when his battalion was the only one which escaped by wading back through the water twelve miles to the boat, which they carried to Fort Pillow. Mr. Parker becoming disabled received his discharge at Corinth. He then returned to Arkansas and located in Prairie County, but after the cessation of hostilities he came back to White County locating on the farm which he now calls home, and which was then in the woods. He is the owner of 320 acres, with 100 under cultivation. In January, 1852, he was married to Miss Hannah E. Longmire, who was born on March 22, 1839. Mr. and Mrs. Parker never had any children of their own, but have reared three orphan children: George W. and James Coleman and Mary F. (who is now the wife of William Tidwell). Mrs. Parker is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Parker has taken the Council degree in the Masonic order, and has represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of the State several times. He is a strong Democrat and a respected and valuable citizen.

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John T. Patterson is one of the well-to-do and successful agriculturists of White County, Ark., and although he has only resided here since 1881, coming from Tennessee, he has become well and favorably known. His birth occurred in Franklin County, Ala., in 1834, and he was the third of a family of nine children born to James and Catherine Gray) Patterson, the former born in the "Old North State" and the latter in the "Keystone State." James Patterson went to Alabama when the country was new, and opened a plantation which he afterward sold, moving thereafter to Hardeman County, Tenn., with his wife, whom he married in Alabama. They settled on a farm in Tennessee in 1844, and here the father spent his declining years, his death occuring in 1873. He served in the Seminole War. His wife passed from life in 1888. Their children are: Mary Jane (Mrs. Ethridge, resides in Tennessee), William (lives in Kentucky), John T., Hugh (residing in [p.220] Conway County, Ark.), Jacob (who died in Tennessee, in 1863), Joseph (who also died in that State in the same year) and Enoch and Franklin (both residents of Tennessee). Joseph Gray, the maternal grandfather, was born in England, and served in the Revolutionary War. John T. Patterson spent his youthful days in attending school and in farm work, and after attaining his twentieth year he began working for himself. He was married in McNairy County, in 1855, to Miss Emeline Brown, a native of North Carolina, and a daughter of Isaac and Millie (Dunn) Brown, who were born, reared and married in the State of North Carolina. In 1844 they removed to McNairy County, where they settled on a farm, on which the mother died, in 1855. The father moved to Bell County, Tex., in 1858, and there is now making his home. From the time of his marriage until 1858, Mr. Patterson lived in Tennessee, then spent two years in Texas, after which he returned to McNairy County. On March 4, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, United States army to defend the Constitution of the United States, but left his wife and two children in the South, with little hope of ever returning to them, but through the kind providence of God returned to them in safety. He was wounded at Shiloh on April 6, 1862, and was confined in the hospital at Savannah, Tenn., for some time, being honorably discharged on July 31, 1862, after which he returned to his home and resumed farming. Since 1881 he has been the owner of 160 acres of land in White County, Ark., and has fifty under cultivation. He is an active supporter of the Republican party, and not only has he been a prominent supporter of schools, but he is a member of the school board. Socially, he is a member of Rock Springs Lodge No. 422 of the A. F. & A. M., of which lodge he has been Worshipful Master for some years. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and are the parents of the following children: Green Harrison (deceased), Melissa (Mrs. Martindale), Alice (Mrs. Holmes), Isabelle (Mrs. Stringfellow), Arca (Mrs. Langley), Elizabeth, Cordelia, Elzora, Cora Lee and Florence. Two children died in infancy.

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Rev. J. A. Pemberton is an elder of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and by occupation is a farmer, and being one of the old settlers of White County, has figured prominently in public affairs. His native county is Wilson, Tenn., where he was born on December 13, 1825, and is the only one now living of a family of five daughters and three sons born to Thomas J. and Mary (McHaney) Pemberton, who were born in Virginia in 1804 and 1800, respectively. They were married about 1822, and followed the occupation of farming, both being members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Pemberton took part in the Creek and Florida War, and assisted in the removal of the Creek and Seminole Indians to the western reserves. He died February 26, 1871, and his wife in August, 1861. The Pemberton family came to the New World prior to 1700, from their native country, England, and settled in Virginia, and the great-grandfather was one of four sons of the first settler. When the Revolutionary War came up the grandfather Pemberton was only twelve years of age, so of course did not take part in that struggle. He was one of the first settlers of Tennessee, and in this State reared his family, his son, Thomas J., being a relative of Gen. Pemberton of the Southern army, in the late Civil War. Andrew McHaney, the maternal grandfather, was born in Ireland, and as a boy joined the American army and took part in the Revolutionary War, serving from the beginning until the close. He was in Col. William Washington's command, and was present at the battle of Cowpens and witnessed the personal encounter between Washington and Tarleton, in which the latter fled with a sword gash in his hand. After the war was over he settled in Tennessee, where he became a wealthy planter, and died at the age of sixty-five years. Rev. J. A. Pemberton, our subject, attended subscription school in the old-fashioned log-houses of his day, and at the age of twenty-one years began an independent career. In 1846 he married Miss Sarah C. Harrison, and with her removed to Arkansas in 1857 and entered 160 acres of land a few miles northwest of where Beebe now is. When the war came up he, in July, 1861, enlisted in the Tenth Arkansas Infantry, and [p.221] was made captain of a company which he had assisted in organizing. While in the infantry service he participated in the battle of Shiloh, but in the latter part of 1862 he became a member of the cavalry, and was at Helena, Little Rock, Pine Bluff, Pilot Knob, and was with Price until that General's command was divided at Fayetteville, in 1864. The same year he was captured at Augusta, and was held a prisoner of war until peace was declared. After his return home he continued to farm near Antioch until 1879, then came to Beebe to live. He became a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1865, and since 1874 has been a minister of that denomination and has preached in Beebe and vicinity. He has been a very active worker for the cause of his Master and has expounded the doctrine of his denomination in nearly all the principal churches of White County. He was a member of the General Assembly that met at Bowling Green, Ky., in 1876, and for the last two years has been the representative of the Arkansas Synod. He has never been an office seeker, but since his residence in Beebe has been a member of the board of aldermen, and during the reconstruction period was a member of the board of supervisors of White County. He is a Royal Arch Mason and is a member of Beebe Lodge No. 145. He and wife have never had any children of their own, but have given homes to a number of orphan children, and have reared three from infancy. Mrs. Pemberton is a daughter of J. P. and Ann C. (Sweeney) Harrison, who were born in Virginia, the former of whom was an active soldier in the War of 1812.

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Joshua W. Pence, and old settler and prominent citizen, of White County, and postmaster of Egbert, is of Tennessee nativity, and a son of George J. and Rebecca (Webb) Pence, natives of South and North Carolina, respectively. George J. Pence was born in 1802, and was married in Alabama in 1825, and remained there until 1829, when he removed to Warren County, Tenn., and six years later to Williamson County of that State. In 1839 he immigrated to Wilson County, where he died in 1852. He was a member of the Christian Church and a man of decision and strong will power, and was an old-time Jacksonian Democrat. Mrs. Pence was born in 1806, and in 1855, after her husband's death, came to Arkansas, locating in White County, on the farm on which our subject now lives, and where she died on July 16, 1888. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and was the mother of thirteen children, three of whom are still living: Louisa (widow of William Allen), Joshua W. (the principal of this sketch) and Marion T. (a farmer of Prairie County). Joshua W. was born in Warren County, Tenn., May 18, 1830, and when twenty-two years of age, commenced farming for himself, which occupation he has since followed, and in 1855 commenced farming the place on which he still lives, his mother living with him during the last twenty years of her life. He now has a fine farm of 252 acres, with about seventy-five under cultivation. In June, 1862, he enlisted in the Eighth Arkansas Infantry, but remained only a short time, being discharged on account of disability. Upon his discharge he returned home and found his farm in a state of dilapidation. In 1866 he was elected justice of the peace, which office he held for sixteen consecutive years, and was appointed postmaster of Egbert in February, 1887, which position he is still holding. He was married in February, 1854, to Miss Damaris L. Grissom, a native of Tennessee, who died in 1874, leaving nine children, six of whom are still living: Matilda (now Mrs. Hood), George L. (farmer and justice of the peace, of Dogwood Township), Oren D., Oscar D., Ira R. and Lillie a. Those deceased are Wiley H., Joshua M. and Barbara E. In 1874 he was again married to Mrs. Freeman (nee Belton, a widow, and who died in 1883, leaving no children), and on December 19, 1888, he married his third and present wife, Mrs. Ellen M. Rimer (nee Strodder, also a widow). Mr, Pence and wife are members of the Christian Church. He is a prominent Democrat and a member of the Knights of Labor, and of the County Wheel. He joined the Freemasons in July, 1867, of which he is still a member in full fellowship,in West Point Lodge No. 24. December 23, 1878, he joined the Grange No. 137, and has since filled several prominent offices in that society, such as Master, Overseer, [p.222] Chaplain, Steward, etc. He and wife also belong to the Famous Life Association of Little Rock, Ark., their policy of membership being limited to the amount of $3,000.

N. B. Pettey. Among the early settlers of White County was our subject, N. B. Pettey, who came to this county with his widowed mother in 1855. Mr. Pettey was a son of George G. and Annie E. (Chappell) Pettey, natives oSouth Carolina and Virginia, respectively, and was born in Limestone County, Als., August 26, 1839. Mr. George G. Pettey settled in Alabama at an early day, and later moved to Mississippi, where he died in 1850. Five years later his widow moved to Arkansas with her family, where she died in 1861. N. B. Pettey was raised and educated in Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas, and at the age of sixteen went to Hiokman County and engaged in clerking, where he remained two years. In 1856 he came to White County, Ark., landing at Negro Hill in September, where he worked at farm labor in the summer season and attended school in the winter. He then went to Searcy and accepted a position as clerk for W. B. Carter, where he remained until 1861, when he enlisted in July of that year in Company E of the Third Arkansas Cavalry, enlisting for three years, or during the war, as private. Mr. Pettey was in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, and was with Bragg in his invasion of Kentucky, and was in the Georgia campaign. He was captured as a prisoner November 1, 1864, and was taken with Sherman to the coast, and up to Point Lookout, where he was paroled February 21, 1865, and returned and joined his command prior to the battle of Bentonville, N. C. He arrived home at Searcy on June 7, 1865, and took up farming. In 1871 he was elected deputy sheriff, and the following year elected sheriff of the county (White), serving three successive terms. In 1879 Mr. Pettey bought an improved farm of sixty acres, near Centre Hill, and commenced farming, and also engaged in merchandising, which he followed some two or three years. He served as postmaster under President Cleveland's administration. Mr. Pettey was married on September 20, 1866, to Jennie Dannelly, a native of Mississippi, and daughter of Rev. George A. and Annie E. (West) Dannelly, originally of South Carolina and Alabama, respectively. Rev. G. A. Dannelly immigrated to Phillips County, Ark., at an early day, then to Jackson County, where he joined the Methodist Episcopal Conference at Batesville in 1856. He is now in Woodruff County. His wife died in 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Pettey are the parents of two children: George G. and Napoleon B. Mr. Pettey has seen the complete development of the county and has taken an active interest in all work for the good of the community. He is a prominent Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. Mrs. Pettey is a member of the Methodist Church. Her grandfather Dannelly was a member of the Masonic order, of which he held the office of Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the State, and was Grand Lecturer of the State some five or six years, and was District Deputy Grand Master in 1871. He was also prominently connected with the order of the I. O. O. F.

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John Andrew Phelps is a merchant doing business and residing in El Paso, and to him may be applied that often much abused phrase, "self-made man," for he started out in life for himself at the early age of fifteen years, and has attained his present enviable place in business and society. He was born in Haywood County, Tenn., on January 16, 1852, and is one of two children (the other member being J. T. Phelps) born to Philip P. and Arkansas (Overton) Phelps, both of English descent, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Virginia. They were married in Tennessee about the year 1850, and in Hardeman County of this State; the father died eight years later. John Andrew Phelps followed various employments until the year 1875, when he began clerking in a mercantile establishment belonging to D. H. Thorn, of Jonesboro, Ark., and during a three years' stay with this gentleman became thoroughly familiar with all the details of the work. During this time Mr. Thorn was sheriff of the county, and Mr. Phelps acted as his deputy, and in this capacity rendered valuable service. Upon leaving Mr. Thorn he rented land in Craighead County of the Hon. W. H. Cate, who, taking a fancy to our subject, [p.223] gave him an excellent chance and furnished him with stock to till his land. During this time he also acted as foreman of Mr. Cate's cotton-gin, and upon leaving this gentleman, took with him about $500 in money which he had earned. On April 3, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Avey Broadway, by whom he has one child, John Andrew, ho was born on November 30, 1884. In 1879 Mr. Phelps engaged in merchandising in El Paso in company with his brother, J. T. Phelps, and M. L. Booth, under the firm name of Booth & Phelps, continuing in business with those gentlemen until 1882, at which time Mr. Booth withdrew from the firm and the two brothers continued alone under the firm name of Phelps & Bro. This partnership was dissolved in 1883, and the firm then took the name of Phelps & Co., and from 1885 to 1888 Mr. Phelps was in business alone. The firm has since been known as Warren & Phelps, and they carry a large and well-selected stock of general merchandise, and in connection they carry on a harness and saddlery shop, and in this establishment employ none but the best workmen. They are also extensive dealers in cotton, and in the year 1888 they shipped 1,330 bales to St. Louis and Memphis. In invoicing their goods in July, 1889, they found in accounts and stock on hand $40,000, their average stock amounting to $12,000. Mr. Phelps is a Democrat, a member of El Paso Lodge No. 65 of the A. F. & A. M., and in his business relations is shrewd and enterprising. He and wife are rearing a little girl named Mamie Canada, whose mother died in 1881, when she was but two weeks old. Her father is Thomas J. Canada, and her mother was a Miss Ada Booth.

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Joseph T. Phelps is a prosperous merchant of El Paso, Ark., and in his relations with the public has ever proven trustworthy and reliable. By his superior management and rare business ability and efficiency he has done not a littleto advance the reputation the county enjoys as a commercial center, and is well liked and esteemed by all. He was born in Hardeman County, Tenn., June 25, 1854, and is the son of Philip and Arkansas (Overton) Phelps, who were Virginians, but were married in Tennessee, and lived the lives of farmers in that State. The father was an Englishman by descent and was a man who, had he lived, would have become wealthy, but he was cut down in the prime of life, in 1858, at the age of thirty-five years. In 1860 his widow married P. Rainer, a farmer of Tennessee, who came to Arkansas about 1870, and are residing in Craighead County. The mother, as well as her first husband, were members of the Old School Presbyterian Church, but she is now a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Joseph T. Phelps was left fatherless at the age of three years, but was reared to a farm life by his step-father, and in his youth acquired a fair education in the common schools of Tennessee and Arkansas, paying his own tuition. At the early age of fourteen years he began life on his own responsibility, and for about three worked as a farm hand, earning sufficient money to take a course in a higher grade of school. Upon leaving his step-father he could neither read nor write and had very little clothing. He made his home with an uncle, with the agreement that he should work one-half the time and go to school the remainder, but his uncle failed to live up to th contract and he left him. He next made his home with a lady who treated him kindly, and later with a Mr. Turner, who took considerable interest in him, and at the age of sixteen years, through the recommendation of this gentleman, he succeeded in obtaining a good position with a Mr. Parker, of Bolivar, Tenn., and remained with him six months, attending school and working in his store, doing chores to pay for his board. After teaching school for a short time, he obtained a situation as clerk in a dry-goods store at Bolivar at $10 per month, a position which he held for six months; then became newsboy on the Mississippi Central Railroad, continuing for three months. In the fall of 1872 he came to Craighead County and he and his brother bought a house and lot in Jonesboro, and followed the occupation of saw-logging a sufficient length of time to get enough logs to build a house, but the mill burned and their property was lost. Their next bad luck was the discovery that the title to their house and lot, for which they paid $100, was worthless, but nothing daunted, they [p.224] went in debt for forty acres of land, and their first year's crop paid for the property. At the end of one year our subject sold out to his brother and began teaching a subscription school, which was a great success. He next engaged in clerking in a store in Jonesboro, but came to El Paso after a few months, and spent eight months in school at that place. After cutting cord wood for about three months, he hired to M. L. Booth as a farm hand, at $20 a month, working one year. December 21, 1876, he was married to Miss Martha Booth, a daughter of his former employer, and her birth occurred in Haywood County, Tenn. This union has been blessed with six children, four of whom are living: Roberta H. (born August 2, 1878 and died August 2, 1888), Reuben C. (born February 8, 1880), Philip L. (born June 19, 1883, and died December 20, 1884), Joseph H. (born October 15, 1884), Oklahoma (born February 6, 1887) and an infant (born March 29, 1889). After his marriage, Mr. Phelps made one crop on his father-in-law's farm, but in the fall of 1878 he began the mercantile business with a Mr. A. P. Poole, under the firm name of Poole & Phelps. This partnership lasted two years, then Mr. Phelps sold out and engaged in business with M. L. Booth, the firm name being Booth, Phelps & Co., for one year. During his business connection with Mr. Poole, he was appointed postmaster at El Paso, and served in this capacity for six years. He is now engaged in merchandising under the name of M. L. Phelps & Co. His life has been an eventful one, and notwithstanding the many difficulties which have strewn his pathway, he has been successful and is of material benefit to any ommunity in which he resides. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he is a member of El Paso Lodge No. 65 of the A. F. & A. M., in which organization he has held all the offices with the exception of Worshipful Master.

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Wiley D. Plant. Hilary Plant was born in South Carolina, July 7, 1812, and, when quite young, moved to Alabama, where he met and married Mercy Tatum, a native of Alabama. Shortly after his marriage Mr. Plant immigrated to Kentucky, thence to Arkansas, where the remainder of his quiet, uneventful life was passed. Mr. Plant was a stanch Democrat, and a consistent member of the Methodist Church, South, for many years. He was a quiet, law-abiding citizen, charitable, industrious and frugal, and at the date of his death, in 1880, had amassed quite a fortune. Mrs. Plant is now a resident in White County, Ark., aged eighty-five years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Plant ten children were born, five sons and five daughters, four of them now living: Nance B. (widow of George Hamby, of Jackson County), Charles F. (a farmer of White County), Wiley D. (the subject of this sketch), Green L. (a planter of White County), Andrew W. (died in Woodruff County), Robert L. (died in Conway County), Mary A. (widow of George M. Smith, deceased in White County), Susan M. (died in Jackson County) and Sarah F. (wife of N. E. Kidd, died in Woodruff County). Wiley D. Plant was reared in White County, and received excellent advantages for an education, which he was not slow to improve, and is a well-informed man. He is a typical Arkansan, and a native of that State, his birth occurring in Conway (now Faulkner) County, January 19, 1847. He began for himself at the age of twenty-one years, first as a farmer, which was his occupation for a few years, but realizing that his vocation lay in another direction he turned his attention to the mercantile business, in which he has been successful. He located at Bradford, White County, where he is now one of the prominent men of the community. His stock consists of general merchandise, valued at $8,000, and by his courteous manner and straightforward dealing he has established a permanent and lucrative business. Mr. Plant is well worthy the liberal patronage bestowed on him, for he endeavors in every possible way to please his customers, considering their interests his, and the petty, disagreeable traits of so many merchants are entirely foreign to his characteristics and nature. In May of 1885 Mr. Plant led to the hymeneal altar Mrs. Sarah E. Moore, daughter of William and Prudence McKnight. To their union two bright children have been born, Bessie and William D., who, with their childish prattle, make [p.225] the house bright and joyous, and gladden the hearts of their devoted parents. He is a Democrat in politics, takes an active part in the elections, and is a strong partisan. He is a believer in the Methodist faith, though not a member of any denomination. He is a leading citizen, contributes liberally to all public movements; is a prominent personage in his town and community, active and progressive.

Henry W. Pope is a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Cane Township, a native of Georgia, and a son of Micajah and Hattie (Bruce) Pope. Micajah Pope was born in Virginia, November 21, 1808, and was a son of John and Mary (Morris) Pope of Virginia origin, and was married in 1827. John Pope moved to Georgia in 1818, and settled on land where Atlauts now stands. Mrs. Pope, the mother of Henry W., was a daughter of Daniel and Sallie (Prenct) Bruce, who were the parents of eleven children. Our subject was born December 28, 1835, and was married December 27, 1855, to Mollie E. Rea, a daughter of Rev. W. T. Rea and Rhoda (Brown) Rea. Mrs. Rea was a daughter of William and Nancy Pruet. After his marriage Mr. Pope found employment in teaching, following this for several years. All of his brothers were in the Confederate army, and Henry W. was mustered in, but was unable to stand muster, and was discharged. In 1867 he removed to Jefferson County and taught school, and two years later came to White County. In March, 1878, he came to Cane Township, and commenced farming on a quarter-section of unimproved land, and, by his energy, has 100 acres of it under cultivation. To this union have been given twelve children: Sarah F. (now Mrs. Earnest, and the mother of six children), Mollie H. (now Mrs. Langforo, and the mother of two children), William H. (married, and has one child), Mamie (now Mrs. Cagle), John D, (a professor of penmanship), Horace E. (deceased), Ella (deceased), Katie B., Daniel W., Samuel T. (deceased), Albert J. and James E. Mr. Pope is a strong Democrat, and takes an active part in politics, and is now holding the office of justice of the peace of his township. Himself and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He always takes an active interest in the temperance movement.

Frederick R. Price, one of Gen. Price's soldiers in his raid through Missouri, Kansas and Mississippi, is the fifth son of a family of twelve children, born to Russell and Mary (Turner) Price. Bussell Price was the son of Joseph Price, who died in South Carolina in 1833. Russell Price was born in 1790, and was married about 1810, and was the father of the following ten children, and two whose names are not given: Delia, Thomas, Jane, Fielding, Frederick R., Minerva, Mahaley, Joseph, Mary Ann and Nancy. He followed farming in South Carolina, and moved to White County, in 1836, taking up eighty acres of land, and where he died two years later, his wife surviving him until 1844. Frederick R. first saw the light of this world in South Carolina, March 2, 1821, and was married at the age of twenty to Lucinda Jones, a daughter of B. Jones, of Cane Township. After his marriage he commenced farming for himself. By this marriage they had eleven children: John T., Russell, Levi (deceased), Polly (deceased), William (deceased), Sarah J. (deceased), Louisa, Fielding, Lucy C. (deceased), Elizabeth and George W. (deceased). Mr. Price's first wife died in June, 1872. He was married the second time, in 1873, to Ruth J. Taylor (nee Chrisman), widow of W. H. Taylor. She was born in 1831, and was the daughter of Isaac S. and Lucinda (Allen) Chrisman, natives of Lee County, W. Va., who came to White County in 1856, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Price are the parents of one child, Allie O., who was born May 29, 1874. Mr. F. R. Price moved to White County, in 1836, where he has ever since lived. Himself and family belong to the Methodist Church, of which denomination his wife has been a member since eight years of age. He is also a member of the County Wheel, and has been honored with the office of president. In his younger days he was engaged principally in hunting. He is a highly respected citizen, and always has the good of his community at heart.

 

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Amaziah M. Price is what might be called a life resident of White County, having been born [p.226] on the farm which he now calls home, and where he has always lived. It is a fine tract of 240 acres, 100 of which are under cultivation. Joseph R. Price, the father of A. M. Price, was a native of South Carolina, and was a son of Russell and Sarah (Turner) Price, both of South Carolina origin. Mr. Price was married in March, 1846, in White County, to Martha Guthery, a daughter of Joseph and Susie (Wood) Guthery, also natives of South Carolina. To their union were born seven children: Mary A. (deceased), A. M. (our subject), Arva J. (now Mrs. Chumbley), Carrel A., Rhodie J. (married James Hodges, of this county), Monroe and Susan (who married William Chumley). Mr. Price died in 1860, and his wife some ten years later. A. M. Price was born on November 13, 1849, received a common-school education, and was married in 1882 to Miss Susan M. Taylor, a daughter of James M. and Maggie J. (Barker) Taylor. Mr. Taylor is originally from Tennessee, and a son of Alexander and Margaret (Davis) Taylor. Mrs. Taylor was a daughter of Alexander and Margaret (Dodson) Barker. Mr. and Mrs. Price are the parents of two daughters: Lenna (born September 14, 1883) and Bertha (born November 21, 1885). He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Baptist Church. Mr. Price is a strong Democrat, politically, and takes an active interest in all work for the good of the community.

 

Carroll A. Price. A glance at the notes from which this sketch has been prepared indicates at once that the mercantile career of Mr. Price has been one of ceaseless activity, and that he has been successful is well known. His parents, Joseph and Mary (Guthrie) Price, were of French and Scotch descent, and were born in North and South Carolina, respectively. After their marriage they came to Arkansas, and became farmers of White County. The father died in 1859 and the mother in 1866, their union having been blessed in the birth of seven children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood: Mary Ann (was born in 1846, was married to M. J. H. Jenkins, but was left a widow with six children in 1887), A. M. (was born in 1848, married Miss Susan Taylor, a native of Tennessee, and has two children), Zennance (was born in 1850, and was married to J. M. Couch, by whom she has two children), Carroll A. (our subject, was the fourth child), Rhoda J. (was born in 1852, became the wife of J. S. Hodges, of Mississippi, and is the mother of seven children), Monroe (was born in 1856, married Nancy Gibson, a native of North Carolina, and by her has four children), Susan (born in 1858, married to W. T. Chumley, of Illinois, and has two children). The paternal great-grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Carroll A. Price was born November 13, 1852, and was educated in the private schools of White County, and attended a male academy for two terms, paying his way through this institution with money earned by industry, perseverance and economy. In 1874 he became a salesman for his uncle, Nelson Guthrie, in Pope County, but at the end of one year returned to White County, and engaged in farming and stock dealing, which calling he continued to pursue until 1878, then came to Beebe and engaged as a clerk with D. C. Harris, with whom he remained until 1880. The following year he formed a partnership with J. M. Liles in general merchandising in the town of Beebe, and successfully conducted business at that place until 1887, when they dissolved partnership, Mr. Liles buying Mr. Price's interest. The latter invested his money in real estate, but in the spring of 1887 went east and purchased an excellent line of general merchandise, his stock being now valued at $10,000, and he controls a large share of the patronage of town and county. On September 17, 1883, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary G. Gibbs, of Arkansas, their marriage taking place in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in Beebe, Rev. R. T. Wylie officiating. They have two children: Cecil (born July 30, 1884) and Cuthbert A. (born December 7, 1887), In his political views Mr. Price is a liberal Democrat, and he and wife are earnest members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of Beebe. He is progressive in his views, and contributes liberally to all religious, social, educational and political interests.

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[p.227] L. M. Pyles, a prominent fruit and vegetable-grower of Judsonia, was born in Maryland, near Washington, D. C., in 1849, and was the eldest son in a family of thirteen children given to William V. and Margaret A. (Ryan) Pyles, also owning Maryland as their native State. Mr. William V. Pyles was a son of William and Massie (Allen) Pyles, who was born in 1825 and was married in 1847 to Margaret A. Ryan, daughter of William and Sarah (Kingsburry) Ryan, of Maryland. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Pyles were born the following children: L. M. (our subject), Anna S. (deceased), Laura V. (now Mrs. Allen), Emma J. (married Bud Ball), Maggie (now Mrs. Stewart), Fannie (married Robert Padgett), Amanda (Mrs. Middleton), Lucy (now Mrs. Langley), Jennie, William H. and Thornton, Mr. L. M. Pyles was married in 1877 to Laverna Clark, daughter of Alfred and Mary Clark, who were of Ohio origin. After his marriage Mr. Pyles moved to Cincinnati, and thence to Warren County, Ohio, where he started in business as a butcher, which he followed for seven years. His wife died in 1881, in Warren County, leaving two children: Mary M. and William L. After the death of his wife Mr. Pyles returned to Maryland, remaining in that State but a short time, and then came back to Ohio and located in Darke County, where he was married the second time, in Greenville, in 1884, to Almeda Good, daughter of Samuel and Margaret Good, of Ohio. The year following he removed to White County, Ark., and located in Judsonia, where he made the raising of fruit and vegetables a business for two years, and then opened a meat market, in which business he continued for a limited time, and again took up the employment of growing fruit and vegetables, giving his principal attention to the raising of the strawberries, which he ships to northern markets. Mr. and Mrs. Pyles are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also connected with the I. O. O. F., holding the office of Noble Grand. Mr. Pyles is a strong Republican and a member of the town council. He owns some property in Judsonia, and is widely known and highly respected as a citizen. His father was one of the three men who were allowed to cross the Potomac on the night of President Lincoln's assassination.

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Thomas Jefferson Quick. Since commencing life for himself Mr. Quick has given his attention to two callings, that of farming and stock raising, and in these enterprises has met with well merited success, for he is not only progressive in his views, but is intelligent and thoroughly posted in all public affairs. He was born February 11, 1842, and is a son of Nathan and Peney Emeline (Hubbard) Quick, the father, being in all probability, of Spanish descent, his birth occurring in the "Palmetto State." The mother was a Georgian, and her union with Mr. Quick resulted in the birth of nine children, eight attaining manhood and womanhood: Nancy Melissa (was born in 1838, and was married to W. R. T. Singleton, of Mississippi), William (was born in 1840, and died in 1852), Thomas Jefferson (the subject of this memoir), Martha Adeline (born in 1844, was married to J. M. Butler, of Mississippi, in 1865), Eliza Permelia (born in 1846, wedded to L. R. Butler, of Mississippi, in 1865), James Robert (born in 1848, espoused Miss Mary Allen, of Mississippi, and died in Arkansas, in 1882), Mercy F. (born in 1850, married James E. Timms, of Mississippi), Sarah Ellen (born in 1852, wedded Thomas Hill, also of Mississippi), Amanda R. (born in 1854, became the wife of J. H. Roberts, a Mississippian), Matthew Isom's birth occurred in 1856, and he took for his wife Miss Evaline Summons. Mr. Quick, the gentleman whose name heads this sketch, received his education in the subscription schools of his native county (La Fayette County, Miss.), and has been familiar with farm work from his earliest boyhood. This work continued to receive his attention until he had attained his seventeenth year, when, with the enthusiasm of youth, he enlisted as a private in Company F, Nineteenth Regiment Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, the first battle in which he participated being Williamsburg. On March 3, 1865, he was captured at Petersburg, Va., and taken to Hart's Island, N. Y., where he was kept in confinement for two months and a half. On being paroled he went to New York City, embarking there on a steamer for New Orleans, going [p.228] from there up the Mississippi River to Memphis, from there by rail to La Fayette Station, thence on foot to Oxford, Miss., a distance of seventy miles, to his father's plantation, two miles east of

that place, arriving at home May 6, 1865. He assisted his father on the farm for two years, and on January 6, 1867, wedded Miss Mary A. Callaway, of Georgia, and started out in life for himself, November 18, 1869, he came to Arkansas, and settled in White County, residing for one year on a farm he had purchased, then sold out and removed to Van Buren County, and after purchasing a saw-mill near Quitman, operated it for one year. Being dissatisfied with this location, he resolved to return to White County, and here purchased a farm, comprising 320 acres, all wild land. He resided on this until 1884, then sold it, having in the meantime made many valuable improvements, among which was the clearing and putting under cultivation of 120 acres of land. In 1884 he took up his abode in El Paso, but in 1885 purchased his present farm, consisting of 106 acres, on which was an incompleted house and fair stables. He has since completed the house, and has erected a cotton-gin, which has a capacity of six bales per day. On May 4, 1880, his wife died, and September 7, 1881, he married Sallie E. Crosby, of the State of Arkansas, and to them were born two children: Lawrence Bernard (born June 28, 1882, and died October 31, 1882), Clarence Leonard (born June 28, 1882, and died August 12, 1889). The mother of these children died October 17, 1884, and June 21, of the following year, Mr. Quick took for his third wife Mrs. Elizabeth (Arnold) Griffin, a daughter of John and Cynthia (Smith) Arnold, the father about one-fourth Cherokee Indian, and the mother of Irish descent. The following children have been born to Mr. Quick's last marriage: Thomas Fletcher (born July 16, 1886) and Quro (born October 26, 1888). At the present writing Mr. Quick owns 200 acres of land, with eighty acres under cultivation. His land has on it a fine peach and plum orchard, and a vineyard of about 100 vines. Mr. Quick is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and also of El Paso Lodge No. 65, A. F. & A. M.

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William C. Rainey is an extensive planter and cotton-ginner of Union Township, and was born in Madison County, Tenn., in 1829, being a son of Isaac and Parthena (Rainey) Rainey, who were also people of Middle Tennessee. The father was a farmer by occupation, and a son of Zebulon Rainey, a soldier in the War of 1812. Both parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died in Middle Tennessee, after rearing a family of six children: William C., Theophilus (who died in youth), Addison Levi (a farmer of West Tennessee), Samuel (a farmer of West Tennessee), James W. (of Lauderdale County, Tenn.), Henderson A. (of Haywood County, Tenn.), Delicia F. (widow of Joseph L. Hendron, of Tenn.), Amanda (wife of W. Coffman, a merchant of Woodville, Tenn.), Elizabeth (who died at the age of four years), and Martha (who died in 1856, aged eighteen years). William C. Rainey began life for himself when twenty-two years of age, and after working one year as a farm hand and from that time up to 1858 was an overseer. In the fall of 1856 he was married to Elizabeth Coffey, a daughter of Rev. D. P. Coffey of Tennessee, and by her has had a family of eleven children, eight of whom are living: James D. (who was born November 25, 1857), Mary F. (wife of Jeff Walker, was born May 14, 1860), Leonidas E. (was born January 12, 1866), William J. (born February 29, 1868). Thomas (born October 7, 1870), Samuel (born November 30, 1872), Jesse C. (born March 4, 1874), Joseph L. (born December 27, 1879), and Eddie (born February 27, 1877). On December 20, 1854, Mr. Rainey first set foot in White County, Ark., and for two years he acted as overseer for one of the well-to-do planters of this region. After his marriage he moved to Hickory Plains, and in 1857 came to this portion of the county and settled on the land where Beebe now stands. After a one year's residence at this place he sold out and settled in the vicinity of Stony Point, and here has since made his home. His first purchase of land was 160 acres, and in 1856 he erected the first gin put up in the south part of White County, which he is still operating. Prior to 1883 the machinery was run by horse-power but since that time [p.229] he has used steam. Mr. ainey is a member of the Agricultural Wheel, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Curch, as are the most of their children, Mr. Rainsy and his eldest son being ruling elders in that church. During the war he served in Company D, Tenth Arkansas Regiment, but after May 28, 1862, became a member of Forrest's cavalry and served under him until the close of the war, when his company was disbanded on January 9. He was at Shiloh, Corinth, the gunboat fight on the Big Sandy in Tennessee, Murfressboro, Guntown, Franklin, and was in the various engagements in which Forrest's cavalry participated.

 

John F. Randall, a worthy and conscientious representative of White County, was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., near the city of Cape Girardeau, March 31, 1832. His father, Willam C. Randall, was born in Lexington, Ky., December 15, 1805, and died in Arkansas, February 4, 1863, aged fifty-eight years. He was a regular apprentice to the boot and shoemaker's trade, and an expert in that profession. He was an old line Whig, and manifested great interest in all party campaigns. In 1831 Mr. Randall was united in marriage with Sarah A., daughter of Anthony and Mary Randol, and a native of Missouri. She received her education in her native State, where the greater part of her life was passed, and at the date of her death, in 1854, she was residing in Stoddard County, Mo. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Randall twelve children were born, all of whom grew to maturity. Those living are: John F., Sarah E. (wife of James Samuels, of Missouri), Orlando L. (of Hood County, Tex.), Martha J. (widow of Joseph M. Lean). Those deceased are: William O., Carrol V., Mary Z., Eliza A., Charlotte V., Rebecca L., Edward L. and Harvy C. John F. received but limited advantages for education, as the schools of his boyhood days were very few, but he received a practical knowledge of farming, which occupation he has always followed in connection with stock raising. He owns 320 acres of excellent land, highly cultivated, and everything on his farm indicates thrift and prosperity. He was first married in Calhoun County, Ill., in 1859, to Martha J. Scott of that State, and the result of this marriage was two children, who died in infancy. His second marriage occurred in 1862 to Edna P., daughter of Andrew and Nancy Woodley, of Pike County, Ga., and by her he became the father of three children: William O. and a daughter (dead), and Edward L., now living. He also reared W. R. Randall, a nephew, born June 7, 1860, and Mattie Lee Woodley, a niece, born March 25, 1877. Mr. Randall enlisted in the Union army, July 27, 1862, in Company A, First Arkansas Mounted Rangers. This regiment was reorganized in 1863, at Benton Barracks, Mo., with John E. Phelps as colonel; the regiment afterward being known as the Second Arkansas Cavalry. He acted most of the time as recruiting officer, and in the capacity of scout and escort duty. He participated in the battles of Independence, Jefferson City, Kansas City, Big Blue and many others of minor importance. He received his discharge as first sergeant from said regiment, Company A. For twenty years Mr. Randall has acted as justice of the peace in White County, where he has lived since 1860, and is now filling said office and discharging its manifold duties in a creditable and exemplary manner. He is a Prohibitionist in politics, though not in any way a partisan. He is one of the most prominent members of the Methodist Church, South, and takes an active interest in all the affairs and work of the church, also contributing to all charitable enterprises. He is a member in high standing in the Masonic order.

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James F. Ray, M. D., is a substantial and wellknown practitioner of Arkansas, his first field for the practice of medicine being in Centre Hill in 1883. His early days were spent in Jackson County, where he was born in 1854, and in White County, and when nineteen years of age he commenced the study of medicine. Dr. Ray was the son of Samuel and Jane (Sorrell) Ray. Samuel Ray was born in Alabama in 1824, and was a son of Samuel M. Ray, a native of North Carolina. He moved to Arkansas in 1854, settling in Jackson County, and in 1860 came to White County, where he followed farming. He enlisted in 1862 and [p.230] served in the Confederate service. Mrs. Ray was born in Alabama, in 1828, and was a daughter of James F. and Flora Sorrell, and died in White County in 1869. They were the parents of three children: James F., John and William. Dr. Ray was married in 1877 to Susan E. Barnett, a daughter of Z. H. and Emiline (Stewart) Barnett, natives of Tennessee. To these parents were given seven children, four of whom are still living: Floyd S., Mary E. (deceased), Arthur Curtis (deceased), Mamie A., Samuel H. (deceased), Ethel I. and Blanch W. In 1885 Dr. Ray moved to Mount Pisgah, where he still lives and practices, and is the owner of a forty-acre tract of fine timber land. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. When the Doctor first came to this county, bear, dear and wild turkey were abundant. Politically he is a strong Democrat, and although not taking an active part in politics, has held the office of bailiff of the township; he is a highly respected citizen, and enjoys a large practice extending throughout the adjoining townships.

William P. Reaves, a miller and ginner, of Cadron Township, was born in Alabama, in 1850, and was the second son in a family of eleven children of Emery G. and Elizabeth A. (Davis) Reaves, also of Alabama. Their family consisted of the following children: Emily, William P., Amandy, John T., Narsiscey, Nancy A., Sarah E., George W., Sarah J., Thomas and David. Mrs. Reaves died in 1879, and Mr. Reaves was again married, in 1881, to Susan Foster, and they are residing in Alabama, and have a family of small children. William P. Reaves, the gentleman whose name heads this sketch, was married at the age of seventeen, to Majourie O. Monk, a daughter of Silas and Nancy (Youngblood) Monk. Her father was a Primitive Baptist minister. Mrs. Reaves died in 1885, having been the mother of nine children: Tresser T. (deceased), Tulula, Mary M., William Lee, Ransom L., Caroline (deceased), Georgia (deceased), James (deceased) and Effie (deceased). Mr. Reaves came to Arkansas in 1877, and settled in this township, and in 1882 started a saw-mill and is now sawing and converting the pines of Arkansas into lumber. He was married the second time in 1887 to Anna Drain, the daughter of the Rev. William W. Drain. To this union have been born two children: Isaac E. and Jessie J. Mr. Reaves owns 160 acres of fine timber land, and has twenty acres cleared and under cultivation. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Rock Springs Lodge No. 422, and also a member of the County Wheel. He is a prominent worker in all matters relative to educational and school work, and is one of the esteemed directors of School District No. 28.

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J. F. Redus came with his parents to White County, in 1851, they settling in Marion Township. He was born in Alabama, in 1844, and was the second son in a family of nine children born to Joel S. and Susan J. (Gill) Redus, also f Alabama nativity. The senior Redus had a land warrant for service in the Mexican War, and on which he settled and broke land for a farm, where he lived until he died in 1858, his wife surviving him ten years. The family consisted of the following nine children: W. G. (who resides in this county, and who enlisted in Company B of Thirty-sixth Arkansas Infantry), J. F. (our subject), L. S. (who also served in the Confederate army), L. E. (now Mrs. Simmons, of Cleburne County), John C. (deceased), D. J., Joel S. (deceased), M. G. and T. J. J. F. Redns assisted his father in opening up the farm, and in 1861 enlisted in the Confederate service for twelve months, in Company K, of the Seventh Arkansas Infantry. After the reorganization of the company, he reenlisted for three years, or during the war. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Perrysville (Ky.), Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, and in the ninety-days' fight before Dalton, also at Lookout Mountain, Atlanta and a number of others. He marched barefooted from Franklin, Tenn., to Pulaski, Tenn. Immediately after the cessation of hostilities, he returned home and again took up farming. He now owns a farm of 160 acres, with eighty-five acres under cultivation. He takes an active part in politics, and is a strong Democrat, and was candidate for county treasurer in 1889, but was defeated by combined efforts. [p.231] He and entire family are members of the Baptist Church.

Jackson V. Reynolds, a prominent farmer and fruit grower of White County, was born in Tennessee in 1844, and is a son of Samuel and Margaret (Maderis) Reynolds, natives of Alabama. Mr. Samuel Reynolds was born in 1808, and was married in 1831, after which he moved to Tennessee, and in 1851 came to Arkansas, settling in White County, where he bought a farm of 160 acres, on which he lived until his death, which occurred in 1861. His wife survived him twenty years, and was the mother of nine children, three of whom are living: Jackson V. (our subject), Samuel T. and Marquis L. Jackson V. Reynolds was reared on a farm, educated in this county, and was married, in 1866, to Margaret Thompson, a daughter of James and Martha Thompson of Tennessee origin, and who came to Arkansas at an early day. Mrs. Reynolds died in 1880, leaving five children, four of whom are still living: Edward, Minnie, Mary and Florence. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Reynolds married Mrs. Mitchell (nee McMurtry), a widow, and by this marriage became the mother of three children: Willie, Effie and Van. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army, serving in Capt. Hick's regiment, but was wounded at the battle of Helens, and received his discharge. Mr. Reynolds has a farm of 237 acres, with 140 acres under cultivation, and devotes the most of his attention to fruit growing.

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James P. Rheu, planter, Stevens Creek, Ark. White County, is acknowledged by all to be one of the best agricultural portions of the State, and as such its citizens are men of advanced ideas and considerable prominence. A worthy representative of this class is found in the person of Mr. James P. Rheu. He was originally from Dickson County, Tenn., where his birth occurred on November 23, 1824, and is the son of John and Margaret (Dunnegan) Rheu, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Kentucky, and both of Scotch-Irish descant. The maternal grandparents probably came to Alabama before the Revolutionary War. John Rheu and family moved to Kentucky in about 1830, located in McCracken County, where they remained until about 1840, and then moved to Graves County. There he improved a farm, and made his home until death, which occurred in 1855. The mother died about 1827. James P. Rheu was early initiated into the duties of farm life, and received a liberal education for those days. In 1857 he came to Arkansas, located at Denmark, Jackson County, and engaged in merchandising, which he continued successfully for many years. On May 15, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Martha V. Edens, a native of Fayette County and the daughter of H. and Ann (Price) Edens, natives of Lincoln County, Tenn., and probably of Irish descent. The maternal great grandfather of Mrs. Rheu was connected with the commissary department of the Colonial army, and her grandfather Price, was a soldier under Gen. Jackson, in the War of 1812, participating in the battle of New Orleans, also in the subsequent Indian Wars. To Mr. and Mrs. Rheu were born four children: Ider E. (born June 11, 1860), Lelia C. (born October 8, 1865), William F. (born February 8, 1875), and Maggie A. (born February 22, 1876). Ider E. married J. C. Meadows on November 30, 1879, and is the mother of four children: Claude L., Ollie V., Lillian M. and Homer C. Mr. Meadows is a farmer by occupation. Mr. Rhen's other children are at home. In the fall of 1862, Mr. Rheu had become nicely fixed in business, had erected a fine dwelling-house, also a store, and excellent outbuildings upon his place; was also speculating in cotton, and had about ten bales on hand, when his buildings were set on fire, and his store, his entire stock of goods and his cotton were destroyed. After this severe loss he rented land, followed farming near Denmark, and there remained until 1866, when he bought a farm in Jackson County. This tract contained eighty acres of improved land, and there he resided until 1871, when he moved to his present property, arriving there on December 20 of that year. He purchased one hundred acres, with about fifteen under cultivation, and erected their present house the same year. At present he has about thirty acres under cultivation. He is a member of Anchor Lodge No. 49, A. F. and A. M., and has [p.232] served the lodge in the capacity of Senior Warden and Junior Warden, and has also been secretary for seven years of Fredonia Lodge No. 229. He holds a demit from Tillman Chapter No. 19, R. A. M., Searcy, Ark. In his political views he affiliates with the Democratic party. Mrs. Rheu, and her daughter Lelia, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mrs. Ider E. Meadows is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

 

Mrs. Mary M. Rhoden is the daughter of Jacob Free Coffman (deceased), who, from an early period in the country's history, gave to Independence County (to which he came in 1851, locating on the White River) the best energies of his life as one of the most worthy and respected citizens, and to the community and all among whom he lived, the example of a life well and usefully spent, and the influence of a character without stain. In this county he bought a farm of 400 acres, on which he lived till his death in 1858. His birth occurred February 10, 1805, and he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Young on March 17, 1826, in Lauderdale County, Tenn. He was the son of Lovell and Sallie (Greene) Coffman, the former a native of Virginia, of German descent, and whose ancestors came to America previous to the Colonial War. Sallie (Greene) Coffman was a relative of Gen. Greene of Revolutionary fame. Mrs. Catherine (Young) Coffman was the daughter of Samuel and Keziah (Hogue) Young. Samuel Young was a native of South Carolina, was of English descent, and his grandfather came to America about 1740 and located in South Carolina where Samuel was born. Keziah (Hogue) Young was a native of South Carolina, her parents being of English descent. The maternal grandfather (Doolittle) was killed by Tories in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. Jacob Free and Catherine (Young) Coffman were the parents of these children: Sarah Ann K., Samuel Lovell, Mary Margaret, John Tillmore, Daniel A., Martha Jane, Elizabeth C., Amy Evaline, Susan Rebecca and Laura Malinda. Mary M. Coffman was the third daughter of the above-mentioned family, her birth occurring on January 25, 1832, in Franklin County, Ala., and she received a good English education in the subscription schools of her native county. There she grew to womanhood and was united in marriage to John Harrison Rhoden, a native of Alabama, on November 11, 1847, in Lawrence County. To this union were born eight children: Archie C. (born August 2, 1848), Frances Catherine (born November 3, 1849), Martha Jane (born September 6, 1851, and died in December of the same year), Rebecca Walker (born November 2, 1854, and died on September 5, 1858), Sarah E. (born January 25, 1856), Laura Sophronia (born September 6, 1858), John Breckenridge (born October 15, 1860) and Lucy Coleman (born December 20, 1862). All the children were born in Arkansas, with the exception of Archie, whose birth occurred in Alabama. Archie C. married Miss Matilda J. Means, a native of Virginia, and Frances C. married J. W. Moseley, a native of Kentucky, who is now residing in White County; Sarah E. married Lawrence West-moreland, a native of Georgia, who is now deceased, Sophronia married William Woodall, a native of Arkansas, John B. resides in Texas, Lucy C. married Dr. Joseph H. Fillinger, a native of Virginia, and now residing in White County. The settlement of the Rhoden family in Arkansas was made in 1849 when the country was an unbroken wilderness. Mrs. Rhoden is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, having united with that denomination in 1849. The family purchased 160 acres when they first settled in this State, and Mrs. Rhoden now owns 120 acres of that farm.

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Dr. Willshire Riley is engaged in the drug business at Judsonia, Ark., and has been established there since 1880. He was born in Auglaize County. Ohio, in 1828, and in 1866 settled in White County, and after residing in Searcy one year, he moved to Red River Township, and for some years was engaged in shipping corn at Riley's Landing. He was educated in the schools of Ohio, and in 1849 was married in Mercer County, of that State, to Miss Ruth Lindsey, removing in 1854 to Toledo, where he acted as deputy collector of customs. He also published the Toledo Daily, but in 1856 went to Perry County, [p.233] Ill., and began practicing medicine, having previously taken a course in the Cincinnati Medical College, graduating in the class of 1856. He remained in Perry County until 1866, then came to Searcy, and has been in business here since that time. He took an active part in politics during reconstruction days, and in 1870 and 1871 was senator, representing White and Pulaski Counties. He has been interested in the cause of education, and has aided all enterprises which were for the good of the community. He is a Douglas Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Of five children born to them, three are living: Horatio (who is married, and resides in Pine Bluff), Kate (Mrs. Hines, resides in Van Buren County) and Willshire (a druggist of Pine Bluff). Dr. Riley is a member of Lodge No. 384 of the A. F. & A. M., and belongs to Tillman Chapter No. 19, and Searcy Council. He is one of the family of six born to James W. and Susan (Ellis) Riley, the former a native of Connecticut, and the latter of New York, and their union took place in Ohio. Mr. Biley was a Government surveyor, and did the most of the surveying of Northwest Ohio and Indiana, but was also a lawyer by profession. He died in January, 1876, and is still survived by his wife, who is a resident of Denver, Colo. The paternal grandfather, Capt. James Riley, was born in Middletown, Conn., and was the author of Riley's Narrative. Being appointed by President Jackson to survey the Northwestern Territory, he came to Ohio in 1819, and laid out the town of Willshire. Being a sea captain he returned to his calling, and died on the ocean while on one of his voyages in 1840.

Elbert A. Robbins, the eldest son of D. and Olivia (Shinpouch) Robbins, natives of Alabama and Mississippi, respectively, dates his existence from December 23, 1857. His father became a resident of Arkansas in 1856, settling in White County, on a farm of 160 acres of land, ten miles south of Rose Bud, where he died in 1865, shortly after returning from the war. His wife, survived him nine years, leaving a family of five children: Elbert A. (the subject of this sketch), J. W. [reference to whom follows], C. D., Molly and Samuel. E. A. Robbins started out in the world for himself at the age of fifteen without means or influence. He worked on a farm for three years, with but little success, after which his time was pent in a saw-mill until in April, 1881, when he bought a saw-mill, selling it, however, in October of the same year. In 1882 he farmed, but commenced the mercantile business at Rose Bud, in January, 1883, in partnership with his brother, J. W. Robbins. This he has followed ever since, with encouraging results. Besides his only brother he has one sister, Mollie Holmes, still living. Mr. Robbins professed religion, and joined the Baptist Church in 1887. He was married, in 1878, to Miss Ida Crooms, and to them have been born six children, three of whom are living: Emma, Walter and Mandie; those deceased are Mollie, Elmer and an infant. Mrs. Robbins is also a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He takes an active part in the Sunday-schools, and exerts his whole influence for the promotion of religious and educational institutions.

J. W. Robbins, a brother of E. A. Robbins, commenced in life on his own account at the age of fourteen, in 1883 entering into the mercantile business in White County. He was born in this county in 1860, his parents being D. and Olivia (Shinpouch) Robbins [reference to whom appears in the sketch which precedes this]. J. W. Robbins was married, in 1886, to Susan I. Thomas, a daughter of W. A. and Jane (Post) Thomas. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins are the parents of two children: Oscar (living) and Laura A. (deceased). Mr. Robbins is a strong Democrat, and takes an active interest in all work for the interest of schools or general public good.

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John A. Roberson. Among the farmers and stockmen of White County, Ark., none are more prominent than our subject, who, though he is a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., born November 19, 1835, has been a resident of White County since 1870. He was reared to a farm life and his knowledge of the "Three R's" was acquired in the common schools. He was thrown on the world to fight his own way through life at the early age [p.234] of sixteen years on account of the death of his father, and until his marriage on November 17, 1854, he worked as a farm hand. His wife, Angeline Redmon, was a native of Haywood County and bore Mr. Roberson eight children as follows: George (who died in infancy), a child who died unnamed, William (who is a farmer of White County), James (also a farmer), Anna (wife of Elijah Cupp, died leaving one child), Lela (is the wife of William P. Brickell, a farmer of Phillips County, Ark.), Thomas (farms in Texas) and Edgar (who was born on June 20, 1873). Mr. Roberson departed this life on July 27, 1888, an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Mary (Coleman) Murphy, a native of Alabama and a resident of Arkansas for about nineteen years, became his wife February 24, 1889. After his first marriage Mr. Roberson farmed and acted as overseer until 1864 when he went into the army and served until the cessation of hostilities. He then became manager of a large farm owned by a wealthy planter of Haywood County, but since 1870 has resided in White County, he being now the owner of 320 acres of land. At the time of his purchase there were sixty-five acres under cultivation, but he now has 110 acres under the plow and has added 130 acres to his original purchase. His land is well adapted to raising all necessary farm products, and for several years past he has devoted much of his time to stock raising. He has been an active worker for the cause of Christianity for many years and socially is a member of Beebe Lodge No. 145 of the A. F. & A. M. His parents, Jesse and Mary A. (Vaughn) Roberson, were born in Virginia and South Carolina in 1815 and 1810, respectively, and were married about 1834. They died in Tennessee, the former in Haywood County in 1851, and the latter in Davidson County, in 1848. Three of their eight children died in infancy: William (lived to be grown and lost his life in the battle in June, 1863, and was buried in a soldier's cemetery), Mary (is the wife of James Tatum, of Bell Station, Tenn.). Fidelis (is the wife of James Collins, an Englishman, residingin Tennessee), Eliza (is the wife of Robert Pitner, a farmer of Tennessee), and John A. (our subject).

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A. T. Rodmon has ably served his county as commissioner four years, as school director six years, and also as president of the board of registration. His parents, James and Jennie (Kell) Rodmon, were natives of South Carolina, his paternal and maternal grandfathers being of Irish origin, who came to this country at the same time and settled in South Carolina. Grandfather Rodmon had a family of four children: John, Thomas, Sarah and James. James Rodmon was married in 1828 or 1829, and had a family of five children: A. T. (our subject), Mary A. (who married a man by the name of Blunt), Susan (Ballard), John C. and James C. Mr. Rodmon died on July 13, 1849, in South Carolina, to which State his family moved from South Carolina that year. A. T. Rodmon was married, after attaining manhood, in 1856 in Mississippi, to Miss Mary Williams, a daughter of P. W. and Nancy (McDowell) Williams, and of North Carolina birth. After this event Mr. Rodmon Settled on a farm and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits for four years, then moving to White County, Ark., in 1859, and locating on a farm twelve miles south of Searcy. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army and served on detached duty during the war. In 1873 he removed to Kane Township, where he now resides, enjoying at this time a wide and honored acquaintance. Mr. and Mrs. Rodmon have had twelve children, four of whom only are living: Alice M., Nora E., Frank and Clinton J. These are at home and attending school. In 1868 Mr. Rodmon was appointed justice of the peace, and the same year elected county commissioner, which position he held four years. In 1872 he was elected president of the board of registration, and is now school director, having discharged the official duties connected therewith for six years. He is a member of the Masonic order, and has been connected with the I. O. O. F. Himself and wife have been members of the Baptist Church for the past thirty-two years, Mr. Rodmon having held the position of church clerk for seventeen years. He has also acted as president of the County Wheel for six years, besides holding the office of district deputy for two years. Mr. Rodmon is a strong [p.235] Republican and has taken an active interest in the polities of his county. A highly respected citizen, he worthily deserves the universal esteem bestowed upon himself and family.

Benjamin Rogers, in his active career through life, has amassed considerable wealth, and is now owner of a fine farm, comprising 400 acres, 120 of which he has put under cultivation, clearing ninety acres himself. He has around him every convenience, and his buildings, fences and orchards have been placed on his property by his own hands. From his earliest remembrance he has been familiar with farm life, but his youthful advantages for acquiring an education were very limited. He came with his father to Arkansas, and made his home with him until twenty-six years old, having married, at the age of

twenty-four, Miss Anna E. Bailey, a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of J. J. Bailey, a pioneer settler of White County. Mrs. Rogers died in September, 1862, and on January 15, 1865, he married Miss Hannah J. Jackson, a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of H. Jackson, a blacksmith by trade. Eleven children have been born to them, of whom ten are living: Marion F. (born February 24, 1866, and lives on his father's farm), J. M. (who was born October 13, 1868), William H. (born August 27, 1869), Robert E. (born June 23, 1871), Mary E. (born August 6, 1873, and died September 2, 1887), Minnie B. (born January 30, 1875), Bettie H. (born November 13, 1878), Benjamin D. (born February 9, 1880). Calvin J. (born January 27, 1883), Ava L. (born January 27, 1885), and Arthur L. (born April 25, 1887). Mrs. Rogers, the mother of this large family, departed this life February 7, 1889, having been a life-long member of the Missionary Baptist Church, a faithful wife and mother, and her death is not only mourned by her immediate family, but by all with whom she came in contact. In 1861 Mr. Rogers bought 160 acres of the farm where he now lives, going in debt for the same, and notwithstanding the fact that the war came up and scattered his property, he has succeeded admirably. In June, 1862, he joined Company A, Thirty-sixth Arkansas Regiment, and was in the battles of Prairie Grove, Helena, Little Rock, besides numerous skirmishes. He was not wounded nor taken prisoner during his term of service, and was a faithful soldier to the cause he espoused. Upon his return home he found himself robbed of all his property, except the land for which he was considerably in debt, but he began devoting his entire attention to his farm, and has succeeded in putting himself and family beyond the reach of want. He is a Democrat, a member of Beebe Lodge No. 145 of the A. F. & A. M., and for the past seventeen years has been one of the most faithful members of the latter organization. He is public-spirited, and keeps thoroughly apace with the times on all matters of public interest. He was born in Haywood County, Tenn., on August 1, 1836, and is a son of William and Sarah E. (Powers) Rogers, the former born in North Carolina in 1809, and the latter in 1811. They were married in Tennessee about 1830, and in 1854 came to White County, Ark., and settled on what is well known as the Williams' farm, near where Beebe now stands. Mr. Rogers bought 400 acres of woodland, and until he could build him a log-house his family lived in a tent. Like the majority of the pioneer settlers of early times

"He cut, he logged, he cleared his lot, And into many a dismal spot He let the light of day." During his lifetime he cleared over 100 acres of land, and at the time of his death (in 1871) he was one of the wealthy men of the county. In politics he was an old line Whig. His wife died in 1838, and in 1842 he married again, having by this union five children, only two now living, Rufus H. and Robert E., both farmers. His first marriage also resulted in the birth of five children, Benjamin and Elizabeth (wife of Oliver Greene) being the only ones alive.

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Thomas J. Rogers, another of the prominent pioneer settlers of White County, has been located here for a period of overforty years, and has not only become well known, but the respect and honor shown him is as wide as his acquaintance. He came to White County in 1848, settled with a brother, Robert J., within three miles of Searcy, which at that time contained two small supply stores, one made of log and the other of plank, [p.236] and a blacksmith shop. Mr. Rogers was born in Chatham County, N. C., in 1826, was the sixth in a family of ten children (all dead but two), born to Absalom and Hannah (Johnson) Rogers, natives of North Carolina. The parents immigrated to Tennessee at an early day and there the father carried on agricultural pursuits. He was one of the jury that convicted J. A. Merrill. His death occurred in Tennessee, in 1840, and his wife died in North Carolina. Grandfather Rodgers is buried in North Carolina, of which State the family were pioneers. Brought up as an agriculturist it would have been quite natural had Thomas J. Rogers followed in the footsteps of his father, but his tendencies inclined elsewhere, and after securing a fair education in the subscription schools of Tennessee and Arkansas, and farming one year, in 1849 he came to Searcy, where he clerked for Bond & Maxwell, general merchants. He remained with this firm until 1851, and went into partnership in a separate house with the firm, taking the management. In 1852 Mr. Rogers purchased the full control and continued in business until 1862, when he had everything taken from him, it all becoming common property. During the war he raised a company and followed guerrillas, but later he moved to Urbana, Ill., purchased property and remained until the close of the war. The people were anxious to know what he was going to do, so in 1865, he returned to Searcy, Ark., but before coming back liquidated his debts at 25 and 50 per cent with Philadelphia houses. He paid it and received their receipts in full, and later paid it in full with interest, in 1867. After this Mr. Rogers engaged in the real-estate business, in which he is now interested, and is the owner of 20,000 acres in White and Cleburne Counties. He has twenty improved farms in these counties, is renting out land and owns a fine body of timber situated on White and Red Bayou, Des Arc. Politically, Mr. Rogers is the father of the Prohibition party in this county and bought the Lever by the thousands, distributing them gratuitously through the country. He fought for the Local Option bill, was successful, and all rejoiced. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Searcy Lodge No. 49, and was charter member of the same. He was married in White County, Ark., in 1859, to Miss Susie M. Lewis, a native of Mississippi, and to this union were born seven children, five now living: Thomas B., Hallie B., Angie (now Mrs. Jones, of Memphis, Tenn.), Susie M. and Naomi. The mother of these children closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1877. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which Mr. Rogers also belongs, having joined in 1840; he has been a scholar and teacher ever since. In 1852 Mr. Rogers joined the Sons of Temperance, but now considers that their work was largely in vain. In 1880 he was sent to Cleveland, Ohio, to the Prohibition National Convention, became a member of that party, and has been on the executive board ever since; was sent to the National Prohibition Convention, which met at Indianapolis, Ind., in 1888, and assisted in forming the Prohibition platform, every plank of which exactly suited him. The same year he was also delegate to the Arkansas State Convention at Little Rock, which adopted the national party platform.

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Hon. John P. H. Russ is a man who needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for he has been usefully and honorably identified with the interests of this county and with its advancement in every worthy particular for many years. His early paternal ancestors were of Scotch Irish descent and were among the original settlers of Jamestown, Va., but the two immigrants, Vincent and John, spelled their name Rusk, although the old Scotch way of spelling the name was Russ, a fact which was discovered by Charles E. Russ, the father of our biographical subject, while reading Scotch history, during his attendance at Hillsboro (N. C.) College. He adopted the old way of spelling the name, and as such it has continued to the present time. Charles E. Russ and his brother, John P. H., afterward graduated from Raleigh College, Raleigh, N. C., and the latter subsequently became a prominent politician, and was honored with the office of Secretary of his native State, a position he held several terms, serving in the interests of the Democratic party. Charles E. Russ was strongly opposed to secession, and stumped the "Old North State" and Georgia in [p.237] opposition to that measure. His wife, Sarah A. Parker, was a daughter of Harrison and Sarah (Parrish) Parker, the former of Scotch-Irish descent and the latter of French. Hon. John P. H. Russ was born in Floyd County, Ga., April 27, 1852, and in 1859 he was taken by his parents to Charlotte, S. C. After a residence of a few months in Florida they settled in Marengo County, Ala., remaining there until 1866, when Denmark, Tenn., became their home. Their first settlement in Arkansas was in the year 1869, when they settled at El Paso, in White County, purchasing a farm of 160 acres, twenty acres of which was heavily covered with timber. Here both father and mother died, in 1884, the former in January and the latter in June. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Russ was a Mason, his wife belonging to the Eastern Star Lodge. Their family consisted of four sons and two daughters, two of whom are living besides our subject: James E. (who was married to Miss Belle Andrews, a native of Kentucky, is an attorney at law of Beebe, Ark.) and Laura J. (the wife of Thomas Midyett, a resident of El Paso Township). This couple was married in Tennessee and came to Arkansas in 1870, and are here rearing their family of three sons: Henry, Charley and Bascom. Hon. John P. H. Russ first commenced attending school in Red Mountain, Ala., but was afterward a student in the common schools of Tennessee, and finished his education in the Methodist graded school under the supervision of Prof. J. W. Thompson. June 23, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss Narcie L. Booth, a daughter of M. L. and Elizabeth (Bushel) Booth [a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work], and their union resulted in the birth of the following family: Mary E. (born May 18, 1873, and died September 4, 1885), Samira M. (born March 14, 1875), Charles L. (born March 23, 1877), Lena Mora (born December 4, 1880, and died March 4, 1889), Walter M. (born February 9, 1882), Otey S. (born February 28, 1884), John T. (born April 2, 1886), and Laura B. (born January 21, 1888). Mr. Russ always voted with the Democrat party until 1883 and, as he says, did more for the party than his Satanic Majesty, the Devil, ever did, but he left it in consequence of dissatisfaction with the corruption of both the Democrat and Republican parties and identified himself with the Labor movement; and at a meeting of the White County Wheel, May 7, 1884, he was elected a delegate to the State Wheel, which was held at Little Rock, on June 9, of the same year. At this meeting a full county ticket was organized and Mr. Russ, the delegate, was told to use his own judgment as to which to support–a Labor State or a Wheel ticket. The result was the nomination of the Labor State ticket, and Mr. Russ was chosen by the committee as chairman of the committee for drawing up a platform, and wrote the first four planks. He was afterward elected chairman of the State and Labor Central Committee, and when a meeting was called at Litchfield, Jackson County, on July 27, 1884, he again filled out the ticket, and Charles E. Cunning was the nominee for Governor and received 19,706 votes in twenty-three counties organized in the State, out of seventy-five. At this meeting the delegates met under the shade of a tree and nominated a ticket for Congress, their nominee, R. B. Carl Lee, receiving a small vote in the district. At a meeting of the State Wheel at Little Rock, in 1884, Mr. Russ was elected as a delegate to the Labor Convention at Cincinnati, Ohio, the meeting to be held February 2, 1885. At the meeting of the Union Labor party in White County he was chosen permanent chairman, and was a delegate to the State convention with instructions to put in the field a full State ticket, using his judgment in favor of the best man. He did so, and a vigorous canvass was carried on, the result being the election of Hon. C. M. Norwood, an ex-Confederate, one-leg soldier, as Governor, by a majority of from 8,000 to 10,000 votes. In 1886, at a meeting of the State Wheel, he was elected a member of the executive committee of that body, and was re-elected for three consecutive terms. He was also a delegate to the National Agricultural Wheel, the meeting of all Labor organizations, at Meridian, Miss., in December, 1888; was a member of the first National Cotton Committee, also at that place, and the second one, held at Atlanta, Ga. In 1886 he represented the Arkansas [p.238] State Wheel, at Raleigh, N. C., and was elected by that body to the Farmers' Union to be held at Shreveport, La., in 1887. At a meeting of the State Wheel held at Little Rock, the same year, he was chosen State Lecturer, and was reelected in 1888. The following year, at a meeting of the State Wheel at Hot Springs, he was chosen president of the State Wheel of Arkansas, and was at the same time elected a delegate to the National Farmers' and Laborers' Union, which was held in St. Louis, in December, 1889. October 19, of the same year, as president of the above-named body he issued a proclamation dissolving the State Wheel, and adopting the Farmers' and Laborers' Union of America, as agreed at the meeting of all the Labor organizations in 1888. Mr. Russ was president of the first district Wheel ever organized in White County, and filled the same position for the Twenty-seventh, the first senatorial Wheel, comprising White and Faulkner Counties. He discharged the duties of this position also for the Second Congressional Wheel, to which office he was elected in 1884, and he has been re-elected each succeeding year. He has held the office of Lecturer in the subordinate office for five years, and in this capacity has lectured in a great many counties. He is a strict temperance man, and for many years has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and in support of the latter, as well as in the cause of education, he has been exceedingly liberal and free-hearted. He is now acting as deputy sheriff of White County, and although repeatedly urged to run for representative of White County, he has declined, thinking he could do more good for his party off the ticket than on. In 1873 Mr. Russ purchased from the United States Government 160 acres of wild land, and by subsequent purchases has increased his land to 660 acres, of which 122 are under cultivation. His first farm was heavy timber land, but after many years of arduous labor and with the assistance of his worthy wife, who has proved to him a true helpmate, he has become one of the wealthy agriculturists of the county. In the comparatively short time which has elapsed since he commenced doing for himself, he has developed and improved two fine farms, and has made all the property he now has by the sweat of his brow as, at the time of marriage, he only possessed $23, a horse and a gold watch. At the time of locating, he, his wife and father could carry their effects on their backs, and the furniture with which their house was provided was made of lumber from their own land. Many changes have occurred since this esteemed citizen first located here, and he has witnessed the growth, of what was once a vast wilderness, to one of the most prosperous and influential counties of the State. He and wife have hosts of warm friends, and as they look back over their past careers they can see little to regret, while the future in the life to come stands out brightly before them.

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James E. Russ, an attorney at law and notary public, of Beebe, is recognized as a prominent member of the legal fraternity of White County. A native of North Carolina, he was born in Orange County, November 9, 1855, being the son of Charles E. and Sarah A. (Parker) Russ, also of North Carolina origin [a sketch of whose lives appears on a previous page, as well as a history of this illustrious family]. Charles Russ was born in 1819 and his wife in 1826. They were of Scotch-Irish and English descent, and were married in their native State in 1843, moving in 1859 to Alabama, where Mr. Russ conducted an extensive plantation, and managed a large force of slaves until after the war (in which he held the rank of major for four years). He subsequently went to Tennessee and after a residence there of four years, moved again, this time settling in El Paso, Ark., where he followed the occupation of farming until his death in 1885. He was a Universalist in his religious belief, his wife, who only survived him a few months, being a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Russ was a member of high standing in the Masonic order, and Mrs. Russ of the Eastern Star. James E. was the fifth in a family of six children, as follows: Laura J. (wife of Thomas H. Midyett, a wealthy farmer of El Paso), J. P. H. Russ (farmer and president of the State Wheel of Arkansas), Charles W. (who died at the age of twenty-two, unmarried), Mary and Robert (who both died in their youth). James [p.239] E. was reared to farm life, but his opportunities for obtaining an education were very limited, three months being the extent of his entire schooling. At an early age, however, he became a careful student and constant reader at home. When twenty-one he entered upon the reading of law, at the same time managing the farm and supporting his parents. This course he continued until 1883, when he was admitted to the bar at Little Rock, having passed a critical examination before Judges W. F. Hill, T. J. Oliphant and J. M. Rose, committee, with Judge F. T. Vaughn as presiding judge. After passing this examination Mr. Russ formed a partnership with Judge Oliphant, under the firm name of Oliphant & Russ, which relation existed nearly two years. Compelled to withdraw at that time on account of ill health, he passed several months in traveling, later returning to Arkansas, and finally settled in Beebe, where he has since resided, gaining by his upright course and recognized ability, the confidence and esteem of all acquaintances. As a practictioner he has built up an enviable and lucrative clientage, having a general law business in all courts of the State. In January, 1887, he lost his residence and contents by fire, but by energy, economy and strict integrity, has recovered from that disaster almost entirely. In December, 1883, Mr. Russ was united in marriage with Miss Belle Andrews, an estimable lady, daughter of William Andrews, a lawyer of Paducah, Ky. To them have been given a family of two children: Paul Eaton (born in September, 1884) and Jane (born November 2, 1886). Mr. and Mrs. Russ are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and both are deservedly popular in society circles. The former votes the sraight Democratic ticket, but has never been looked upon as an aspirant for political preferment. During the year 1888 he was a member of the real-estate firm of Merrill, Russ & Co.

Christopher N. Saunders, a farmer and stockman of Dog Wood Township, White County, Ark., was born in Virginia in 1822, and is the second child born to Wren and Mary D. (Teatroff) Saunders, who were also Virginians, the father's birth occurring in 1822. His parents, Reuben and Frances Saunders, were born in that State, and there reared their family, of which State their son Wren is still an inhabitant. He was married in 1840, his wife being a daughter of John Teatroff, and he and wife reared a family of eleven children: Columbia I., Christopher N., Jane (who was a Mrs. Hunt, and is now dead), Reuben, Daniel (who died young), Mary (also died in childhood), Ellen and Logan (both died in infancy), Millard P. (a resident of West Virginia), Artemes and Leanna D. (married). The mother of these children died in 1865, a consistent member of the Christian Church at the time of her death. Christopher N. Saunders spent his youth on a frm, and also received his early schooling in his native State. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fifth Virginia Cavalry, and the first battle in which he participated was near Richmond. After the war he began farming for himself, and in 1871 was married to Malina Owen, a daughter of William and Keron Owen, natives of Virginia, both of whom are now dead. Mr. Saunders and his wife reared a family of six children: Wren, Minnie, Claudius, Keron, Clifford G. and Charles C. John W. died in childhood, and Mattie Lee died in October, 1889. In 1876 our subject removed with his family to White County, Ark., and in 1881 bought his present farm of 160 acres. He has forty acres under cultivation, and is doing well. He is a Democrat, and he and wife belong to the Christian Church.

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Elihu Q. Seaton is the son of George W. Seaton, a native of Alabama, who was born near Huntsville, Madison County, N. Ala., on June 13, 1820, moving when quite young with his parents to Panola County, Miss., where he grew to manhood. In 1841 he was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda Smart, also of Alabama origin, her birth occurring in Florence, Lauderdale County, April 9, 1820. When a young girl she accompanied her parents to Mississippi. George W. Seaton was by profession a farmer, but spent a greater part of his time in teaching school, being a man of superior education and refinement. He was an exemplary member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and took an active part in all church and charitable [p.240] enterprises, particularly so in his later years. In his political views he sided with the Democrats, and held many offices of trust, discharging his duties in a highly commendable manner, and winning great credit for himself and family. He was a Mason in high standing, and recognized as a prominent and influential citizen. Mrs. Seaton, though a professor of religious faith from a very early age, was not connected with any church. She and her husband were descendants of some of the oldest and best families of Northern Alabama. Removing from Mississippi to Lonoke County, Ark., in 1878, they were residing there at the time of Mr. Seaton's death in September, 1880. Mrs. Seaton then went to Texas, but soon returned to her home in Lonoke County, where she now lives. To their union nine children were born, seven of whom survive: William (a farmer of Panola, Miss.), George S. N. (a planter of Sevier County, Ark.), Sarah S. T. (the wife of J. M. Smith, of Faulkner County, Ark.), Elihu Q. (the subject of this sketch), Albertine, J. (now Mrs. J. D. McPherson, of Collins County, Tex.), Lucy A. (wife of Elias Harrell, of Prairie County, Ark.), Georgiana A. (Mrs. Frank White, a prosperous farmer of Lonoke County, Ark.), Frances H. (widow of William Mason; now the wife of Andrew Lowe), B. A. (the wife of L. J. Pardue, and died in Lonoke County in 1887). Elihu Q. Seaton's educational advantages in youth were limited to the inferior schools of the period, but by constant reading and close observation, he has obtained a good practical education. He began for himself at the age of twenty years, first as a farmer, and then as a teacher in the public schools, where for eight years he instructed the young idea, and gained an enviable local reputation as an instructor, For the last three years Mr. Seaton has been engaged in the mercantile business, and is now located at Russell, Ark. He carries a general stock valued at $2,000, and has been quite successful in this business, and in the accumulation of property. He was married January 13, 1880, to Miss Frances A. Gamble, of White County, and a Kentuckian by birth. To this marriage one child has been born, Benjamin A., on October 11, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Seaton are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, to which they give their support. In all worthy enterprises Mr. Seaton is a leader, not a follower, and has accomplished, by his progressive spirit, many things that might otherwise still be in an embryo state. He is a conservative Democrat, and a member in high standing of the Masonic order. In 1888 he received an appointment as notary public for a term of four years.

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Andrew C. Shoffner, M. D., deserves honorable mention as one of the successful practitioners of the healing art in White County, and since 1876 has been actively engaged in alleviating the sufferings of the sick and afflicted, his services being in demand among the best people of the county. He was born in Tennessee, in 1830, and is a son of Martin and Jane C. (Johnson) Shoffner, and grandson of John and Christenia Shoffner. Martin Shoffner was born in North Carolina, in 1806, and inherited German blood from his parents. He was married in 1828, and the children born to his union are as follows: Andrew C., Mary A. (Mrs. Johnson, living in Tennessee), Minerva A. (Mrs. Powell, now deceased), James H. (a resident of Mississippi), Elizabeth J. (Mrs. Howard, living in Mississippi), Susan A. (Mrs. Vick, also a resident of Mississippi), John F. (who was killed in the battle of Chickamauga), Josephine (Mrs. Curl, of Mississippi) and Francis M. (living in De Soto County, Miss.). Martin Shoffner followed the occupation of farming all his life, and spent his declining years in Marshall County, Miss., his death occurring there in 1858, his wife's death having occurred in 1851, both being members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Dr. Shoffner, our subject, spent his youth on a farm in Tennessee, and completed his education at a private school. In 1862 he enlisted in the army, but was shortly after discharged on account of ill health and returned home. He was married in 1851 to Miss Julia A. Vick, a daughter of Ransom and Elizabeth Vick, the former of Virginia, and the latter a Tennesseean. Of a family of thirteen children born to the Doctor and his wife, only one is dead. Those living are: Robert L. (who married Sallie A. Walker, and resides in the county), Cordelia (Mrs. [p.241] Smith, a resident of Marshall County, Miss.), Jennie (Mrs. Walker, is a resident of Dog Wood Township), Ella (Mrs. Davis, lives in Argenta, Ark.), James M. (lives at Searcy), Laura (Mrs. Beaver, is a resident of Arkansas), Augustus F., Lucy E., Henrietta, Idonia and Addie, all single. In 1866 Dr. Shoffner came to White County, Ark., settling in Searcy Valley, but since 1874 has been a resident of Dog Wood Township, where he has a farm of 100 acres, with fifty under cultivation. He devotes his time to the practice of his profession, and leaves his sons to manage the farm. He is ever interested in all good works, and gives liberally of his means in the support of schools and churches. Politically he is a Republican, and socially, belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

Thomas Smith. Personal popularity results largely from the industry, perseverance and close attention to business which a person displays in the management of any particular branch of trade, and in the case of Mr. Smith this is most certainly true, for he has adhered closely to farming and the stock industry, and helped in so many ways to advance all worthy interests in the community, that he has won the admiration and respect of all. His parents, Matthew and Mary (McCue) Smith were born in Killeshandra Village, Ireland, and to them were given three sons: Peter (born in 1821), Thomas (born in 1822), and James (born in 1824). The father died in 1824, and his widow resided in her native county until 1831, when she with her family moved to the city of Balbriggean, County Dublin, and there lived until her demise in 1840. Seven years later Thomas Smith and his brother James emigrated to America, the elder brother, Peter, having emigrated to this country in 1845. They landed at New York, May 27, 1847, and after a few days' stay in that city they joined their brother Peter in Delaware County, Penn., he having secured work with a farmer, S. T. Walker. They were also fortunate enough to find employment, and from the time they reached Pennsylvania until three and one-half years later Thomas was engaged in farm labor. In 1850 ha, with his brother James, removed to Arkansas and settled in Faulkner County (then Conway County), each becoming the owner of 160 acres of land, both of which are in the possession of our subject at the present time. In 1850 he was married in the Catholic Church of Old Chester, Penn., to Miss Mary Ann Collins, a native of County Donegal, Ireland, and after their removal to Arkansas they both set energetically to work to clear and improve their farm, which was a heavy timber tract inhabited by all kinds of wild game. Their capital consisted of a pair of willing hands and a determination to succeed no matter what the obstacles might be, and to say that they had been successful would not do the subject justice. The year following their arrival in the State they built them a substantial log-house, and the first letter they received after settling in their new home, was from a friend in Pennsylvania, Mr. Smith walking to the nearest postoffice, a distance of twenty miles to receive it. He has cleared 150 acres of his farm from timber, and now has some of the most fertile land of which the county can boast. Having experienced the many hardships and privations which beset a man in his journey through life, Mr. Smith never turns the more unfortunate from his door, but is always generous, charitable and hospitable. The following family was born to him and his first wife: James (born August 19, 1851), Mary Ann (born in 1853). Sarah (born in 1855), Susan (born in 1856), Thomas (born in 1857) and Edward (born in 1859), all of whom died in infancy, the mother also dying August 1, 1859. In 1861 Mr. Smith espoused his second wife, Miss Elizabeth Hogans, of Arkansas, but her death occurred in 1870, in giving birth to her son, Henry. The children of this union are: William (born January 20, 1862), Alice (born May 9, 1864), Thomas (born October 24, 1865), Hugh (born April 17, 1867), Edward (born April 27, 1867), Robert (born December 9, 1869) and Henry (born January 27, 1870). On January 18, 1871, Mr. Smith's union with his third wife took place, her name being Elizabeth Wilson. Mr. Smith and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and all their children have been baptized in that faith, but were never confirmed. Mr. Smith is a Democrat, and a member of the Agricultural Wheel No. 99.

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Joel W. Smith, a prominent farmer of White [p.242] County, is a son of Alexander and Sarah (Follwell) Smith, natives of Virginia. Alexander Smith was married in 1816 or 1817, and had a family of five children: Catharine, William H., James M., Sarah A. and Joel W., our subject. Mrs. Smith died in 1828, in Alabama. Mr. Smith then married his second wife in 1830, her maiden name being Miss Margaret Ellis. They were the parents of nine children: Aaron G. (deceased), Keziah, Alyrah, Mary, George, Margery, Lottie, Victoria and Martha. Joel W. Smith was born in Limestone County, Ala., in 1826. He was reared on a farm, and received but little education, his father dying in 1852. Upon arriving at maturity he was married on November 25, 1845, to Elizabeth F. Lewis, also of Alabama nativity, and a child of William and Jane (Rogers) Lewis, being the second daughter in a family of ten children. Her birth occurred May 8, 1820. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of six children: Henrietta (Redus), John A., Edward F., Margaret J. (Yearby) Sarah F. (Alford), and Harriet A. (Sowel). Mr. Smith came to Arkansas in 1858, and settled in White County, whence he enlisted in 1862 in Company B of the Arkansas Infantry, under Capt. Critz, Col. Schofer being in command of the regiment. He was taken sick and received his discharge and returned home, but re-enlisted in 1863, under Col. Geyn. He was in the battle of Helena, and was taken prisoner and carried to Little Rock, later to Walton, Ill., and afterward to Rock Island, Ill., being confined until the close of the war. Mr. Smith has a farm of 300 acres, with over 200 under cultivation. He is a member of Centre Hill Lodge No. 114, A. F. & A. M., and himself and wife belong to the Baptist Church. Mr. Smith is a strong Democrat, and has been school director for the past six years, taking great interest in the work.

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Frank W. Smith, Searcy, Ark. Another pioneer settler of the county, and a much-respected citizen is the above-mentioned gentleman who came to White County, Ark., in 1853, from Mississippi. He was born in Fayette County, Miss., in 1833, and was the eighth in a family of nine children, the result of the union of John and Rebecca Smith, natives of Tennessee. The father was a planter, and in connection carried on merchandising at Oxford, Fayette County, Miss. In 1830 he moved to Benton County, Ark., remaining there a short time, and then returned to Mississippi in 1831, making that his home until his death which occurred at Oxford, Miss., in 1844. His widow survived him many years, came to White County in 1853, and there her death occurred in the fall of that year. Their family consisted of the following children: Harrison (married, and a farmer of De Soto County, Miss.), Benjamin (married, and resides in Gray Township), Margaret (wife of William Graves, of Howard County, Ark.), Catherine (died in White County, Ark., in 1889; she was the wife of John Boggs), Thomas (married and resides in Gray Township), William (died in White County in 1871), John (married and resides in Gray Township), Frank W. and Mary (wife of James Neavill; she died in 1858). The father of these children participated in the War of 1812. Frank W. Smith's youth in growing up was passed in attending to duties about the home place, and in the subscription schools of Mississippi. He commenced farming for himself in White County, Ark., at the age of twenty-one, and in 1855, in partnership with his brother, John, purchased 160 acres of land which he improved. Later the brothers separated, each doing for himself. F. W. Smith has erected all the buildings, and has added to his farm from time to time until he is now the owner of 400 acres, with 150 under cultivation, and 100 acres or more in pasture. He does mixed farming, raises corn and cotton and also considerable horses and cattle, and is one of the wide-awake farmers of the county. He enlisted in the army at Searcy in 1862, and for twelve months was in Capt. Davis' company, Gen. McRae's regiment. He participated in several skirmishes and later went into the State troops, where he remained but a short time. At the close of the service he returned to the farm. He was married in White County in 1855 to Miss Mary L. Neavill, a native of Alabama, and the daughter of Elihu and Margaret (Jones) Neavill, natives of Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. Neavill came to White County in 1844, settled in Gray Township, and he was one [p.243] of the influential men of the county, being treasurer of the same one term. His death occurred in 1852 and the mother's in 1888. After marriage Mr. Smith settled where he now resides, and there he has since remained. Although not very active in politics he votes with the Democratic party; is a member of the Agricultural Wheel, of which organization he was steward, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. To this union two living children were born: Sarah and Kirby (of which Kirby is married and resides with his father). Mr. Smith came to this county when all was wild and unbroken, and when game was in abundance. Now fine farms cover the country, and everything is in a prosperous condition. He is practically a self-made man; having started with little he is now very comfortably fixed, and can pass the remainder of his life in ease.

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William Smith. Faulkner County is rapidly coming into a position as one of the foremost stock counties in the State, and it is but uttering a plain fact to say that to a few men in this community is due the credit for advancing stock interests here and establishing a reputation in this department which is bound to stand for years. Mr. Smith has had not a little to do toward developing the stock matters of this region and if for no other account he is accorded a worthy place in this volume. His parents, Ebenezer and Permelia (Murphy) Smith, were married in Tennessee, in 1823, but the former was born in the State of Mississippi. He was left fatherless when a small boy, his paternal parent dying in Georgia, after which his widowed mother moved with her family to Tennessee, where she died, having borne a family of five sons and two daughters. Ebenezer Smith and his wife became the parents of eleven children, who grew to manhood and womanhood, seven of whom were born in Mississippi and four in Tennessee. After the mother's death in 1855, Mr. Smith married again, his second wife being Miss Elizabeth Chambers of Mississippi, their marriage being solemnized in 1856; six children were born to this union. William Smith, our subject, was reared to a farm life and received a limited education in the subscription schools of Tishomingo County, Miss. He grew to manhood, and on April 26, 1856, was married there to Miss Melvina Dotson, the wedding taking place at the home of the bride's parents, William and Nancy (Bales) Dotson. Victoria A., their eldest child, was born March 26, 1859, and June 14, 1874, became the wife of D. A. Thornton, a farmer who resides in Faulkner County, by whom she has four children. Sidney, the youngest child, was born August 15, 1860, and died August 24, 1864. September 15, 1886, witnessed the celebration of Mr. Smith's second marriage to Mrs. Mattie E. (Tucker) Beasley, daughter of LaFayette and Jane (Knight) Tucker, who were born in Mississippi, the father being of Irish origin. At the age of twenty-one years, Mr. Smith's father made him overseer of his plantation, and for his services gave him a one-fourth interest in the profits of the farm, and at the end of one year he had accumulated sufficient property to enable him to purchase eighty acres of land, all of which was heavily covered with timber. During the six following years, he cleared thirty acres of this tract, and erected thereon a dwelling-house, and the necessary outbuildings. Owing to the turbulent state of affairs during the war be, with his wife and children and a few articles of household furniture, removed by wagon to near Union City, Ky., making their home there for about ten months, and raising one crop. They next settled in Tennessee, near Island No. 10, and here Mr. Smith left his family and went to Paducah, Ky., where he enlisted in the First Kentucky Calvary, Confederate States Army, and served six months or until the close of the war. He then returned to his family and soon after purchased 100 acres of wild land in Gibson County, and this he resided on and continued to improve until 1870, since which time he has been a resident of the State of Arkansas. The farm upon which he is now residing consists of 243 acres, the original purchase consisting of 160 acres. Only a small portion of this land had been cleared, but at the present writing seventy acres are in high state of cultivation, the soil being well adapted to the raising of cotton, corn, oats and all varieties of vegetables. Both Mr. Smith and his wife are professors of religion, the [p.244] former a member of the

Missionary Baptist Church, and the latter of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Smit is a supporter and member of the Agricultural Wheel, belonging to El Paso Lodge No. 158, is a man of enterprise and progress, and being hospitable and generous is a valuable addition to the county of his adoption.

 

Abner F. Smith received his education at the high schools of Powhattan County, Va., but left his implements of study and literary pursuits in May, 1861, to take up the instruments of war. Joining the Confederate army he entered the Powhattan Rifle Company and was in the battles of Prairie Grove, Cotton Plant, Helena, Little Rock, Jenkins' Ferry, and a number of skirmishes. After the war Mr. Smith went to Grand Glaize, Ark., and commenced farming, and in 1870 engaged in the grocery business in partnership with John Thurman. Two years later he started alone, but the credit business proved unprofitable to him and he embarked in the timber business, being engaged in getting out ties for the Iron Mountain Railroad. In 1886 he opened up a store in Bald Knob, and is now enjoying a large and lucrative patronage. Abner T. Smith was born in Chesterfield County, Va., in 1843, being the son of William S. and Elizabeth (Edwards) Smith. The former was a railroad contractor and also contractor for public works while in Virginia, but after his removal to Arkansas carried on merchandising at Grand Glaize. He was a Whig in politics, and belonged to the Masonic order at the time of his death, which occurred in 1864, when forty-eight years old. Mrs. Smith has long been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. She was born in 1815 and is still living in Bald Knob, Ark. In this family were six children, only two of whom are living: Abner F. (our subject) and Alonzo (who is in business with his brother). Mr. Smith was married February 22, 1867, to Miss Fanny Heard, daughter of Baily E. Heard. She died in 1873, leaving three children, only one of whom is living: William B., a student at Searcy College, and who intends entering a law school after graduating at Searcy. June 24, 1874, Mr. Smith married Lucy C. Patrick, who died April 20, 1871, leaving one child: Edward A. He was married to his present wife, Adeline Allen, March 4, 1876. Mrs. Smith is a daughter of Dr. John Allen, of White County, and is the mother of one daughter: Mamie. Mr. Smith is a strong Democrat and belongs to the Masonic order, also holding membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. While in Jackson County he was appointed justice of the peace by Gov. Garland.

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Dr. J. A. Snipes, Searcy, Ark. The career of Dr. Snipes as a physician and surgeon has long been well and favorably known to the many who have tested his healing ability, and his popularity as a druggist is firmly established. He owns a good two-story brick business building, 100x30 feet, carries a full line of drugs, paints, oils, etc., and does a thriving trade. He first engaged in the drug business in the early part of 1885, and since then he has been thus employed. He was born in Orange County, N. C., in 1825, was the third in a family of seven children born to E. P. and Nancy (Burnett) Snipes, natives of North Carolina, the father born in 1800 and the mother in 1801, and in Orange and Chatham Counties, respectively. The parents were married in Chatham County, N. C., in 1821, and the father followed agricultural pursuits there until 1845, when he moved to Madison County, W. Tenn. After residing there until 1854 he moved to Haywood County, Tenn., purchased an improved farm, and still owns 560 acres in Jefferson County, with 350 acres under cultivation. The father is still living, and makes his home with the Doctor. He has been a very industrious, energetic man, was magistrate of several counties, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for sixty years. The mother died in Madison County, Tenn., in 1857. The paternal grandparents, Thomas and Martha (Williams) Snipes, were natives of the Old Dominion, and moved to North Carolina when children. The maternal grandparents, Isaiah and Jane (Herndon) Burnett, were natives of North Carolina, and always made that State their home. They died many years ago. The seven children born to E. P. and Nancy (Burnett) Snipes are named as follows: Walter A. (married, and in 1856 came to [p.245] White County, locating in Marion Township, followed farming, and there remained until 1857, when he went to Jefferson County, and there continued his former occupation; his death occurred in the winter of 1884-85, and he left one child, William E., who is a machinist and resides in Jefferson County, Ark.), Eliza J. (widow of C. B. Horton, resides at the Doctor's), Dr. J. A., Farrington B. (married, resides in Madison County, Tenn., and is a lawyer and farmer), Julia A. (now Mrs. Allen, of Brownsville, Tenn.), Martha M., (now Mrs. J. T. Key, of Searcy, Ark.) and Thomas J. (who enlisted in the army in Jefferson County in 1862, and died of smallpox in Mississippi two years later). Dr. J. A. Snipes was reared to farm labor and was favored with such educational advantages as the district schools of that day afforded. After coming to Tennessee he engaged in teaching and also read medicine for about three years, subsequently attending that far-famed institution, the Jeffersonian Medical College, at Philadelphia, Penn., in 1848. In 1851 he began the practice of medicine in Dyer County, Tenn., thence in 1852 went to Madison County, Tenn., and finally in 1854 came to White County, locating in Searcy, and has practiced his profession in White County continuously for thirty-five years. He is one of the earliest practitioners and is one in whom all have confidence. Aside from his practice he has also been engaged in farming in this and Marion Townships. He resided in the last-named township from 1856 to 1868, and opened up a large farm in Big Creek. He has resided in Searcy since 1868, with the exception of three years, when he resided on his farm in the suburbs. Dr. Snipes was married in Lauderdale County, Tenn., in December, 1853, to Miss Elizabeth J. Murphy, a native of Halifax County, Va., and the daughter of Thomas and Lucy (Coleman) Murphy, natives of Virginia. Her father died in that State, and the mother afterward immigrated to Tennessee (1842), thence to Searcy in 1854, and made her home with the Doctor until 1867, when she was killed in the memorable cyclone of May 27 of that year. By this union five children were born, three now living: Anna B. (now Mrs. W. H. Lightle, of Searcy), Minnie (now Mrs. John T. Hicks, of Searcy) and Emmett (a pharmacist in the drug store of the Doctor). Mrs. Lightle has four children: Minnie H., Edward J., Bettie K and Julian. Mrs. Hicks has two children: Everett B. and Willie Burnett. The Doctor's deceased children are named as follows: Everett (died, in 1876, at the age of eighteen years, and Camillus (died, in 1874, at the age of fourteen years). Socially, the Doctor is a member of Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., and is a member of Tillman Chapter No. 19, R. A M. He is also a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge at Searcy. Dr. Snipes has seen the full growth and development of Searcy during the many years of his residence here. What is now Mrs. Chambless' hotel was the court house at that time, and many and great have been the changes. He took an active interest in working for the location of the State University that was finally located at Fayetteville, but union not existing in Searcy, that city failed to get it. The Doctor, his wife and all the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dr. Snipes has always been deeply interested in educational matters.

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Omal H. Stanley is the eldest son of a family of eight children born to John H. and Elizabeth (Yancey) Stanley. John H. Stanley, born in about 1800, was a native of Halifax. Va., and a carriage-maker by trade, his marriage occurring in 1829. He afterward moved to Jackson, Tenn., where he went into the carriage business, and there he died in 1848, his wife following in 1873. O. H. Stanley learned the carriage-maker's trade of his father when a boy, and upon reaching manhood was married, in Jackson, Tenn., in 1852, to Jane M. Lauffort, originally from Madison County, Tenn., born in 1835. Her father held the office of county clerk in 1848 and for four years following, and in 1852 was elected county treasurer,

occupying this official position for two years. In 1856 he moved to Arkansas, where he died in 1862. fter his marriage, Mr. Stanley started a carriage shop at Jackson, remaining until 1860, when he removed to Austin, Prairie County, Ark., and carried on business there until 1864, excepting one year, while serving in the Confederate army, in Glenn's [p.246] regiment; he was in the quartermaster's department. Upon receiving his discharge, in 1864, he went to Perry County, Ill., but thirteen months after, or in September, 1865, came back to Arkansas, and settled at Devall's Bluff, where he took charge of the Government shops. Four years later he started a shop in Searcy, tarried two years, then moved to a farm on Dead River, where he remained four years, and in 1874 came to Cane Township, White County, purchasing 160 acres of wild land. This he has partially cleared (about sixty acres), and on it has erected a good house and other buildings. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley were the parents of ten children, nine of whom are still living: Edgar H. (deceased), James R., Jason C., Mary E. (now Mrs. Smith), Elanora, Willie B., Oscar L., Gertrude, Emma L. and Charles W. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. Stanley being chairman of the board of trustees. He is a strong emocrat in his political preferences, and takes an active interest in all movements for the good of the community.

J. W. Starkey is a representative and wide-awake farmer of White County, Ark., having been a resident in this county since 1870. He first saw the light of this world in Tuscaloosa County, Ala., in 1853, and was the second in a family of twelve children given to John B. and Nanoy (Weaver) Starkey, the former born in North Carolina and the latter in Alabama. They married in the latter State in 1851, and after clearing and living on a farm there until 1866, he immigrated to Itawamba County, Miss. Four years later he settled in White County, Ark.; here he purchased a partially improved farm of 160 acres, and now has 100 under the plow. In 1862 he enlisted from Alabama in the Confederate army, and served three years. His death occurred in White County, January 14, 1889, and at the time of his demise was counted one of the members of the Wheel organization. His wife still lives, and resides on the old homestead. Their children are: Martha A. (Mrs. Weeks), John W. (the subject of this sketch), D. A. (a resident of the county), E. J. (Mrs. Worthen, of Kentucky Township), N. B. (Mrs. Trorell, of the same township), M. F. (Mrs. Rissell, of the same township), R. C., Ellen, George Robert, Robert Bruce, William Bedford and Ollie B. John W. Starkey learned the carpenter's trade in his youth, in addition to becoming familiar with farm work, and received the greater part of his education in the schools of Mississippi. At the age of twenty-four he began farming for himself, and was married to Mattie Jones, a native of Georgia, purchasing soon after a timber tract of eighty acres, and now has fifty-five cleared and improved. He gives considerable attention to raising stock, and is succeeding in his enterprises. In politics he is a Democrat, and he, with his wife, worships with the Missionary Baptist Church, to which they belong. They are the parents of five children: John T., Alwilda, Nancy Jane, Grover Cleveland and Bersada. Mrs. Starkey is a daughter of Thomas F. and Nancy (Kilpatrick) Jones, who were native Georgians, the father a boot and shoe maker by trade. In 1870 he settled in Brownsville, Prairie County, Ark., but a year later removed to Searcy, White County, and, in 1885, to Texas, where he now resides. His wife died in Searcy, in 1873.

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Hon. Lee Thomas Stewart, a man who has held public office every year since he was twenty-one years old, of Beebe, Ark., was born in the county in which he is now residing on April 16, 1863, and is one of seven surviving members of a family of thirteen children born to Robert M. and Catherine (Walker) Stewart, from whom he inherits Scotch-Irish blood. The father and mother were born in North and South Carolina, respectively, and were among the early immigrants to White County, Ark., settling about ten miles from Searcy on the Searcy and Des Arc road. Here Mr. Stewart improved a farm and at the time of his death, in 1868, owned considerable land, of which seventy-five acres were under the plow. When the war broke out he owned fifteen slaves, but of course they were all lost during the Rebellion. R. M. Stewart moved to this State in 1856. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a Mason, standing high in this order and was buried with Masonic honors. He also helped build the first church and schoolhouse in the southern part of White County. The [p.247] following are the members of his family: Joseph (was born in 1842 and died during the war while in the hospital in Little Rock), Adaline (who was born in 1844 and became the wife of Isaac Chrisman, a farmer residing on the Arkansas River in Lonoke County), J. G. (who was born in 1846, and wedded Mrs. Nancy Carter nee Myrick; he is a school-teacher and farmer near Pine Bluff), Bettie (born in 1848, became the wife of Edward Barnes, a farmer and stockman of Texas, and died in November, 1882), D. M. (was born in 1850, he being also a farmer and stock trader, and he was married to Miss Allie Allen), Susan (was born in 1852 and died at the age of twenty-two), Robert G. (was born in 1854, and by occupation is a druggist being now a resident of the town of Dayton, Ark.), W. C. (was born in 1856, and he is a practitioner of dentistry at Dripping Springs, Tex.), Mollie (was born in 1858, and is the wife of Dr. J. D. Harris, of Butlersville, Ark.), Dora and Cora (were born in 1860, and are both deceased, Cora dying in infancy and Dora at the age of twelve years). The next in order of birth is Lee Thomas (our subject) and Rena (who was born in 1865, and died in infancy). Lee Thomas Stewart remained on his father's farm until about fifteen years of age and received the greater portion of his early education in the schools of Searcy, being an attendant at the high school for two years. After returning to the neighborhood in which he was reared he taught a subscription school for three months and the three following years worked as a tiller of the soil. After coming to Beebe he clerked in the general mercantile establishment of D. C. Harris for about eighteen months and then devoted the entire year of 1883 to the study of telegraphy, after which he went to Hoxie, on the Iron Mountain Railroad, where he held the position of telegraph operator for some time. In the winter of 1883 he returned to Beebe and resumed clerking in Dr. Harris' store, but the following year engaged in the same business with T. S. Neylon. This connection lasted for two years, then Mr. Stewart sold his interest and the next six months acted as book-keeper for J. M. Liles, after which he spent six months in the study of law. In January, 1888, he began clerking in the drug store of Dr. Ennis, but in the spring of 1889 was elected to the office of mayor of Beebe over his competitor, a popular gentleman, and is at the present time the incumbent of that office. He was elected by the Democrats to the position of alderman when only

twenty-one years of age and served two terms. Mr. Stewart is progressive in his views, liberal in his opinions and labors and contributes willingly to the advancement of the county and State and is an ardent advocate of education. Though thoroughly democratic in his views politically, he respects very highly the opinions of others who differ with him in matters generally.

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A. L. Stowell was born, reared and educated in Bureau County, Ill., the former event taking place August 8, 1841. Just after commencing his apprenticeship as a carpenter, the war broke out and Mr. Stowell, full of youthful enthusiasm, joined his destines with the cause of the Union, enlisting in Company B, First Battalion of Yeats' Sharpshooters, and served in Mississippi, being present at the battles of Corinth and New Madrid (Mo.). He was stationed one year at Glendale, near Corinth, after which his regiment returned to Illinois and was reorganized, or rather veteranized, into the Sixty-fourth Illinois Infantry. While serving in this capacity he was with Sherman on his march to the sea, and was at the siege of Atlanta, where he was under fire for sixty days. He carried his knapsack to Washington, D. C., and was present at the grand review. He was as well acquainted with the face of Gen. Sherman as that of a brother, and when the latter came to part with his command, on July 4, 1865, he made the division that Mr. Stowell was in a special speech and wept like a child, so warm a place had these veterans gained in his heart. The company was mustered out of service at Louisville, Ky., and was disbanded at Chicago, Ill., and for three years Mr. Stowell was president of the reunion of this command. He is now vice-commander of his post of G. A. R. After his return from the war he resumed the carpenter's trade, which had been so suddenly broken off, and continued this occupation at McComb, Ill., until 1883, at which time he settled in Beebe, [p.248] Ark., and engaged in fruit growing, making strawberries a specialty. In order to save his fruit he commenced making his strawberries into wine, some five years since, and in this enterprise has established a remunerative business. Mr. Stowell is a member of the I. O. O. F. and in his political views is a Republican. He was married March 19, 1867, to Miss Sarah B. Kissinger, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1843. The earliest facts known in the history of the Stowell family is that they were originally Normans, and removed to England with William the Conqueror, and were there knighted. Two brothers came from that country to the United States, one settling in California and the other in the eastern part of the United States, and all the Stowells in this country are their descendants. The parents of our biographical subject are Joshua and Amanda (Harrington) Stowell, the father being born in the Green Mountains of Vermont. He was a harness-maker by trade, and after residing for many years in Princeton, Ill., he removed to Chicago, where he is now living. The Harringtons were of German descent.

Henry Beverly Strange is a general merchant and farmer, of Beebe, Ark., and is well known throughout the county as a business man of honor and integrity. Like many other prominent men of the county he is a Tennesseean, his birth having occurred in Maury County, September 29, 1830, where he was also reared and educated. At the age of twenty years he started out in life for himself as a book agent, and for two years sold "The Southern Family Physician" and other books, meeting with signal success in this undertaking. In 1859 he came to White County, Ark., and engaged in business at Old Stony Point until 1872, when the Iron Mountain Railway reached Beebe, and in order to get a station at this point Mr. Strange built a depot and gave it to the company. He then moved his goods here and has since done a prosperous general merchandise business, being particularly successful in house furnishing. He has the largest business of any firm in the town, and his residence property is the finest in the place. He also has a store at Ward which nets a good income. He was first married in 1859 to Miss E. Ward, a native of North Carolina and a daughter of Whitman Ward, who was one of the prosperous farmers of Tennessee. Mrs. Strange died in 1870, leaving one child, Florence, wife of John Walker, five other children she bore having died in infancy. Mr. Strange married Sallie Apple in 1872, she having come from North Carolina to Arkansas at an early date, and their union resulted in the birth of three children, two of whom are living: Hubert (a youth of fourteen) and Vida (about sixteen years of age). Mrs. Strange is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he belongs to Beebe Lodge No. 145, A. F. & A. M., and also to the K. of H. and the A. L. of H. He is vice-president of the American Building, Loan & Savings Association, and is one of the public-spirited men of Beebe and takes an interest in all movements designed for the public good. He is a son of Beverly and Susanna (Martin) Strange, who were Virginians, and removed from that State to Tennessee shortly after marriage, and there engaged in farming. At the time of their deaths both were worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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William H. Strayhorn is a worthy descendant of Gilbert Strayhorn, who was a native of North Carolina, and was engaged in farming all his life. He died about 1835, having been the father of six children: John D., William James, J. K., Margaret and Rebecca. John D., the eldest, was born in Tennessee, in 1800, and was also a farmer by occupation. He married in 1829, Mary A. Stevenson, a Tennesseean by birth, and a daughter of Henry and Ann (Robinson) Stevenson. John D. Strayhorn was familiarly called major on account of being, as a general thing, the commanding officer on celebration days. He was a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church. To himself and wife only one child, a son, William H., was born. William H. Strayhorn first made his appearance upon the scenes of this world in Tennessee, in 1833. He moved to Arkansas, in 1850, with his grandfather Stevenson, who settled in White County; his father died and his mother marrying the second time, in 1840, W. R. Fortner. Mr. Strayhorn, in 1854, took for his wife Mary J. Burket, [p.249] daughter of William and Rachel (Hughs) Burket, natives of Tennessee, who moved to White County, Ark., in 1848. They have become the parents of eleven children (two of whom are deceased): Josiah, William H., John D., Samuel W., Alexander, Poney, Benjamin, Mary A., Rachel E., Elvira (deceased) and Elizabeth (deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Strayhorn are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The former settled on the farm upon which he now resides, July 14, 1856, having a place of 230 acres, 150 being under cultivation. He is a strong Democrat, and although not taking an active part in politics he has held the office of justice of the peace for two years, Mr. Strayhorn says he can raise any crop here that can be grown at all, and thinks Arkansas is the State of the Union.

 

Alfred B. Sutton's war experience is perhaps similar to that of many other soldiers, mentioned in this volume, but they are all interesting, and give the present generation some idea of the hardships and perils endured by the gallant and brave boys, thousands of whom now fill an unknown grave. In 1861 Alfred Sutton entered the Confederate service, and fought under Col. McCarver. His first serious engagement was at the battle of Corinth, Miss., from which he escaped serious injury. He was captured at Vicksburg, Miss., and taken to Indianapolis, where he remained for three months, then being removed to Port Delaware, and from there to Point Lookout on the Chesapeake Bay. In the latter place he was incarcerated for nine months and nine days, receiving his parole in December, 1864. He was in several engagements and skirmishes, but escaped serious wounds. After receiving his parole he returned to Camden to his command, and in 1865 was discharged, and at once returned to his home, resuming his former occupation of farming, which he has followed principally ever since. His father, Jesse Sutton, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1817, where he received his education, there marrying Elizabeth Hight, of the same State. Their union was blessed with a family of nine children, of whom Alfred B. is the second, his birth occurring in 1840. He was a farmer by occupation, owning 500 acres of excellent land at the time of his removal from Tennessee to Arkansas, in 1848. He located in Cleburne County, and there resided until his death in 1887, his wife having preceded him a few years. Mr. Sutton and his estimable companion were devout members of the Christian Church, and he was a man who took a great interest in all enterprises, especially those of an educational nature. Alfred B. received a common-school education in the schools of Arkansas, and in February of 1867 was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Bailey, daughter of Henry and Frances Bailey. To their union have been born a family of three children: Henry, Jesse L. and Nora L. Mr. Sutton is a prosperous farmer, and owns 160 acres in White County, and 200 acres in Cleburne County; of this amount 100 acres are in a high state of cultivation. He is Past Master of the Masonic lodge, and has represented that order in the Grand Lodge two different times, besides having held various other offices. He has served as school director for twelve years, and is a man respected and esteemed by the entire community.

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Rev. J. M. Talkington, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Searcy, took charge of the church at that place in December, 1888, but prior to that time, from 1885 to 1888, was presiding elder in the White River district, embracing about seven counties. He joined the White River Conference at Mount Zion in 1870, and was located in the Searcy circuit, consisting of several pastoral charges adjacent to Searcy and in White County. He remained on that work from 1871 to 1873, after which he received a call to West Point, and after remaining there some time, moved to the El Paso charge, where he was given the presiding eldership one year. He subsequently left the Searcy circuit, went to Lebanon circuit, then returned to El Paso circuit, thence to Helena district, then to the pastoral charge in Beebe in 1884, where he remained two years. From there he went to the Searcy district, remained there until 1888, and in that year received a call to the pastorate of Searcy Church. Mr. Talkington is a native of Jackson County, Ala., [p.250] where his birth occurred in 1835, and was the oldest in a family of nine children, the result of the union of Andrew Jackson and Mary Ann (Isbell) Talkington, natives of Alabama. The father was a farmer by occupation, opened up a plantation and remained on the same until his death, which occurred in 1856. The mother's death occurred in 1889, at the advanced age of seventy-three years. The father was a soldier in the Florida War. Their children were named as follows: J. M. (the subject of this sketch), Henry F. (married and resides in Union Township), Jane (died in Lonoke County, Ark., in 1887), Elizabeth (died in 1857, in Alabama), Margaret (wife of Joseph Pace, of Alabama), William T. (died in Alabama, in 1857), John (married, and is farming in Alabama), Vincent (died in 1855, in Alabama) and Mary S. (who died in Alabama, in 1855). Rev. J. M. Talkington was educated in the schools of Jackson County, Ala., and came to White County, Ark., at the age of nineteen, where he engaged as clerk for Isbell & Co., general merchants, and remained with them some time. In 1855 he engaged in teaching in Searcy, and followed this profession in White County for ten years. He was married in that county in 1856 to Miss Sarah A. Wright, a native of Independence County, Ark., and the fruits of this union have been sight children: Mary Ann (now Mrs. Arnold, in Gray Township), Julia (now Mrs. Sherrod, resides in Gray Township), Pearl Josephine, Virginia, James M., William Pierce, Cora Ann and John Wesley. While teaching school Mr. Talkington was also engaged in agricultural pursuits, and in 1867 was licensed to preach. From that date up to 1870 he did local work, and in 1877 he purchased a partly improved farm of 170 acres. This he has since improved, and has ninety acres under cultivation, with forty-five acres in fruit. He is deeply interested in horticulture, and now has one of the best fruit farms in the county, raising all variety of fruit that does well in this climate. Mr. Talkington was made a Mason in Searcy Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M.; is also a Mason of Tillman Chapter No. 19, R. A. M. In his pastoral work Mr. Talkington has organized many churches in the county, and has organized some of the principal churches in this and adjoining counties. He has seen a vast change in the county since living here, and the greatest is from a moral standpoint.

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Andrew B. Tate, a prominent citizen of Gray Township, is a native of South Carolina, and was born in Chester District, March 21, 1840, being the son of Samuel and Mary J. (Collins) Tate. Samuel Tate was also of South Carolina origin, as was his wife; they were married in Chester District, and moved to Lincoln County, Tenn, in 1841, where the remainder of their lives were passed. They were members in good standing of the Presbyterian Church, and held in high regard by all who knew them. Andrew's grandfather came to America from the Emerald Isle, at the age of twenty-seven and located in Chester District, S. C., where he was recognized as an influential and enterprising citizen. Mrs. Tate's people came from England. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Tate the following children were given them: William V., Andrew B. (the subject of this memoir), Agnes J., Sarah M., Robert J., Caroline and Tirzah A.; Lavenia G. and James L. (deceased). Samuel Tate died at the age of forty-nine, and his wife in 1866, at the age of sixty-three. The early days of Andrew B. Tate were spent in Lincoln County, Tenn., but when quite young began for himself as a farmer, which has been his principal avocation ever since. His home was in Lincoln County until 1877, when he decided that there was a better opening in Arkansas, to which place he came, locating in White County, and has never had cause to regret the change. He was married on February 6, 1879, to Miss Emma N. Wortham, a daughter of Young Wortham, and to their union two children have been born: Anna B. (born April 18, 1880) and Hettie B. (born April 26, 1885). Mr. and Mrs. Tate, in their religions sympathies, are with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Tate, in his political views is an uncompromising Democrat, and served in the late war, enlisting in the Confederate service in April, 1862, in Col. Stanton's regiment of Tennessee Infantry. On account of disability he was honorably discharged after three months' active [p.251] service. In social fraternities he is identified with

the Masonic order.

A. Byron Tapscott, M. D., although a young man, is one of the leading physicians of West Point, and has a large practice, enjoying a reputation of which many older in the professional experience might well be proud. Dr. Tapscott is a native of Tennessee, and a son of Ira and Mary (Jones) Tapscott, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. Ira Byron was also a physician, and a graduate of the Medical College of Richmond, Va. He was a surgeon in Forrest's cavalry, in the late war, and after that struggle practiced in Tennessee until 1872, when he removed to Arkansas, continued his professional duties at West Point. He was a strong Democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also of the I. O. O. F., and died in January, 1887, at the age of fifty-one years. Mrs. Tapscott is still living in West Point, and is the mother of five children, all living: A. Byron (our subject), Charles V. (an attorney), Emma J., Mary G. and Samuel F. At the age of fifteen Byron Tapscott commenced the study of medicine under his father's instruction, and in 1887 and 1888 attended the Missouri Medical College, at St. Louis. After graduating. he returned to West Point and embarked upon a career as a physician, also opening up a drug store, which he continued until October, 1889. Then he sold out, and has since devoted his whole attention to his rapidly increasing practice. He is firmly Democratic in his preferences, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Thomas P. Taylor is a prosperous agriculturist and fruit grower of White County, Ark., and was born in Carroll County, Tenn., being the only child of Hiram A. and E. A. (Moore) Taylor, the former a native of North Carolina, and one of a family of six children born to Peter Taylor and wife. In 1848 he moved to Tennessee, and was married there in 1852, his wife being a daughter of Wesley Moore, also of North Carolina. Hiram A. Taylor was a contractor by occupation, held the highest rank in the Masonic order, and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He died in Tennessee. Thomas P. Taylor has always resided on a farm, but since seven years of age has resided in White County, Ark., making his home with his mother, who died in 1878, being the wife of A. V. Van Meter. He received fair educational advantages, and in 1882 he was married to Miss Mattie Sharp, a daughter of T. H. Sharp of this State, who died at an early day, his wife's death occurring in 1880. After his marriage Mr. Taylor settled one and a half miles from Judsonia, and has 140 acres of his 700-acre farm under cultivation. He was at one time quite extensively engaged in the stock business, but now only raises enough for his own use. He has seen the county develop in a remarkable manner since his early location here, and has done his share in aiding in this development. He is independent in his political views, and votes for the man rather than the party. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and by Mr. Taylor has become the mother of two children: Irma (who died at the age of three years) and a boy by the name of James.

W. J. H. Taylor is a prominent farmer and stock raiser in Coffey Township, and a son of Newton W. and Ellen (Hickman) Taylor, natives of Alabama and Tennessee, respectively. Newton W. Taylor was born in Alabama in 1820, and was married in 1846, subsequently engaging in farming. In 1860 he moved to White County, Ark., and bought a quarter section of land, on which he resided until his death, in about 1879 or 1880. W. J. H. Taylor came upon the stage of action in Tennessee in 1848. He was married in 1870 to Miss Jennie Madith, of White County, and to them an interesting family of six children has been given: Maggie, Emmett, Albie, Wesley, Pearl and Newton. Since his marriage Mr. Taylor has farmed several different places, but is now located in Coffey Township, whither he came in 1885. He has a farm of eighty acres, with about fifty acres under cultivation, and in connection with farming has operated a cotton-gin until recently. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The former is a Democrat, and actively interested in schools, having long been school director of his district.

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[p.252] Manuel Teer is a representative citizen and a large tax payer of White County, owning over 1,000 acres of land, his fine home farm of 200 acres being under excellent cultivation. He enlisted in the Confederate army in 1862, and served throughout the war, taking part in Price's raid through Missouri from beginning to end. He was born in North Carolina on December 29, 1826, and was a son of Ludwick and Mary (Sheppard) Teer. The former's birth occurred in South Carolina in 1790; he was married in 1820, and died in his native State in 1858, a family of four children having blessed the union of himself and wife: Haywood S., Manuel, Francis E. and Susan J. (the widow of the late W. W. Horn). Manuel Teer came to Arkansas in 1857, and settled in White County, where he bought a farm. He was married in 1846 to Miss Martha J. Craig, of North Carolina origin, and a daughter of Abraham and Jane (Steel) Craig, who came to Arkansas in 1857, purchasing an improved farm of 160 acres in White County. Mr. Teer lost his esteemed wife on August 15, 1880. She had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, since thirteen years of age. Mr. Teer is connected with the Masonic order, and is a highly respected citizen, having always taken a great interest in the improvement and prosperity of the county. He has been a liberal donator to all religious and charitable institutions during his residence here, keeping thoroughly apace with the progress of the times. Mr. Teer has now retired from active life, and as he has been an industrious, energetic farmer all his life, can now rest in the consciousness of a career well and usefully spent.

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Prof. W. H. Tharp, president of Searcy College, Searcy, Ark. A glance at the lives of many representative men whose names appear in this volume will reveal sketches of some honored, influential citizens, but none more worthy or deserving of mention than Prof. W. H. Tharp. This gentleman was born in Fayette County, Tenn., on November 21, 1853, and was the eldest in a family of eight children, three now living, who blessed the union of Dr. W. H. and Susan Payne (Whitmore) Tharp, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Tennessee. The father was a prominent physician and surgeon, was married in Fayette County, Tenn., and there died, in 1869. The mother died in 1874. She was cousin to Bishop Payne. Grandfather W. H. Tharp was one of the leading and deservedly popular men of Fayette County, Tenn., and was chairman of the county court for many years. He moved from North Carolina when quite a young man. Though young, he was very prominent in his native county, and was a member of the General Assembly of the State. He was, repeatedly, strongly urged to become a candidate for a similar position in his adopted State, but always declined. Prof. W. H. Tharp graduated at Macon Masonic College, in 1871, and, the same year, was in school at Lexington, Ky. In 1872 he entered the U. C. College, at Toronto, Can., and from this college was called in 1873, by the declining health of his mother, whose death, in 1874, made it necessary for him to take charge of the farm and look after his younger brothers, both minors. Here he remained till 1879. While residing on the farm he was, for three years, principal of the Union Hill Academy. In 1879 he was engaged as president of the Male College at Somerville, Tenn. At the end of his year's work he was elected president of Female College, at Somerville, Tenn., where he remained until 1883, and then came to Searcy, Ark. While occupied in teaching at Somerville, he had charge of a county paper called The Falcon, which became very popular throughout the county, but he sold his interest on coming to Searcy, in 1883. Prof. Tharp was married in Tennessee, in 1874, to Miss Lizzie Joe Cocke, a native of Fayette County, Tenn., and the daughter of Thomas R. and Laura (Winston) Cocke, also of Tennessee origin. Her father was a statute lawyer of fine ability, and was county judge for many years, never being defeated. His death occurred in 1886. The mother is still living and resides in Somerville, Tenn. Mrs. Tharp received her education in Somerville Female Institute and Columbia Institute. She is a member of the Ladies' State Central Committee, editor of the children's column of the Arkansas Baptist, and is a smooth and clear writer. She has always been [p.253] a very valuable assistant to Prof. Tharp in his school work. For the past six years Prof. Tharp has given his time and energies

to Searcy College, which he projected, and, together with Prof. Conger, founded in 1883. No institution in the State has more character for thorough work than Searcy College. Prof. Tharp is a man of progressive ideas, and has always taken a deep interest in educational matters. That his work and ability have gained recognition in the State of his adoption is evidenced by the fact that he is at present the president of both the State Teachers' Associations and the arkansas Summer Normal School. He is also managing editor of the Arkansas Educational Journal, a live and progressive monthly. To his marriage were born two children: William J. and Kathleen. Prof. Tharp and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

J. C. C. Thomas has been from earliest boyhood familiar with the duties of farm work, and is now also extensively engaged in ginning cotton. He was born in Richmond County, N. C., in 1834, and in 1869 came to Arkansas and settled in Independence County, and after farming there one year, came to White County. He acquired a good education in his youth, and after attending the common schools of his native county, he entered Rockingham Academy, which he attended three years. After commencing the battle of life for himself, he removed to Louisiana in 1856, locating near Monroe, and there bought land. From this State he enlisted in the Confederate army the first year of the war, being a member of Company B, Fourth Louisiana Battalion, and served by re-enlistment until the close of the war, participating in the battles of

Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain and others. After his return home he spent two years in raising crops, then spent one year in Independence County, and has since resided in White County. He was married here in March, 1875, to Susan L. Watkins, a native of Alabama, and by her has four, children living: Sarah A., Grover C., Carlyle and Clifton B. Although Mr. Thomas votes the Democrat ticket, he is not an active politician. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church, and he is a believer in the doctrine of that denomination. In 1876 he purchased a farm comprising 204 acres of land, but now 360, and has 160 acres under cultivation. He also owns one of the oldest cotton-gin stands in the county, and does quite an extensive business in that line. He is one of eight children born to William C. and Sarah A. (Williams) Thomas, the former born in North Carolina, and the latter in Cumberland Island, Ga. Their union took place in the former State, and the father was well known in the community in which he lived, as a successful planter. He was also a millwright and erected the first cotton-gin in Richmond County, N. C. He died in North Carolina in 1852, preceded by his wife in 1848. Grandfather Thomas was an Englishman, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The maternal grandfather was born in Wales and was a Tory during the Revolution.

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John A. Thome, M. D., numbered among the rapidly rising practitioners of White County, received his education in this county, and at Union Academy in Gibson County, Ind., after which he worked on his father's farm until twenty-three years of age. During this period he studied medicine at home, and in 1877-79 attended lectures at Evansville Medical College from which he graduated February 27, 1879. Returning thence to West Point he commenced at once the active practice of his profession, which he has continued with such success as stamps him undoubtedly one of the thorough, capable, professional men of the community. Dr. Thome was born in Gibson County, Ind., November 29, 1854, being the son of Jacob and Isabella . (Hayhurst) Thome. The former came originally from Prussia (near Berlin) where his birth occurred on March 26, 1818; he emigrated to this country by way of New Orleans, in 1848, first locating in Evansville, Ind., but in 1865 removed to Arkansas and settled near West Point, on a farm on which he resided until his death on February 26, 1888. Mrs. Thome was born near Troy, Ohio, on January 8, 1833, and is still living in this county with some of her children. They were the parents of nine children, five of whom survive: John A. (our subject), David C., Alice (wife of C. W. Davis), Nathallia [p.254] (wife of J. R. Riner) and Naomi (wife of James Thomas). Dr. Thome was united in marriage on June 22, 1882, with Miss Fouzine McCallister, who was born at West Point November 2, 1864. They have two daughters: Evia I. and Vera B. Dr. Thome is a strong Democrat, and as popular socially as he is in professional circles.

James Wair has been a farmer all of his life and has harvested his fiftieth crop, thirty-one of which have been raised in this county. This experience has given him a wide and thorough knowledge of the affairs of agricultural life. Born in Western Tennessee on December 20, 1814, he was the seventh son of H. and Jane (Ware) Wair. After reaching manhood Mr. Wair was married in June, 1844, to a Miss Bobson, who died in 1858 leaving five children: William, Mary, Martha, Margaret and Tennessee. Following this event he moved to Arkansas in the fall of 1858, and settled in White County, where he bought a quarter section of land. Mr. Wair's second marriage occurred in 1860, Mrs. Elizabeth Low, a widow, and a daughter of Edwin Perergrew, of Georgia, becoming his wife. She departed this life in 1873, leaving six children: James E., Frank B., Lucy V., Ellen T., George H. and Lawrence V. Mr. Wair and each wife were members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Democrat in politics and a highly respected citizen.

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Capt. Calvin Calkins Waldo is a successful gardener and fruit grower, residing in White County, Ark., and like the majority of people who claim New York as the State of their nativity, he is enterprising, intelligent and thrifty He was born in Genesee County, January 16, 1829, and is a son of Samuel and Mercy (Calkins) Waldo, the former of French descent and a native of Oneida County, N. Y., where he was born in 1794. The family belong to the ancient and honored Waldenses family, and first became represented in America in 1650. Robert and Benjamin Waldo were private soldiers in a Connecticut regiment during the Revolution, and in the battle of Brandywine Robert was killed by a Hessian ball. The maternal ancestors were of Scotch-Irish descent, and were members of the Primitive Baptist Church and were represented in the Revolutionary War by the maternal great-grandfather of our subject, Joshua Calkins, who served as commissary in Gen. Washington's immediate army from 1775 to 1783. He died in 1838, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. Daniel Calkins, the paternal grandfather, commanded a company in the War of 1812, and served six months, but afterward died of disease contracted while in the service, at the age of fifty-seven years. The parents of our subject were married about 1827, and became the parents of six children: Calvin C., Minerva S. (born March 31, 1831, married Joseph Cooper, of Wyoming County, N. Y.), Permelia (born in 1833, and was married to Moses H. Tyler, of Utica, Ind.), Daniel S. (born in 1835, and married Mrs. Julia Gardner, of Jonesville, Mich.), Lloyd Garrison (born in 1837 and died at the age of four years) and Maria (born in 1839, and married Samuel Cooper, a brother of Joseph Cooper). Capt. Waldo (our subject) received the education and rearing which is accorded the majority of farmers' boys, and after attending the common schools he entered the Perry Center Academy for one year, and at the age of twenty-three years graduated from Middlebury Academy, a normal school of good standing. During the winter of 1851-52, previous to graduating, he taught the district school at La Grange, N. Y., and he afterward taught a four-months' term at Leroy. During the winters of 1853-54 and 1854-55 he taught school at Elyria, Ohio, and in 1856 immigrated to Jeffersonville, Ind., and in February of that year was united in marriage to Miss Polly Jane Raymond, a native of Columbia County, N. Y., and a graduate of Mrs. Willard's Female College of Troy, N. Y. In her girlhood she was a pupil of Mrs. Lyons, at Mount Holyoke, Mass., and was a teacher in the Methodist school at Bards-town, Ky., at the time she formed Mr. Waldo's acquaintance, having previously taught in a female seminary at Murfreesboro, Tenn. After their marriage they engaged in teaching a select subscription school in Jeffersonville, Ind., continuing two years. Mr. Waldo having for some time spent his leisure moments in the study of law was admitted to the bar of Charleston, Ind., moving the same [p.255] year to Utica of that State, where he again began teaching, holding the position of principal of the schools for the period of one year. In 1859 he opened a female boarding and day school, of which his wife became principal, but deeming the facilities for practicing law much better at the county seat, he removed to Charleston, where he followed the practice of law until the spring of 1861. Upon hearing of the bombardment of Fort Sumter he and others began immediately to raise a company for the three months' service, and Mr. Waldo was elected orderly-sergeant and reported with his company to Gov. Morton, but in consequence of the quota of Indiana being full they were disbanded. Later Mr. Waldo assisted in raising a company for the Twenty-second Indiana Regiment, then assisted Capt. Ferguson in raising a company for the Twenty-third Indiana Regiment. For the money expended and the service rendered in his patriotic and successful efforts to serve his country in her dire need he has never received one cent in compensation, or even a favorable notice. In July, 1861, he, with the assistance of Cyrus T. Nixon, of Charleston, Ind., raised sixty men for Company F, Thirty-eighth Regiment Indiana Infantry, and owing to Mr. Nixon's illness reported in person to Adj-Gen. Noble, of Indianapolis, who assigned him and his company to camp duty at New Albany, Ind. Here he was elected captain of his company, known as Company, F; Thirty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Col. B. F. Scribner, but through the latter's instrumentality he was deposed and a favorite, Wesley Connor, put in his stead. Owing to the dissatisfaction caused by these proceedings about two-thirds of the commissioned officers left the regiment, among whom were Judge Gresham, who was at that time lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. Many private soldiers also left the company, the Hon. Lee Clow, now of Hempstead County, Ark., being among the number. After leaving his command Mr. Waldo returned to Charleston, and during the remainder of 1861 and the summer of 1862 he was engaged in the practice of law, but in the latter year was also engaged in assisting the Hon. W. H. English in recruiting a regiment, which afterward became the Ninety-fifth Indiana Infantry. He was commissioned first lieutenant, but relinquished his position to one of the aspirants of the regiment for promotion, and then began assisting in raising another company, known as Company I, Eighth Regiment Indiana Legion, and was chosen orderly-sergeant. The only important service rendered by this regiment was in repelling Morgan in his raid of 1863, after which it was disbanded and Mr. Waldo removed with his family to his native State (New York). Here, after a short time, he enlisted as a private in Company F, Second New York Veteran Cavalry, was commissioned captain of provost guard, and was on duty at Lockport, N. Y. In November he reported to his company, at Geisboro Point, D. C., and February 1, 1864, the regiment embarked on a steamer for New Orleans, La., where they arrived the same month, being five days over due, on account of a severe storm. He was with Gen. Banks in the disastrous Red River campaign, and was seriously injured while making a cavalry charge by his horse stumbling and falling on him, and as a result, was confined to the hospital at New Orleans for thirty days, after which he again joined his regiment, and in February, of the following year, he embarked with his regiment, at Lake Ponchertrain, for Mobile, and while marching overland from Barancas Island to that city, they met Gen. Clerndon, of the Confederate service, whom they defeated, wounded and captured. After assisting in the reduction of Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort, they routed and captured a Confederate cavalry force, which had annoyed them during the siege of Mobile. After the capture of the latter city the regiment was ordered to Talladega, Ala., where Capt. Waldo was detached from his company and sent to Jacksonville, Ala., as quartermaster's clerk, remaining until September, 1865. He was mustered out of service at Talladega, Ala., November 8, 1865, went to Mobile, and there doffed his suit of blue and donned citizen's clothes once more. He returned to Utica, Ind., to which place his family had previously returned. Here his wife suddenly died, as did also a little son, four years [p.256] old, leaving his home desolate indeed. During the succeeding three years he followed teaching and such other occupations as his impaired health would permit, but his health grew no better, and thinking that a change of climate might prove beneficial, he removed to Jo Daviess County, Ill., in the spring of 1869, where he followed teaching and prospected for lead. In 1872 he went to Osceola, Iowa, and was employed by the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Company, in detecting and bringing to justice county swindlers, in which he was successful. In the latter part of the same year he returned to Illinois, where he again engaged in teaching school. The following year he went to Salem, Iowa, and was there united in marriage to Miss Elvira Garretson, and in September of that year he removed to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he purchased a farm adjoining the corporation, and began market gardening and fruit raising. This occupation received his attention for about six years, with the exception of one year which he spent traveling in the interests of the Howe Truss Company, being present at the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Three years later he again settled in Salem, and in consequence of ill health, again took up teaching as an occupation, and was also engaged in canvassing for a book. In 1882 he became a resident of Arkansas, visiting the famous Ravenden and Eureka Springs in search of health, but returned to Salem in April, 1882, where he was called upon to mourn the death of his wife, June 3, after an illness of about three weeks. She left two children: Grace (born in June, 1874) and Frank S. (born in February, 1876). Since March, 1884, Mr. Waldo has been a resident of Beebe, Ark., and has confined his attention to market gardening and fruit growing. He has been a member of several secret societies, but through indifference, is not an active member of any at the present time. He is a Republican, and holds a membership in the Missionary Baptist Church.

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J. T. Walker is a merchant and farmer of Dog Wood Township, and in his relations with the public has won the respect and esteem of all, for he is honest, upright and attends strictly to his business. His birth occurred in Rutherford County, Tenn., and he was the third child born to George and Anna E. (Barkley) Walker, the former a native of Virginia, born in 1807. His early life was spent in his native State, but when still quite young he was taken to Tennessee, and there the nuptials of his marriage to Miss Rebecca Keilouct were celebrated. She died after they had been married only a short time, and in 1842 Mr. Walker espoused Anna E. Barkley, a daughter of Andrew J. and Hannah Barkley, who were Virginians. Mrs. Walker was born in Tennessee, and the following are the children born to her union with Mr. Walker: William B., Andrew J., Henry B., Hannah C. (Mrs. Allen, living in White County), Martha J. (Mrs. Crisp, also residing in White County), Sallie A. (Mrs. Shoffner, a resident of the county), George R. and Mary E. (Mrs. Ferrell, who is now deceased). In 1850 Mr. Walker moved to White County, Ark., and at the time of his death, in 1872, was the owner of about 1,000 acres of land, of which 125 were under cultivation. He was a Republican, and died in the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His widow survives him, and resides in White County with her children. Up to the age of thirteen years J. T. Walker resided in the State of Tennessee, but after coming to Arkansas he acquired a good education in the common schools, and in 1867 started out in life for himself. He opened up a farm, and in December, 1872, was married to Jennie C. Shoffner, a daughter of Dr. A. C. and Julia A. Shoffner, who removed from Mississippi to White County, Ark., in 1870. Mr. Walker and his wife have five children who are living, and one, Daisy, who died at the age of seventeen months: Evelina, Louella, James D., Lorambla and Maxie are those living. Mr. Walker is a Democrat, and in 1878 was elected to the office of magistrate, and held the position four years. He and wife belong to the Baptist Church, and he is deeply interested in the cause of education, and has held the position of school director of his district for about twelve years. He owns about 500 acres of land, with 200 acres well improved, and for some time has been engaged in merchandising at Walker's Store, the place taking its name from him. He is [p.257] doing well in both enterprises, and fully deserves the success which has attended his efforts. He is a grandson of Bird Walker.

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Walker & Ford. This firm comprises one of the prominent and reliable business houses of Beebe, and is composed of Robert C. Walker and J. A. Ford, two of the honorable and upright men of the county. The senior member of the house, Mr. Walker, was born in Marshall County, Miss., March 16, 1850, his parents, Rev. Charles B. and Jane O. (Jelton) Walker, having been born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The father was born May 26, 1811, and moved with his parents to Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1818, where he embraced religion in December, 1829, becoming a member of the Baptist Church the following year. He was ordained a minister of that denomination on November 17, 1839, and on October 4, 1841, was married to Miss Jelton, and with her removed to Arkansas in 1858, locating at Stony Point, where he engaged in general merchandising. Later he followed the same occupation at Beebe, and was here residing at the time of his death, in 1872, his wife's death occurring three years later. The latter was a daughter of Isaac and Anna Jelton, of Rutherford County, Tenn., and for three years after her marriage lived in Lamar County of that State, then made her home in Marshall County, Miss., until 1858, after which they removed to White County. They were abundantly blessed with worldly goods, and Mr. Walker showed excellent judgment in selecting land, and was very prosperous in his mercantile enterprise. Their son, Robert C. Walker, spent his early life in Mississippi, attending school there and in Arkansas, but after becoming thoroughly familiar with the common branches he entered Hickory Plains Institute, attending one year (1868). After teaching a three months' term of school he entered the State University of Fayetteville, as a beneficiary for White County, but at the end of nine months was called home by the death of his father, and did not again enter school, but remained at home to care for his mother, which he continued to do until her death. He was married in 1875 to Miss Sallie Percy, a native of Jackson, Tenn., and to them were born two children: James (born August 29, 1877) and Ollie (born October 12, 1879), the mother's death following the birth of the latter, October 24. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a faithful wife, mother and friend, and her death was deeply lamented by all. In January, 1881, Mr. Walker espoused Miss Mattie L. Scott, of Arkansas, whose father, John Scott, was a farmer of Mississippi and later of Arkansas, but died at Selma, Ala., in 1862. This union resulted in the birth of four children: Sallie (born February 11, 1885), Minnie and Winnie (twins, born July 28, 1886, and died August 2, 1886), and Viola (born October 7, 1887). The first experience Mr. Walker had was in settling his father's estate, he being one of the executors. He was afterward associated in business with Mr. Westbrooks, continuing with him until 1875, following farming from that time till February, 1888. At that date he and Mr. Ford purchased their present stock of goods, and, owing to their genial dispositions and excellent business qualifications, their union has prospered. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Ford, the junior member of the firm, was born in Georgia, December 4, 1851, his native county being Whitfield. His parents, Joseph R. and Palmyra (Cowan) Ford, were also natives of Georgia, and until the war the father was a wealthy merchant of Dalton, and wielded a wide influence in the politics of the State. He was for a long time collector of his county, and represented the same one term in the legislature. He served as orderly-sergeant in the Confederate army during the war, and upon being taken captive was imprisoned for fifteen months at Camp Chase, Ohio. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, and are residing at Bellevue, Tex. J. A. Ford is the second of their eight children, the other members of the family being as follows: George (who is circuit and county clerk of Clay County, Tex.), Marion (who is a conductor on the Alabama & Chattanooga Railroad), Edward (a salesman at Poplar Bluff, Mo.), Joseph (a ranchman near Bellevue, Tex.), and Robert L. and Lawrence (who reside with their parents in Texas), Ava (the only sister, is the wife of Robert Miller, a stockman at Gainesville, Tex.). J. A. Ford received [p.258] his education at Dalton, Ga., and Flint Springs, Tenn. At the age of nineteen years he began life for himself, and after teaching school for several years he clerked one year, embarking in business on his own account in 1873, doing a general business. Owing to failing health, he was compelled to give up this work for awhile, and accordingly sold his goods and returned to Georgia, where he was engaged in farming until 1876, at which time he came to Arkansas. After farming three years in Conway County, he came to Judsonia, agriculture receiving his attention here also, and in the fall of 1883 bought a farm near Beebe. In 1886 he became associated with Mr. Campbell in the mercantile business, and until February, 1888, the firm was L. Campbell & Co., since which time it has been Walker & Ford. January 31, 1879, Mr. Ford was married to Miss Lane, a native of Georgia. She was reared in Missouri, and is a daughter of John F. Lane, a prominent attorney at law of Poplar Bluff, Mo. He and wife have four children: George L. (born December 4, 1870), Samuel E. (born September 14, 1881), Joseph Lee (born November 8, 1883) and Palmyra (born August 16, 1887). Mr. and Mrs. Ford are members of the Baptist Church, and he belongs to Beebe Lodge No. 145, A. F. & A. M., and has been a member of the I. O. G. T. He has the interest of the county at heart, and supports all movements tending to promote the public good.

 

W. T. Wallis has been a resident of White County since 1856, acquiring during this time an enviable reputation as a citizen of energy and enterprise, and a man honest and conscientious in his walk and transactions. A native of Tennessee, he is a son of John and Mary (Bird) Wallis, originally from North Carolina, who had a family of eleven children: John B., Mary, Elizabeth, Myas, Rebecca, Josiah, Nancy, Doctern, Catharine, W. T. (the principal of this sketch) and three whose names are not given, and who were older than W. T. The father of our subject died when he was only two years old, the mother following six months later. W. T. Wallis was born in 1829, and spent his early days in Tennessee, starting out for himself, in 1851, first as a carriage-maker and then as farmer, to which occupation he has since given his attention. Removing to Mississippi, he was married there, in 1852, to Leamia E. Bromson, and in 1856 came to this county, where he entered 200 acres of land. At the beginning of the war Mr. Wallis enlisted in Col. Monroe's regiment, and served until the close of hostilities, participating in twenty-seven battles and skirmishes. His career as a soldier was honorable and effective. Mr. and Mrs. Wallis are the parents of eight children: John S., William H., Mary E., Martha A., Thomas, Patrick L., Annie E. and Lucinda V., all married and living in Arkansas, and most of them in this county. Mr. Wallis and wife elong to the Missionary Baptist Church, the former owns 1,000 acres of land, and has about 150 acres under cultivation, his stock numbering some two or three hundred head of cattle.

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Caleb Parker Warren. The connection of Mr. Warren with the interests of White County has proven to be a fortunate thing for its residents and especially for the citizens in and near El Paso, as a perusal of the sketch will testify. He is a son of Thomas and Rebecca (Wright) Warren, who were born in North Carolina, and immigrated to West Tennessee about 1820, and were there married in 1833. They came to Arkansas in the fall of 1856, and located in the country then known as Royal Colony, purchasing 160 acres of wild land, on which they erected a double log-house, this being the first of the sort in the colony. In 1861 Mr. Warren enlisted as a private soldier in Dr. F. M. Christian's company, known as the Border Rangers, remaining in that capacity and with that command for four years and ten days. He took part in a number of battles and skirmishes, one in particular being the battle of Chickamauga, in which his company dismounted and fought as infantry. He was also at Shiloh and Corinth, and was under the famous Confederate cavalry commanders: Forrest, Wheeler, Hampton and Armstrong, but a greater portion of the time was with Forrest and Wheeler. His first experience in warfare was at Lost Creek, Mo., in 1861, and he surrendered with his command st Charlotte, N. C., at which time there was a request made by the commanding [p.259] officers of both armies for volunteers to go to Chesterville, S. C., to guard and serve the rations to the Confederate soldiers as they were paroled, the Government allowing the cavalry to retain their arms and horses. Mr. Warren finally arrived at home, June 15, 1865, having ridden his horse all the way. His first venture in business after his return was to invest in some cotton, making his purchase with money loaned him by a Mr. Hadley, who at that time had charge of the penitentiary at Little Rock, and his enterprise met with fair success. The next year he put in a crop on land deeded him by his father (160 acres), and to the thirty acres which were already under cultivation he improved and added ten more. These he devoted to cotton and corn in equal parts, but the second year he left his crop to be gathered by others and embarked in merchandising at El Paso, under the firm name of Warren & Son, his father furnishing the capital and receiving half the profits. At the end of eight years our subject became the sole proprietor, paying over to his father all the money he had furnished, and took into his employ O. P. Poole, and at the end of one year gave him an interest in the business. Mr. Poole's wife and three children were killed in the terrible cyclone of 1880; he and his little daughter, Martha J., being the only ones of the family to escape with their lives, but Mr. Poole was so badly injured that existence became unendurable, and in July of the following year he ended his weary life. Mr. Warren has since acted as guardian of his daughter, and has placed her in Ouachita Baptist College, Arkadelphia, Ark. Mr. Warren's wife, who was formerly a Miss Mary A. Harkrider, was born in Tennessee, and is a daughter of John and Eunice Harkrider, native Dutch. Their family are as follows: Mattie M., John Thomas, Rebecca Eunice, Mary P. and Cora V. These children have received excellent educational advantages, and the eldest has graduated from Searcy College, Arkansas, and is at present principal of the public school at El Paso, Ark. Thomas, after having spent several terms at the State University, Fayettville, Ark., took a course at Goodman & Eastman's Business College, Nashville, Tenn., and is filling the position of book-keeper for Warren & Phelps, the present style of the firm. The three youngest daughters are at Ouachita Baptist College. The family worship in the Missionary Baptist Church, and Mr. Warren is a member of the A. F. & A. M., El Paso Lodge, No. 65. He was born in Tennessee, January 21, 1840.

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Thomas Warren. He whose name heads this brief sketch, is one of White County's pioneers, and is an active and enterprising agriculturist, alive to all current issues, public spirited and progressive in all matters tending to benefit the community. His life has been an active one, and by his own industry and intelligent management, has secured a substantial footing among the citizens of White County. He was born in Edgecombe, County, N. C., September 22, 1814, and about the year 1820 he removed with his father, Caleb Warren, to the State of Tennessee, and was there reared to farm life. The schools of Tennessee were not of the best at this time, and were only conspicuous for their scarcity, therefore the educational advantages which Thomas received were of the most meager description. He learned to read a little, but never did an example in arithmetic in his life. In the year 1834 he was wedded to Miss Rebecca Wright, a daughter of John Harrison and Nancy (Whitiss) Wright, and a native of North Carolina, born on June 16, 1815. Their marriage resulted in the birth of ten children, whose names are as follows: Martha Ann (born November 22, 1834; was married December 31, 1853, to William J. Canada, who was killed while serving in the army. His wife died in 1869, leaving three children: Martha J., born in November, 1855, Thomas, born in December, 1857, and Joseph, born in 1859), Sarah E. (was born September 25, 1837, married Isaac Dougan, and bore him two children, both deceased), Caleb P. (born January 22, 1840), Matilda N. (born on March 22, 1842, and married Dr. M. Costen, of El Paso), Clarissa E. (birth occurred on the 31st of August, 1844, and her marriage took place in 1861; she and her husband had two children, William P. and Barbara), Nancy C. (was born March 31, 1847, and in 1862 she was married to Joseph Grissard; she died in September, [p.260] 1869), William T. (the next in order of birth, was born August 17, 1849, and died in infancy), Josiah W. (was born June 21, 1851, and died five years later), Mary K. (was born December 31, 1853, and died in December, 1856), Rebecca T. (was born April 18, 1856, was married to Rufus Blake in 1872, and became the mother of eight children, four of whom are living). Prior to leaving Tennessee, Mr. Warren purchased three slaves, paying $600 and $800 apiece for two women, and $1,000 for a man, but on coming to Arkansas in 1856, his slaves had increased to six. He located on a quarter section of land which had been deeded to him by his father, and subsequently added, by purchase, three other quarter sections of land, and at the opening of the Rebellion was the owner of large landed estates, and had fourteen slaves. At the time of his location in Arkansas the country was in a very wild and unsettled condition, but, with the energy which has ever characterized the early pioneers, he set to work and soon had a good double log-cabin erected on his land, also negro cabins and a horse cotton-gin, the latter being the first erected within a radius of twenty miles. After a few years he put up a steam cottongin and grist-mill, at a cost of about $3,500, and hauled his machinery from Des Arc, a distance of thirty-five miles. In 1867, he, in partnership with his son Caleb P., engaged in the mercantile business in El Paso, and the latter is now one of the wealthiest merchants of the State. Mr. and Mrs. Warren are now seventy-five and seventy-four years old, respectively, and the latter has been a member of the Missionary Baptist Church for nearly seventy years. Mr. Warren has belonged to the same church for about forty years, all their children being members of the same, and those who are deceased died in full communion with the church, and with the hope and belief of immortality. Mrs. Warren is an active member of the Ladies' Aid Society, and she and her husband are ever ready with open purse to aid the needy and afflicted, and when their Master calls will be found ready and waiting to pass "over the river." The paternal ancestors of Mr. Warren came to the United States prior to the Revolutionary War, and took sides with the Colonists in that struggle. Of his maternal ancestors he has no knowledge.

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Col. Thomas Watkins, known as a prominent early settler of White County, is a Virginian by birth, and a son of Joel and Fannie (White) Watkins, whose birthplace is found in the Old Dominion. Mr. Joel Watkins was born March 4, 1784, and was married in Virginia, removing in 1830 to Tennessee. He served in the War of 1812, was a justic of the peace in Tennessee for several years, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, as was also his wife. He died in 1863. He was a son of Thomas Watkins, of English descent, and an old time Virginian, who was an officer in the Revolutionary War; the latter was with Gen. Washington at the surrender at Yorktown, and represented his county in the State legislature a number of times. Fannie White, the mother of our subject, was a daughter of Thomas White, also originally from Virginia, and a captain of a company in the American troops during the Revolutionary War. To Mr. and Mrs. Watkins nine children were born, three of whom are still living: Thomas, Catharine (wife of William H. Watts) and Fannie (now Mrs. Crossett). Thomas Watkins first saw the light of day in Halifax County, Va., in January, 1820. When fourteen years of age he went to Lebanon, Tenn., where he was employed as clerk in a store, remaining there until twenty-two years old, at which time he bought a farm in DeSoto County, Miss. In 1853, coming to Arkansas, he located in White County, on the farm which he still occupies, consisting of 218 acres, with 150 acres under cultivation. In 1838 he was married to Miss Moore, of Tennessee, who died in 1843, leaving three daughters, all deceased. In 1848 Miss Amanda Dowdle, a native of South Carolina became his wife, surviving until her death, in 1854; she bore two children: William M. (a merchant of Searcy) and Allen D. (a farmer of White County). Mr. Watkins' third wife was formerly Mary Walker, to whom he was united in 1856. A native of White County, she was a daughter of James Walker, and departed this life in 1857, leaving one daughter, who died when an infant. In 1863 Mr. Watkins married his fourth and present companion, [p.261] Mrs. Margaret E. Stone (nee Core), a widow, whose birth occurred in Haywood County, Tenn., July 25, 1834. They are the parents of two children, living, and two now deceased. Those surviving are: Mary Kate and Maggie C., both at home. Mr. Watkins is a member of the Masonic order, in which he has taken the Royal Arch degree, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as does his wife. He is an nterprising and highly respected man, enjoying universal esteem.

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Hon. T. W. Wells, Searcy, Ark. Every community is bound to have among her citizens a few men of recognized influence and ability, who, by their systematic and careful, thorough manner of work, attain to success which is justly deserved. Among this class is Mr. Wells, a man esteemed as a prominent and substantial, as well as one of the pioneer citizens of the county. He was born in Haywood County, Tenn., May 18, 1834, and was the second of eight children, the result of the union of William Stokes and Penelope (Standley) Wells, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively, who were married February 15, 1832. When a boy William S. Wells occupied the claim where Brownsville is now located, and later traded it for a suit of clothes. He was married in Tennessee, and followed farming all his life near the city of Brownsville, Tenn. His death occurred July 20, 1867 (he was born August 2, 1807), and his wife previous to this, on April 9, 1866. Her birth was February 28, 1811. The grandfather, John Wells, was a native of Kentucky, and a pioneer of that State in the time of Daniel Boone. Grandfather William Standley was a native of Tennessee, and anong the pioneers of that State. T. W. Wells was reared to farm life, and educated in the district schools of Tennessee, although the main part of his education was obtained by personal application. He left home at eighteen years of age without money, attended school at Cageville, Tenn., worked his way through by labor, but was under the tutelage of Prof. William A. Allen. After leaving college Mr. Wells engaged in teaching, and followed this profession from 1852 to 1854. On October 25 of the last-mentioned year he was united in marriage to Miss Jeannette Edwards, a native of Tennessee, and the daughter of William and Lavinia Edwards, natives of Edgecombe County, N. C. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards settled in Tennessee in an early day, or in 1835, and here both died the same year. After marriage Mr. Wells settled in Tennessee, and was engaged in teaching and farming on the shares. During 1857 and 1858 he was engaged in the book business, but in the last-named year he moved to Avoyelles Parish, La., where he was occupied in overseeing. In May of 1859, he moved back to Tennessee, followed teaching for three months, and in the fall of that year came to Arkansas, landing at Des Arc with 15 cents and a sick wife. From there he went to El Paso, White County, Ark., and taught school for about ten months, when he and wife regained their health. After this Mr. Wells engaged in the mill business at El Paso, and in partnership with James M. Wright erected the first steam mill in that place, being connected with it until 1861, when Mr. Wells was left to conduct it alone. In 1862 he engaged in milling in Van Buren County, and in July of the following year he purchased the McCauley mill, at Prospect Bluff, and had the only fine flouring mill in White County. This he continued until 1867, when he moved to Clay Township, White County, and bought a timber tract of eighty acres. This he opened up, and has now 360 acres, with 165 under cultivation. He owns a good steam-mill and gin. He moved to Searcy in 1868, but still continued the milling and farming business. He lost his wife in 1875, and his second marriage was in 1877, December 5, in Woodruff County, to Mrs. Delilah J. Bosley, a native of Tennessee. Three children were the fruits of this union, only one now living, Thomas W., who was born on January 1, 1886. The other two were named Thomas Clarence and Felix Grundy (both of whom died with measles, April 25, 1885, at the age of two and five years, respectively). Mr. Wells takes a prominent part in politics, and is a stanch Democrat. He represented White County in the legialature in 1874, and was re-elected two years later, serving until 1878. In 1882 he represented the Twenty-seventh senatorial district, composed [p.262] of White and Faulkner Counties, and served until 1884. He is in very comfortable circumstances, and this is all the fruits of his own exertion. He is one of the honored pioneers of White County, and during the many years he has resided here, he has not only become well known, but the respect and esteem shown him is as wide as his acquaintance.

Dr. M. C. Wells, has been for years successfully engaged in the practice of medicine, but also pursues the occupation of farming. He was born in Haywood County, Tenn., in 1848, and was the youngest in a family of eight children born to W. S. and Penelope (Standley) Wells, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Tennessee. The father was a farmer by occupation, and after settling in Tennessee, which was at an early day, he opened up a farm on which he died in 1868, his wife having died a year earlier. Dr. M. C. Wells was reared to a farm life and was educated in the schools of Haywood County, in that county also receiving his first medical knowledge. In 1869-70, and the winter of 1870-71, he attended lectures in the Washington University of Baltimore, Md. (now known as the College of Physicians and Surgeons), and ater took an intermediate course at Louisville, Ky. He first settled in White County, in the year 1871, and began his practice in Des Arc Township, but since November of the same year he has been a resident of Marion Township. During his medical career of nineteen years he has won the reputation, and deservedly, of being a skillful physician, and his practice lies among the best people of the county. He keeps his own medicines and is ready to answer calls at any time. He is giving his attention to farming also, and owns a good farm of 150 acres on Big Creek Township, of which seventy are under cultivation, and all is well adapted to the raising of stock. Dr. Wells owns a handsome home in Searcy, his residence being situated near Galloway College, in a very pleasant part of the town. He has always been public spirited, and in his political preferences is a Democrat, and as he has always taken a deep interest in school matters he has served a number of years as a member of the school board. He was married in 1872 to Miss Mary Cheney Knowlton, a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of Hon. H. C. and Mary Agnes (Stone) Knowlton, the former born in Vermont and the latter in Tennessee. In 1870 they settled in White County, Ark., and here are now residing. The Doctor and his wife are the parents of four children: Beulah S., William H., Grace Garland and Lois Lina.

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George G. Wells is in every respect worthy of being classed among the successful farmers of White County, for by his own industry and good management he has become the owner of 160 acres of land, sixty of which he now has under cultivation. He assisted in tilling his father's farm in Haywood County, Tenn., there also receiving his education, and when Civil War broke out, he joined Company G, Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry (being regimental flag bearer for that regiment for two years), under Gen. Forrest, and was at the battles of Fort Pillow, Harrisburg, Yazoo City, Corinth, Pulaski, Columbus, Mount Pleasant, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville and others. He was taken prisoner at Columbus and Nashville, but both times was soon retaken. He surrendered at Jonesboro, N. C., in June, 1865, and returned to his home in Tennessee, where he resumed farming. He was married in his native State in November, 1867, to Callie B. Hooks, of Kentucky, a daughter of Henry Clinton and Rebecca (Somersault) Hooks, also Kentuckians, who moved to Tennessee at an early day. The father died in April, 1865, and the mother in 1885. Mr. Wells and his wife continued to reside in Tennessee until 1872, when they sold their farm and came to White County, purchasing, in 1880, their present farm. They now have sixty-five acres under cultivation. They first bought an improved farm of 100 acres near El Paso, paying $12 per acre, but owing to defective title, they afterward lost it, and were compelled to commence anew, but owing to their frugal habits and shrewd management, they are now in good circumstances. Mr. Wells is a believer in temperance, is a Democrat, and he and wife are believers in the Christian religion. He has three children by his first wife, who died in April, 1883. Mr. Wells subsequently married M. V. Choat, [p.263] widow of Stephen Choat. By her first husband she has two children: Lee and Willie. Mr. Wells is a brother of Dr. M. C. Wells, whose biography appears elsewhere in this work.

William C. West is justly conceded to be among White County's most extensive merchants, and his career as such is one which redounds to his own personal credit. A native of Alabama, he is a son of William and Mary (Howard) West, natives of North Carolina, who moved to Alabama shortly after their marriage, and in 1837 to Marshall County, Miss. After the death of his wife, in 1844, Mr. West went to Arkansas and located in White County, where his death occurred, in 1859, at the age of eighty-four years. He was a Baptist minister, in which work he had been engaged for forty years. He was the father of eleven children, two of whom only are living: R. R. West (who is a chancery clerk in De Soto County) and William C. (our subject). The latter was born in Perry County, Ala., March 14, 1828. At the age of nineteen he was employed as a clerk in a store; but, on coming to White County, started into the mercantile business for himself on a small scale, a short time after, however, entering the employ of a firm in West Point. In 1858 he resumed general merchandising, with a capital of $400 or $500. Just before the Missouri campaign he enlisted in the Confederate army and served as adjutant for Gen. Mitchell, remaining in service throughout the Missouriraid. During the war he lost all of his property, and had to start from the beginning after returning home; but by hard work, energy and perseverance he has built up an extensive patronage, and his yearly sales will now average $25,000. He also owns 1,200 acres of land, with 300 acres cleared, and a good portion under cultivation. May 27, 1856, Mr. West was married to Miss Frances Adams, a daughter of Hardin S. Adams, of Mississippi. She died in 1886, leaving four children: Charles E. (who is in business with his father), Lavenia H., Fannie H. and Mary E. Mr. West is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, as was also his wife. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Masonic order. He was postmaster of this place in 1877-78.

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Judge N. H. West, Searcy, Ark. This much-esteemed and representative man of the county was elected to his present responsible position in September, 1888, and has effectively conducted the affairs of the same since. He was originally from Madison County, Tenn., where his birth occurred in 1836, and was the oldest in a family of five children born to the union of Philip T. and Hurelia (Harris) West, natives of Tennessee. The father was a farmer, a local minister, and in November, 1851, he moved to White County, locating in Marion Township, where he entered land. He died there in 1853, and his excellent wife survived him until 1886. Their family consisted of these children: N. H., H. T. (married and resides in White County), Thomas N. (died in 1870), Mary A. (was the wife of R. G. Thomas, died in the county in 1888) and Martha J. (was born in White County; married W. A. Patterson and resides in Marion Township). Judge N. H. West came to White County when fifteen years of age, was early taught the duties on the farm, and received his education by his own exertions and by the aid of the pine knot, by the light of which he spent many hours poring over the pages of his books. He stood between the handles of the plow at the age of seven years, and has continued agricultural pursuits ever since. He learned the blacksmith trade and followed that pursuit for some years, but later purchased a timber tract of eighty acres, which he has since added to until he now has 191 acres, with 125 acres under cultivation. He is pleasantly situated two miles from Searcy. During the Civil War he enlisted under Capt. Critz's Company, Eighth Arkansas Infantry, Tennessee Army, and was in the battles of Corinth, Chattanooga, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and participated also in Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. He was paroled at Atlanta, Ga., on May 6, 1865, and returned to White County where he engaged in farming. He is active in politics, was justice of the peace for some time, and votes with the Union Labor party. He is a member of the Agricultural Wheel No. 145, and was president of the County Wheel at the time he was elected to his present office. He is a member of the Mount Pisgah Lodge No. 242, A. F. & [p.264] A. M., and was secretary of the same for about eight years. Mr. West was married in White County in 1856 to Miss Martha J. Stayton, a native of Georgia, and the fruits of this union were two children: William F. (married and resides in Clay Township, White County) and Nancy Jane (now Mrs. Mayo, resides in Marion Township). The mother of these children died in 1868. Judge West selected his second wife in the person of Miss Ellen Robinson, a native of Pope County, Ill., and was married to her in 1870. She was left an orphan at the age of two years, and she came to Arkansas with an uncle in 1853, where she grew to womanhood. By that union nine children were born, six now living: Harriet E., James T., David N., Henry Clay (died in 1887), Sarah Malvina, Lillie (died in 1888, at the age of six years), Viola, Martha Ellen (died at the age of two years) and Anna Elizabeth. Judge West has seen a great many changes in the country since his residence here. Searcy was then a small hamlet, there were no railroad facilities, and game was plentiful. He has been active in everything pertaining to the good of the county, and is one of the foremost men of the same.

A. J. West is one of the most successful of White County's farmers and stockmen, and deserves much credit for the way in which he has battled with fate and conquered, for he not only possesses large landed estates, but is extensively engaged in stock raising. He is now the owner of 2,462 acres of some of the best land in the county, 600 acres in cultivation, and his residence in West Point is surpassed by none. He was born in Mississippi in 1850, being the youngest of seven children of Adam and Mary (Jarvis) West, both Tennesseeans. The former was a son of John West. He was educated in Cannon County, Tenn., and when a young man moved to Alabama, near Tuscaloosa, where he followed farming. After his marriage, in 1833, he moved to Mississippi and settled on a farm, being the owner of a one-half section of land. His wife was one of a large family of children born to Levi Jarvis. Adam West served with distinction in the Mexican War. He and his wife were both members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and were honored and respected wherever they made their home. They both died on the old plantation in Mississippi. Their son, William, was for many years a prosperous and influential citizen of Memphis, where he acquired considerable property, and was beloved by all. He was a Mason, belonging to St. Elmo Commandery. He died in 1885. Emily, a daughter was married to Thomas Bice. Rachel married W. C. Wooten: they are both deceased, also Caroline, who died in 1867. Mary married Patrick Smith, and in 1887 she and her son moved to White County, Ark., with A. J. West, where they now reside. A. J. spent his early life on the plantation in Mississippi, and received his schooling at Oxford University, and afterward at Murfreesboro, Tenn. After leaving college he farmed and taught school; his father and brother-in-law being dead, he devoted the best years of his life in caring for his widowed mother and sisters and their families. He was married January 15, 1888, to Miss Jessie Bramlitt, of Corinth, Miss., who was a daughter of Jessie. L. and Mary (Anderson) Bramlitt. Her father was for many years a successful merchant of Jackson, Miss. He moved from there to Prentiss County, Miss., and purchased one of the most desirable farms in the county. Her mother was the only daughter of Samuel Anderson, of Pulaski, Tenn.

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Samuel A. Westbrook, of Beebe, White County, Ark., was born in Maury County, Tenn., April 29, 1833. Being left a poor boy, after arriving at the age of eighteen, he followed overseeing for several years, and came to Arkansas in December, 1858, where he engaged in the mill business and farming. The former he has discontinued, and now gives his attention to farming and stock raising. He has become noted for the fine stock he raises, and especially for his Short-born cattle and Clydes-dale and Morgan horses. In addition to his land being well adapted to stock raising, it is exceedingly fertile, and all kinds of fruit and grain can be raised in abundance. Mr. Westbrook is one of the pushing men of the county, and from his mill lumber was procured with which to build nearly every church and school-house in the county. He served three months in the army, but as he was [p.265] exempt, and on account of his services being required at home to operate his mill, he returned to Arkansas. He was a Whig in former times, but is now Independent in his political views. On March 30, 1865, he was married to Miss Susan A. Walker, a daughter of Rev. C. B. Walker, of Mississippi, who removed to Arkansas in 1857. Of eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Westbrook five are living: Charles B., S. A. and W. H. (twins), Jennie, Robert T., Willie and Walker Lipsey.

Daniel W. Wheaton, son of James and Betsey A. Wheaton, was born in Pomfret, Conn., October 3, 1833, on the old Wheaton homestead, which had been in the family since the Revolutionary War, being the youngest of a family of thirteen children. His father, James Wheaton, a native of Connecticut, was born in 1790, and his mother, Betsey (Angell) Wheaton, was born in Rhode Island, in 1795. They were married about 1815, and the following are the names of their children: Marshal (who died in Rhode Island, in 1840, at the age of twenty-four years), Mason N., Angell, Seth T., Gurdon N., Monroe, Nancy L., Horatio, Henry W. and D. W. James Wheaton was a farmer all his life, and died on his old homestead in Connecticut, in 1876. He was twice married, his first wife dying in 1814, left him with two children: Warren L. and Jessie C. His second wife, the mother of our subject, died in 1857, on the old farm in Connecticut. James Wheaton, the grandfather, reared a family of five children. D. W. Wheaton, our biographical subject, remained on the home farm in his native State until he was twenty-five years of age, then came West and spent twelve years in the State of Illinois, Du Page County, and was there married to Priscilla P. Beith, a daughter of William and Mary (Allen) Beith, her birth having occurred in Illinois. Her parents were Scotch and settled in Illinois about 1844, where they became the parents of three children. Mr. Wheaton and his wife have become the parents of four children: Mary E. (wife of A. P. Moody), Julia, Clara and William. Since the year 1871, Mr. Wheaton has resided in White County, Ark., his farm, comprising 275 acres, being situated one and one-half miles from Judsonia. At the time of his purchase, the land was heavily covered with timber, but he has cleared about seventy-five acres and devoted it to the raising of fruit, for which he finds a ready sale. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he being one of its stewards, and in his political views he is a Republican. He has two brothers who are large land holders at Wheaton, Ill., the town taking its name from them.

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James K. Whitney has risen to a position as one of White County's leading citizens through his own merits. A native of Tennessee, he received his education in this county, and graduated from the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College, after which he went into the mercantile business in company with C. P. Douthar, at West Point, there remaining until 1874. He then wound up his father's business, and engaged in farming and stock raising, and in 1884 commenced the breeding of Holstein cattle, the only herd of which breed he now has in White County. Mr. Whitney was born in Fayette County, Tenn., January 27, 1846, being a son of Elijah and Mary (Anderson) Whitney, of Kentucky and Tennessee nativity, respectively. Mr. Whitney, Sr., learned the machinist's trade when a young man, and was engaged for a number of years in selling cotton-spinning machinery, through Kentucky and Tennessee. After his marriage, February 22, 1842, he removed to Fayette County, Tenn., and carried on farming, in 1859 removing to Arkansas, and locating in White County, where he lived until his death, in January, 1878. He was a son of Hiram Whitney, a soldier in the War of 1812, and was with Gen. Hull on his disastrous campaign. His wife was a niece of Gen. William H. Harrison. The Whitney family are of English descent, and the Anderson family of Scotch origin. Mr. and Mrs. Whitney had a family of five children, two of whom only are living: a daughter (now Mrs. Douthar, whose husband is a merchant of White County) and James . (our subject). In 1876 James K. Whitney was married to Miss Ella T. Black, daughter of W. D. Black. She was born in White County in 1858, and has borne six children, four of whom are still living: Leslie E., [p.266] Floyd W., Bessie and Mary E. Mr. and Mrs. Whitney are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, in which the former is clerk and treasurer. He is one of the leading Democrats of the county, and as a citizen and neighbor enjoys wide respect.

L. J. Whitsitt is also numbered among the well-to-do farmers of Dogwood Township. He was born in Alabama in 1848, as the son of Wilson and Elizabeth (Price) Whitsitt, Kentuckians by birth. Wilson Whitsitt was born in 1808, and moved to Alabama when a boy with his father, being married in 1828 to the mother of our subject. Her birth occurred in 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Whitsitt were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are still living: Jane, Camily, Sallie, Harriett, I. J. (our subject), Katie and William. The father was a prosperous farmer and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as was also his wife. He died in 1878, having survived his worthy companion eight years. I. J. Whitsitt passed his school days in Alabama, and commenced his occupation of a farmer in that State in 1864. In 1873 he chose for his life associate, Elizabeth Sherwood, a daughter of Thomas and Ruth (Jinkins) Sherwood, natives of Tennessee. They haves family of two children: Benjamin and Hughes. In 1876 Mr. Whitsitt moved to Texas with his family, and was engaged in farming until 1881, then coming to White County, Ark., where he bought his present farm, consisting of 160 acres of land, with fifty acres under cultivation at the present time. He is a stanch Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, as is his wife. Mr. Whitsitt is indeed a good citizen of White County, taking an interest in all work for the benefit of the community in which he lives.

William M. Williams, a native of Randolph County, N. C., and a son of John and Ellen (Craven) Williams, also originally from the old North State, was born in 1842. John Williams was a son of James and Frances Williams, and was married between 1825 and 1830, rearing a family of seven children: Evaline, Sanliman, Robert, Susan, William M., Alexander and John. Mr. Williams died in 1846. William M. started in life for himself, in 1868, at farming, and, in 1871, came to Arkansas, settling on a farm in White County, which he rented. A short time afterward he bought 320 acres of land, and now has eighty acres under cultivation. During the war he enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Forty-sixth North Carolina Infantry, and was engaged in the battles of Seven Pines, Oak Grove, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg and the battle of Plank Road and others, serving until the close of the war, and being present when Lee surrendered under the famous old apple tree at Appomattox. Mr. Williams was married in 1872 to Miss Frances Tote, a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Tees) Tote, natives of North Carolina. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Williams says the soil of Arkansas will raise anything that can be grown elsewhere. He has been very prosperous in the nineteen years of his residence here and counts his friends by the score.

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Dr. F. M. Winborn, one of the most prominent physicians of White County, is a native of Alabama, and was born in Florence, February 27, 1835, being one of nine children in the family of William and Mary (May) Winborn. The former's birth occurred in North Carolina, July 5, 1800. He was educated in the schools of Alabama, and immigrated from the latter State in 1816 to Tennessee, whence, after a residence of two years in Tennessee, he returned to Alabama and was married, there passing the rest of his life. His wife, Mary May, was a daughter of John and Elizabeth May, of Alabama. Mr. Winborn's demise occurred in December, 1875, his wife having been called to her final home some years before. The grandfather, William Winborn, was of North Carolina nativity and a soldier in the War of the Revolution. He died in Alabama in 1832. The maternal grandfather, John May, was originally from Georgia, and served in the War of 1812. His death occurred in 1854. His father was born in England, his mother being a native of Ireland. F. M. Winborn was educated at the Diasburg Academy, Tennessee, and received his medical education at the University of Mississippi, graduating with honors from that institution. He was married in November, 1858, to Miss Amorett [p.267] Doyle, a daughter of Sarah and David Doyle. Dr. and Mrs. Winborn are the parents of nine children, four boys and five girls: William G., Robert L., Lemuel H., John B., Ida, Edgar V., Dock, Louella and Olla A. Dr. Winborn moved from Mississippi to Arkansas in 1878, and settled in Lonoke, where he practiced his profession successfully for three years. Thinking, however, that White County offered better inducements as a place of residence he came here, and has established an enviable reputation as a careful, able practitioner. He is almost constantly at the bedside of the sick, and is invariably given the most hearty welcome, for his coming means the alleviation of their suffering. But though his attention is so taken up in the pursuance of his chosen profession, he aids and supports all enterprises of a worthy character. He is a member of the Masonic order, and has held the office of magistrate for two years. He served in the late war, and enlisted in 1861 under Gen. Polk, Preston Smith's Brigade, Forty-seventh Tennessee Regiment, being wounded at the battle of Shiloh by a ball passing through the calf of his left leg. The Doctor also held the office of first lieutenant in the Kentucky campaign, a position which he filled with honor. The company was known as the Miller Guards of Richmond, Ky.

 

Robert J. Winn is a Buckeye by birth, and during the period of the Civil War served in the Federal army, enlisting in the Second Ohio Infantry, August 16, 1861. He was in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Mill Creek Gap, Buzzard's Roost, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta and a number of others, and was captured at Pulaski, Tenn., May 30, 1862, by Morgan, but was exchanged and received his discharge, October 11, 1864. March 7, 1866, Miss Alma Wymer became his wife, a daughter of John and Rebecca (Gormer) Wymer, originally from Pennsylvania. Robert J. Winn was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in 1837, and was a son of Adolphus and Rebecca (Jordon) Winn. Adolphus Winn was a Virginian by birth, his existence dating from 1810, and he was one of a family of twelve children born to William and Rebecca (Russel) Winn, also of the Old Dominion. He was married in 1836 and moved to Ohio, where he bought a farm of 500 acres, there residing until his death in 1885. Mrs. Winn, the mother of Robert J., was a daughter of Cabot and Rachel Jordon, natives of Maryland, and who went to Ohio in 1825, where Rebecca was born. Her parents lived to an advanced age, her father dying when seventy-six years old, and her mother at the age of seventy-eight. Mr. and Mrs. Adolphus Winn were the parents of thirteen children: Robert J., Martha R., Nancy J. (deceased), Caleb J. (deceased), Elizabeth and Margaret (twins), Fennan S., John A., Albert J., Mariah, Hattie, Harmon S. and Simeon S. Mrs. Winn is still living. To the subject of this sketch, and wife, six children have been given: Lillie C., Herbert H., Edith R., Louis A., Mable O. and Clarence A. Mr. Winn moved to this State in 1875 and settled in Judsonia, White County, where he bought a farm of eighty acres, and is engaged principally in raising fruit and vegetables for market. He also owns considerable town property and an interest in the Judsonia Canning Company, of which he is president, being also president of the board of trustees of the

Judsonia University, and is a member of the board of trustees of the Building Association. Besides he is secretary of the Arkansas Fruit Growers' and Shippers' Union. Mr. Winn is a member of Judsonia Lodge No. 54, I. O. O. F., and of the Grand Lodge of the State. He and his wife and eldest daughter belong to the Baptist Church, and take an active part in all religious work. The former has been engaged in teaching school for a number of years.

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John W. Womack is the son of Jacob and Nancy (Bates) Womack, and was born in Meigs County, Tenn., February 16, 1833. Jacob Womack was a Virginian by birth, his natal day being in 1797. His youth was passed in the Old Dominion and in 1822 he was united in marriage with Miss Bates, also a native of Virginia. One year after this event Mr. Womack moved to East Tennessee and died there in 1863, his wife surviving until 1865. He was a successful farmer and a quiet, law-abiding citizen. In his political views he sided with the Democrats, and was a Primitive [p.268] Baptist in his religious belief. Mr. and Mrs. Womack became the parents of eight children, three of whom are now living: John W., Martha J. (Mrs. J. N. Brown, of East Tennessee), and Elizabeth (widow of James Masner, of Independence County, Ark.). Those deceased are: David, Sarah (Mrs. Heard), Daniel, Mary A. (Mrs. W. C. Grubbs) and Susana (wife of Thomas Bonner). John W. Womack was reared in Meigs County, Tenn., and received such advantages for an education as the schools of the period afforded. Remaining on the farm with his parents until thirty years of age, at the expiration of that time he branched out for himself, engaging in farming and stock raising, which is his present occupation. In 1867 he removed to Arkansas and settled on his farm where he now resides. The farm consists of 240 acres of valuable land, highly cultivated and his stock is of various kinds, all of the finest breeds. Mr. Womack was married in 1867, in Meigs County, Tenn., to Miss Ellen B., daughter of Uriah and Mary Denton, of Virginia, and to them a family of five children have been born, four living: Daniel U., Mary A., John and Sabinus. Mr. Womack served in the Confederate army, in Col. McKenzie's Third East Tennessee Cavalry during the war, and was mostly on scout duty in various skirmishes and fights, but in no regular battles of any prominence. He was captured while ill, in 1865, being released just before the final surrender. Mr. Womack is an influential member of the school board, a stanch Democrat in politics, and has been a Master Mason for over twenty years.

 

Alfonsus A. Wood might well be called a self-made man. His father, Joseph P. Wood, a native of Weakley County, Tenn., was a farmer by profession, and very successful in that calling. He was united in marriage, in 1836, in Weakley County, Tenn., to Mary E. Freeman, of Virginia. In 1870 they moved to Arkansas, and settled in Jackson County, where Mr. Wood was residing at the date of his death, in 1872, though he was in Tennessee when he died, having been called there on business. His belief was with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. and Mrs. Wood were the parents of eleven children, five of whom are now living: Fannie (wife of T. M. Thompkins, of Carroll County, Tenn.), Mary F. (Mrs. W. B. Gamble, of White County, Ark.), Emma B. (Mrs. H. S. McKnight, residing in White County, Ark.), Alfonsus A. and Portia S. (wife of B. F. Whitley). Mrs. Wood makes her home at this time with her son in White County, and notwithstanding that she has reached the age of three-score years and ten, is still active in all church and charity work, and a liberal contributor to these enterprises. Alfonsus A. began for himself at the age of eighteen, choosing his father's occupation, which he has successfully conducted ever since. He owns eighty acres of excellent land in White County, and a half interest in a large steam grist-mill and cottongin, at Russell, Ark., where he is now residing. Mr. Wood was married in White County, on December 16, 1875, to Miss Lucinda F. Plant, a daughter of William and Emily Plant, old settlers of White County. By this marriage one child was born, who died in infancy. Mrs. Wood died November 18, 1876, and in 1881 Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Margaret L. Drenan, whose parents, A. R. and Mary Drenan, natives of Tennessee, are now residing in Russell. Mrs. Wood died in February, 1884, leaving two children: Tennie and Alvis A. Mr. Wood is a Democrat in his political views, though not an enthusiast. He is an earnest worker and a member of many years' standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church, also belonging to the Triple Alliance, a secret mutual benefit association. He is a man of quiet habits, charitable, and very popular in the society of his little town, being respected by all.

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Daniel T. Woodson was the eldest son of James M. and Pauline L. (Gregory) Woodson; the former was a native of Virginia and went to Western Tennessee in 1845, removing in 1858 to Arkansas, and settling in White County. Daniel T. Woodson first saw the light in Virginia, on October 19, 1839. He accompanied his parents to Arkansas at the age of nineteen, where he was married at the age of twenty-one years to a Miss Park, of Tennessee nativity, and who came to White County four years previous to the Woodsons. Daniel T. enlisted [p.269] during the war, in May, 1862, in the Confederate army, first in the cavalry and afterward in the infantry service, being a member of a foraging force throughout the war. Foraging was a dangerous occupation at that time, and he had many narrow escapes from capture. After the cessation of hostilities Mr. Woodson bought a place of 160 acres in White County, on which he resided until 1877, when he sold his farm and purchased another of 211 acres in the same township, near Centre Hill. In 1882 he bought a mill and cotton-gin, in which business he has been very successful. Mr. Woodson's wife died in 1870, leaving two sons, James M. and Joseph Y. He was married the second time in November of that year to N. L. Dollar, by which marriage five children have been born: Phillip C., Mary L., Bula L., Zula B. and Bertha D. Mr. Woodson is a member of the Masonic order, to which he has belonged since 1862; his membership is now in Centre Hill Lodge No. 114, where he has held an office for the last fifteen years. He is a decided Democrat, politically, and held the office of justice of the peace in his township in 1887-88. Mr. and Mrs. Woodson belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, of which they have been members nearly all their lives. In the organization where they worship, Mr. Woodson is leader in the choir and also superintendent in the Sunday-school.

 

James R. Woodson. There is generally more or less similarity in the sketches of those who have for the most part been engaged in agricultural pursuits from boyhood, but Mr. Woodson's career has been sufficiently diversified as to render him well posted with different affairs, people, etc. The State of his nativity is West Virginia, where he was born in 1841, being the second of a family of ten children born to James M. and Paulina (Gregory) Woodson, both of whm were Virginians, the former's birth occurring in 1813. They were married in 1838, and their union resulted in the birth of the following children: Daniel T., James R., Elizah, John L., William J., Martha J., George W. D., Clements and Bettie. James R. Woodson removed to Tennessee with his father in 1843, and after residing there twelve years came with him to White County, Ark., but the latter's death occurred in Memphis, Tenn., in 1862. James R. Woodson gave his attention to farm work until the outbreak of the war, then enlisted in Company A, Seventh Battalion, under Col. D. Shay, and took part in the following engagements: Perryville, Dalton, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville (Tenn.) and Atlanta, and in the last-named engagement received a gunshot wound in the thigh, and thirty-six bullet holes in his clothes. At the time of the surrender he was filling the position of teamster. He came to Arkansas, and in 1866 was married to Amanda Goad, a daughter of Henry and Mary (Sowell) Goad, natives of Tennessee. He now owns a farm of 120 acres, and has fifty acres under cultivation, all his property being acquired by hard and persistent labor. The children of this marriage are: Mary L. (the wife of Monroe Henderson and the mother of one child, Julia E), Docia A. (the wife of William Elded and the mother of one child, Martha J.), Emma G. (was married to Thomas Baker, by whom she has one child, Elmer J.), Martha F., James H., Alice M., William E., George E., Lula E., John S. and Joel F. Mrs. Woodson died February 2, 1889, her infant son, Aaron, also dying. Mr. and Mrs. Woodson held memberships in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he has always been an active worker for schools as well as churches. He is a member of Mount Pisgah Lodge No. 242 of the A. F. & A. M., and has been an officer of the same.

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James Maury Wright ranks among the most prosperous of White County's agriculturists, and enjoys the reputation of being not only a substantial and progressive farmer, but an intelligent and thoroughly posted man on all public affairs. He first saw the light of day August 12, 1834, in Madison County, Tenn., and through his paternal ancestor, James Wright, has inherited Irish blood, his grandfather having come from Ireland to America about the year 1780, and took up his abode in Franklin County, N. C., where he engaged in farming and died at an advanced age. James Wright was married in North Carolina in the year 1818 to Miss Patsey Stigall, and after they had become the parents of five children they [p.270] removed to Gibson County, Tenn., where their family was increased to eleven children. James Maury Wright was born in the latter State, and was the tenth of the family in order of birth. His early education was confined to the subscription schools, and he was reared to the duties of farm life on his father's plantation. September 11, 1856, his nuptials with Miss Martha R. Vann were celebrated, she being also a native of Tennessee. Their children were as follows: Elizsbeth (born June 14, 1857, was married to William G. Ross in 1878, and has five children), Mary (born in January, 1858, died February of the same year), Martha (born May 15, 1859, was married to Thomas Burns in 1878, and bore one child. Both she and her husband are now dead, the former dying in 1884, and the latter in 1879), James Henry (was born on January 31, 1860), William N. (born Janury 31, 1863, and is now a salesman in the mercantile house of Messrs. Warren & Phelps of El Paso, Ark.), Charles T. (born May 19, 1867), John R. (born August 27, 1869), Nettie (born in July, 1871), and Hattie (born in June, 1874). The mother of these children died in July, 1880, an earnest member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and two years later Mr. Wright wedded Miss Minerva Hendricks. In 1857 the family came to Arkansas, and Mr Wright began to make improvaments on a tract of railroad land, but one year later moved to El Paso, where he began working at the carpenter's trade having served an apprenticeship under his father, but also continued his farming operations on a tract of land containing forty acres adjoining the town. In 1860, in company with T. W. Wells, now of Searcy, he erected the first grist-mill in the vicinity of El Paso, a need which had been long felt by the people of the community. Peach Orchard (now El Paso) at time of Mr. Wright's location only consisted of a double log-house, but in the fall of 1859 and the winter of 1860, there were three business houses erected. Wild game was plentiful in the surrounding woods, and many a deer was brought low by the unerring aim of Mr. Wright's rifle. In 1861 he sold his land and purchased two acres in the town upon which he erected a dwelling house and other buildings, occasionally working at his trade in connection with his milling operations. After purchasing a farm of 160 acres in Conway County, in 1862, he settled his family there, and June 20 of the same year he enlisted in Company A, Col. Glenn's regiment, and was on detached duty in Arkansas for about a month as teamster, and was afterward promoted to the position of wagon master, in which capacity he served until January, 1864. While at home on furlough the Federal troops got possession of the State of Arkansas, and Mr. Wright was cut off from his command, and did not again enter service. In 1864 he bought an interest in a large flouring mill, which was known as the Peach Orchard Tap Mill, but sold out two years later, and in 1869 purchased the farm where he is now residing, and since 1870 has also operated the Warren & Davis flour, grist and cotton-gin mill, following the latter occupation in El Paso from 1872 to 1886. He has been very successful and at one time owned 240 acres of land, but at the present time has in his possession 160 acres with about 100 acres under cultivation. Mr. Wright and his wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, and in his political views he is a Democrat. He belongs to El Paso Lodge No. 65 of the A. F. & A. M., and has attained the Chapter degree. He has taken an active interest in the advancement of education in his county, and was one of the few who voted for the special school tax. He has also contributed liberally to schools.