Biographical and Historical
Memoirs of Western Arkansas
Goodspeed Publishers, 1891

James J. Roberts combines both farming and merchandising as his occupation in life, and resides at Appleton, in Griffin Township, this county. In his commercial business he is building up a fair trade, and constantly increasing his stock. In his farming enterprises he owns 320 acres, of which eighty is under a good state of cultivation, and the balance well timbered, the farm is well stocked and equipped, and in his farming, as in his commercial pursuits, he is successful and thriving. He was born in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, July 7, 1850. His parents, A. and Mary Roberts, were natives of North Carolina, to which State their ancestors were among the earliest pioneers. They were the parents of eleven children, ten now living, four of whom reside in Arkansas, and the others in Texas. Mr. A. Roberts was a house carpenter, and a good mechanic at that trade. He immigrated to Arkansas in 1867, and located in Conway County, where he resided till his death, which occurred in 1882. He and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. She is still living, and makes her home with her children in Texas. Our subject was reared and educated in Alabama, came to Arkansas with his parents, and at his majority commenced life for himself as a farmer. The next year (1872) he married Elizabeth Papsian, a native of Alabama. To this union have been born six children, named Leroy, Mary (deceased), Wesley, Rhoda, Joseph and Rosalia. Religiously this family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which Mr. Roberts officiates as class-leader. Socially, he is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He is public-spirited and progressive, giving his support to schools, churches, and any enterprise designed for the public good.

George M. Rapier of the firm of Vandervort & Rapier, furniture dealers at Morrilton, was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee, February 11, 1854. He was a son of John M., and Mary M. (Gideons) Rapier. Parents were natives of Tennessee: father born in 1801, and mother in 1808. They were married in Monroe County, Tennessee, and the result of that union was twelve children, eight sons and four daughters; four children are now living. Father was reared on a farm, and took as active part in politics in his early life. He was Tax Collector in Bradley County, Tennessee, for six years, and served as Justice for a long time. Politically he was a Democrat. Mother died in 1876, a member of the Baptist Church. Father emigrated from Tennessee to Arkansas in 1880, and settled in Conway County, where he died in 1885, a member of the Baptist Church. Our subject came to Arkansas with his father in 1880, and engaged in the furniture business in Morrilton. He has since been identified with the business interest of that town, and in active business there since. On October 30, 1889, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Pateete, a member of an old family in this county, and born here herself in 1868. They are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

William Reed, of the firm of Reed & White, blacksmiths and wood- workmen, at Centre Ridge, was born in Summerville, Alabama, in 1848, and was a son of James and Elizabeth (Smith) Reed, who removed from Alabama to Tennessee when William was quite small, and in 1857 Mr. Reed removed to Van Buren County, Arkansas, and from there to Conway County, where he died, April 3, 1887; Mrs. Reed having died in Tennessee. Mr. Reed was a farmer by occupation, and served about three months in the Southern army, being with Gen. Price on his celebrated raid through Missouri. He was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and was married three times. William had five brothers and one sister, three of whom were his seniors. He was reared to follow the plow, with the advantages of nothing but the neighboring schools. His first marriage occurred in 1869, to Miss Rebecca, a daughter of Allen and Elizabeth Lacy. She was born in Tennessee, and died in 1875, leaving two children. In 1876 Mr. Reed married Miss Sutha Halbrook, a daughter of Joseph E. Halbrook (whose sketch is in another part of this work). Mrs. Reed was born in Van Buren County, and died about fifteen months after marriage. Mr. Reed married his present wife in 1878. She was Louisa, a daughter of James and Louisa Mahan, who removed from Kentucky to Conway County prior to the war. Mr. Mahan is still a resident of Conway County, but his wife died some time ago. By this union Mr. Reed had six children, of whom three survive. He continued his residence in Van Buren County till 1875, when he removed to Conway County, and farmed near Centre Ridge till about 1888, where he learned the blacksmith trade, which he has since followed, and in February, 1890, formed a partnership with William H. White, which constitutes the present firm. Mr. Reed own a farm of sixty acres near Centre Ridge, and property in town. He is Chaplain of the Centre Ridge Lodge, No. 475, A. F. and A. M., and both he and wife are consistent members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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John M. Russell, who is well known as one of the leading farmers of Union Township, owes his nativity to Greene County, East Tennessee, where he was born in 1844. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Howell) Russell, were natives of Tennessee. Mr. Russell was born in 1814, and his wife twelve or thirteen years later. They removed to Conway County in 1857, spending the first year at what is known as Mallett Town, and from 1858 to 1865 near Greenbrier in Faulkner County. They then lived near Lewisburg till 1872, when they removed to Caney Creek, and in 1882 to Cedar Creek, where Mr. Russell died in November of 1884; Mrs. Russell died in 1867; both were members of the M. E. Church, South, many years. The grandfather, Robert Russell, was probably a native of Scotland, but was a very early settler in East Tennessee, dying in Greene County of that State. He was a soldier with Gen. Jackson in one of the early wars. Grandfather John Howell was probably born in North Carolina, but died in Greene County, Tennessee, in an early day. John M. Russell is the fourth of six sons and six daughters-seven living: John M., Thomas, of Van Buren County; Sallie, widow of Robert Wood (deceased); Mary, wife of Cyrus McCullough; Margaret; Merilla, wife of P. J. Stacks; Melissa, now Mrs. James Payne. The three eldest sons, Robert, Lafayette and William (all deceased) participated in the Southern army. John M. served about ten months in Company I, of Col. Glenn's Regiment, but after the evacuation of Little Rock he left that army, and in 1863 enlisted in the Federal army in Company G, Third Arkansas Cavalry, and was captured at Arkadelphia in the spring of 1864, but was paroled after two weeks' imprisonment at Camden, and rejoined his command. In 1869 he married Nancy E., a daughter of Dennie and Sarah Stell, who were natives of Georgia, but very early settlers of this county, where Mrs. Stell died in 1874. Mr. Stell's body was found in the cypress during the war. It is supposed he was murdered. Mrs. Russell was born in Conway County, and is the mother of eight children, three living. Mr. Russell is the owner of a farm of 160 acres, with about 65 acres cleared. He and wife are Methodists.

Parson William T. Roberts. Among the pioneers of Union Township none are more worthy of mention than the subject of these memoirs. Born in North Carolina in 1842, a son of John L. and Sarah (Proby) Roberts, who were also natives of the "Old North State," where they continued to reside till about 1849, when they immigrated to Conway County and purchased a large tract of land five miles north of where Plummerville is, where they improved a good farm and took an active interest in the welfare of the neighborhood. Mr. Roberts died in the hospital at Little Rock while in the service of his country as a soldier in the Third Arkansas of Union troops. His beloved wife followed him some years after; she was of an old Quaker family, and was reared an orphan. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts were consistent members of the Methodist Church. Hugh Roberts, the grandfather, was a North Carolina farmer; he was of Trish descent, and died in North Carolina. Parson Roberts is the eldest of his father's family, and is truly a self-made man, having been reared in the pioneer days of Conway County, with such an education as the country schools of this section afforded in that day. Being of suitable age when the war broke out, to assist in that struggle for liberty he, in 1862, joined Company I of Williamson's Batalion, afterwards Third Arkansas Infantry, and still later mounted infantry, and participated in the battles of Corinth, Tupelo, Chickamauga, all through the Georgia and Atlanta campaign, and on to the sea, and finally surrendered near Raleigh, North Carolina, thus ending a brilliant military career, and left him once more to join in a peaceful domestic life. On April 21, 1866, he married Mary Bell, a daughter of Hugh and Margaret Bell, who removed from Tennessee to Van Buren County, but later to Conway County, where Mr. Bell died. Mrs. Bell is still living. Mrs. Roberts was born in Tennessee March 24, 1844, and departed this life Decembes 24, 1886, being the mother of seven children: James C., born 1867 (deceased); Hugh L., born 1869; infant (deceased); Romulus T., born 1874; Rimulus T., born 1876; Hiram G., born 1878; William T., born 1880. In 1887 Mr. Roberts married Mrs. Emma Nichols, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Coffee, who were born in South Carolina, but married in Tennessee, where Mr. Coffee died about 1884; wife died about 1878; she was a Cumberland Presbyterian. Mrs. Roberts was born in Maury County, Tennessee, where she was married the first time, and in 1869 came to Conway County where Mr. Nichols died in 1875, leaving one son, Samuel W. Nichols. Mr. Roberts spent the first few years of his married life in the Arkansas River bottoms, but since then has lived on his present farm of 160 acres, a part of the old homestead, and is one of the most valuable farms in the vicinity. From his childhood till after the war, Mr. Roberts was a devout Methodist, but during the last thirteen years he has officiated as a minister of the gospel in the Christadelphian order of faith. He was formerly a member of Howard Lodge, A. F. and A. Masons, but now of the Springfield Lodge, No. 127. His reputation for honesty and integrity is beyond question, and none are more ready to respond to calls for the public interest and the general welfare of the country. Mrs. Roberts is a Methodist.

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Charles C. Reid, a brilliant and promising young attorney of the firm of Moose & Reid, was born in Johnson County, June 15, 1868. He was the second in a family of three children born to C. C. and Sallie A. (Robinson) Reid. Mr. Reid removed with his family to Lewisburg, where he soon began the practice of law and became one of the most able attorneys of the Conway County bar. He was particularly noted for his oratorical ability. He died in the zenith of his popularity, and his death is spoken of now by former friends as having snapped the thread of a promising career. The subject of this sketch attended school at Lewisburg till the age of 13 years, when he entered the State University at Fayetteville, where he remained four years, completing his literary studies. At the commencement exercises on this occasion, he won the medal in the annual debate in a contest with J. W. Walker, a son of Senator Walker. Our subject, now only in his 17th year, entered the law department of Vanderbilt University at Nashville Tenn., remaining there two years. He graduated on his 19th birthday, June 15, 1886. He was chosen by the Faculty as one of the four to contend for the Orator's medal at the commencement exercises of that year, and for the second time, against the most able talent of the college, the high honor of excelling all was accorded to Mr. Reid, and the medal was fairly won. In all other contests in the University for oratorical honors, in which our subject engaged, he was always successful. The first year he won the declaimer's medal, and later in the same year he won the medal at the annual debate, chosen by the members of the literary society, against members of other societies. This gift of nature (of great benefit to a lawyer, and undoubtedly inherited from his father) has been so cultivated under able tutors that his ability has become more generally known than perhaps any other person of his age in the State. He was admitted to the bar the first Monday in October, 1886, by order of the Circuit Court removing his disability as a minor. He immediately formed his present business connection with Mr. Moose, and the firm of Moose & Reid, lawyers, at Morrilton, is justly noted for the legal attainments of its members, as well as their high standing as gentlemen of moral and social worth. Mr. Reid was united in marriage to Miss Emma Geraldine Crozier, a daughter of H. V. Crozier, January 30, 1890. They are both members of the M. E. Church, South, and both active workers in the Sabbath School of that church. Mr. Reid is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Hermion Lodge, No. 28.

Benjamin F. Reeves, a planter living in Higgins Township, was born in Missouri, March 4, 1837. He is a son of Benjamin and Parmelia (Scott) Reeves, who were natives of Tennessee, where they were married. They emigrated from Tennessee to Missouri, where father died in 1839; mother died in 1862. They were members of the M. E. and Christian Churches, respectively. They were the parents of two children, the subject of this sketch and Jackson, a younger brother. Mr. Reeves was married in 1859 to Miss Nancy Morse; they are the parents of thirteen children, three of whom are dead; the living are Melinda. John F., George B., Mary, Joseph, Martha A., Benjamin, Hadford, Rufus. After serving full time in the late war, in which he was wagonmaster in McFrick's brigade in the Confederate army, he surrendered in the Indian Territory in 1865, and re-engaged in farming pursuits, in which he has been constantly engaged since. He now owns a good farm of 127 acres, with eighty acres under cultivation, and the whole well improved and stocked. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, takes a lively interest in all matters of public improvement, and is, politically, a member of the Democratic party.

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Wilson C. Shewmake, one of the most thorough planters of Washington Township, owes his nativity not only to Arkansas, but to the county in which he now resides, having been born here December 13, 1840. He was the son of Jesse and Viva (Tracy) Shewmake, who were both natives of Tennessee, the father being born in that State in 1816. Jesse Shewmake left his paternal home in Tennessee when he was but 20 years of age and came to Arkansas, where he at once settled in Conway County, arriving here in 1836, the year in which the Territory of Arkansas became a State. We learn that from the date of his settlement in the pioneer period of its history, that he at once became identified with its prosperity and development. He lost his wife, who died in 1843 and left two surviving children, Preasant G. and our subject, Wilson C.; there had been another child born, but it died in infancy. Jesse married the second time, and now he and his estimable lady are members of the Methodist and Baptist Churches respectively. Jesse Shewmake held the office of Justice of his Township, and the office of County Treasurer from 1868 to 1872. Wilson Shewmake was educated in the private schools of Conway County, and at the early age of 18 years he began farming for himself. In 1862 he enlisted in the Federal army under Gen. Curtis; he served but a short time and was discharged for disability. He then went to Missouri where he married America Roswell, January 3, 1864. She was a native of Missouri, and a daughter of William and Elizabeth Roswell. In 1870 he returned to Arkansas and took up his residence in this county. He follows the occupation of farmer, at which he has been successful and now owns 120 acres of good land with seventy-five under cultivation. He is a member of the G. A. R, a Republican in politics, and both himself and wife are members of the Advent Church. To the union of this couple have been born twelve children, namely: Robert (married to Mollie Adams), Mary E. (married to A. J. Carter), Jesse (deceased), Alice (deceased), Susie (deceased), Henry (deceased), Lucy, Elbert, William (deceased), Oscar, Edgar (deceased), and Nora M.

John W. Skipper, planter of McLaren Town ship, is a native of North Carolina, where he was born July 19, 1853, his parents, Joseph and Louisa (Garnto) Skipper were also natives of North Carolina, from which State they immigrated to Conway County, Arkansas, in 1856. This couple were the parents of eight children, five of whom are living, and all reside in Arkansas. Mr. Skipper, Sr., departed this life in 1878, but his excellent wife, at the present age of 58 years, still lives and resides at the old homestead. She is a member of the M. E. Church. Mr. John Skipper, the subject of this sketch was reared in this county and attended the private schools here. At the age of 19 years began laying the foundation of his fortune by beginning life for himself as a farmer, and had at the start practically nothing. His success may be counted as the result of his own energy and perseverance, for he is now the prosperous owner of 400 acres of fertile land, with 175 under fence and cultivation, all stocked, many hogs and cattle, mules and horses. In 1881 our subject was united in matrimony to Nancy J. Adams, a native of this State. To this happy union have been born two children, Napoleon and the one which died in infancy. Mr. Skipper is a man who takes an active interest in everything for the good of his community; is quite active politically and affiliates with the Republican party. Mrs. Skipper is a member of the M. E. Church, South.

W. J. Stowers, Cashier of the Bank of Morrilton, was born in Georgia in 1846. He was the oldest in a family of ten children born to R. M. and Nancy A. (McCollum) Stowers, who were natives of Georgia and South Carolina respectively. This family removed to Mississippi soon after the birth of the subject of this sketch, and settled in Lafayette County, where he lived, following the occupation of a planter till his death in 1883. He was followed to his eternal home by his excellent wife in 1885. W. J. Stowers (the subject of this sketch) was reared on the farm till about 14 years of age, during which time he attended the country schools. In 1860 he secured an appointment of clerkship in the Department of the Interior at Washington; remained in the office one year; he then entered Bethel College at Macklemoresville, Tenn., where he was attending at the outbreak of the war, when he left his studies in response to his country's call for soldiers and enlisted in Company G, 11th Mississippi Regiment. He was in the battles of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines and the seven days' fight before Richmond; was in the Virginia and Maryland campaigns, and saw much hard fighting there. During the last year of the war was detailed to do clerical work for Gen. Whiting, who was commanding the Department of North Carolina. After the capture of Gen. Whiting, was with Gen. Bragg, at Washington, Ga., when the Confederate cabinet was finally dispersed After the passing away of the last scene of the great conflict, our subject returned home, but after a short time went to Memphis and secured employment as bookkeeper; followed this for two years and then went to Oxford, the county seat of his county, and engaged in mercantile business, which he followed till 1879, when he was elected to the Lower House of the General Assembly of Mississippi. After the expiration of his term, he re-engaged in planting, and followed that occupation for five years. In 1887 he came to Morrilton, Ark., and organized the bank of which he has since been the cashier. (For an account of this corporation see history of Morrilton.) Since Mr. Stowers' residence in Morrilton, he has become actively identified with that city's interest, participating in all measures for her development and growth. In politics he is a consistent advocate of the principles of Democracy, and is doing much to strengthen the cause of that party in Conway County. Among all classes and the old soldiers in particular, the "Captain," as he is familiarly called, is very popular. Socially, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic fraternities, and religiously he is a member of the Presbyterian Church (old school).

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Rev. W. C Stout , an Episcopalian clergyman of great and varied learning, was born in Greene County Tenn., in 1824. His parents, John and Mary Stout, came to Arkansas and settled at Fayetteville in 1830, where in connection with farming he held some government office. He was a most estimable citizen, a member of the M. E. Church, and he died in 1836, when our subject was a boy of but 12 years of age. Compelled now to do something towards his own maintenance, he secured a position in a store, near the line of the Indian Territory, and was there engaged as clerk for several years, and was often sent on business trips of importance, and some danger among the Indians, on the plains. From his earliest youth he was very studious, and during his leisure, while employed in the store, he was constantly engaged in reading and study. While still a youth (at, perhaps, the age of 18 or 20 years) he attended a series of meetings held in Fayetteville, by Bishop Leonidas Polk, who, seeing certain marks of intelligence and promise in the features of young Stout, sought his acquaintance and advised him to pursue his studies in a higher field. Bishop Polk promised and extended assistance with this advice, and in a short time our subject was enrolled as a pupil in Kemper College, Missouri. Here he pursued his literary studies, and after graduating entered the Theological College at Neshoto Mission, Wis., and commenced his studies for the ministry. After spending three years at the miss on he went to Alexandria, Va., where, after completing the required course, he was soon ordained as a Deacon by Bishop Mead, and later as a priest by his councilor, benefactor and friend, Bishop Polk, a brother of James K. Polk. Rev. W. C. Stout new returned to Fayetteville, and began his ministerial life by becoming Rector of the Episcopal Church at that place. In 1851 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jordan, a daughter of James E. and Elizabeth Jordan. Mrs. Stout's mother died when her daughter was an infant, and her father an extensive and successful merchant and planter, died about 1855. After Mr. Stout's marriage he resigned his charge at Fayetteville, and removed to Marshall County, Mississippi (Mrs. Stout's home), where they resided till 1858 when he returned to Arkansas and officiated for a time as Rector of Christ Church in Little Rock. He had previously (in 1856) purchased large tracts of land in Conway County, about ****000 acres, lying on both sides of the Arkansas River, on which he had placed a large force of s****ives to clear and improve. The tract on the south side of the river lies at the foot of the Petit Jean Mountain, and is now a magnificent plantation, and is still owned by Mrs. Stout. On this place there was a slight improvement, and it was the second place opened and settled west of, on the south side of the river. This land has been in continued cultivation ever since, and now, after nearly seventy years produces a bale of cotton to the acre every year. Mr. Stout soon removed his family to the plantation, who, on their arrival, introduced the first piano and pleasure carriage into Conway County. At the outbreak of the civil war Mr. Stout had over a thousand acres under cultivation, about equally divided, on both sides of the river, but on the threatened advance of the Federals, he was forced to leave his plantation and seek a refuge in Texas, where he remained till the close of hostilities. Mrs. Stout, with the family established a home in Little Rock, where they remained comfortably till Mr. Stout's return when they again took possession of their devastated plantation, and began to retrieve the wreck and loss which followed emancipation and the war. Their pleasant home at "Hawkstone" soon became one of the most beautiful in the Arkansas Valley, nestling at the foot of the Petit Jean Mountains, and stretching in level acres of corn and cotton for a long distance down the Arkansas River, including one of the most fertile tracts of cotton producing land in all the south Mr. Stout has selected a most admirable and picturesque situation for his home. The steamboat landing was practically at his front door, wh****am the rear the rugged heights of the Petit Jean formed a most pleasing background to a lovely view. Mr. Stout held services at Lewisburg and later at Morrilton, once a month, or as his health would permit, and to his influence was mainly due the organization of the Episcopalian Church at the latter place. While Mr. Stout was in Memphis, one Sabbath, a few days before the secession of Tennessee, he preached at Calvary Church, and in that service offered the last prayer for the President of the United States sent up to the throne of God, from Tennessee, till after the close of the war. In Little Rock, soon after the declaration of peace, at a sermon preached in Christ Church to a large congregation of both Federal and Confederate officers, as well as citizens of the city, he was the first Episcopal clergyman west of the Mississippi River to institute the change, and offered in the service of that day a prayer for the President of the United States. So we see that Mr., Stout was the last clergyman in Tennessee before the war, and the first west of the Mississippi, after the declaration of peace, to pray for the President of the united States. Mr. Stout was a most through scholar, an accomplished linguist of half a dozen tongues, and a man of most varied and universal general information. His correspondence with men of science, of letters and statesmen, was extensive, and his views, theories and plans were always held in great respect. A prolific and versatile writer, few subjects were left untouched by his pen, and all handled with ability and skill. A series of articles upon deepening the mouth of the Mississippi were pronounced soundd and feasible, and extensively commented upon and copied by the press of the United States. His faculties of memory and observation were remarkable, seldom forgetting any thing, and never failing to see everything that lay beside his path Quiet and concerted in the domestic felicity of an educated and brilliant wife, and the happy association of his children, he never sought political advancement and power, yet was often importuned by friends who knew his worth to allow his name to be used as a candidate for the office of Governor of the State and the United States Senate these solicitations were always firmly declined, and he lived in quiet retirement with his family till his universally regretted death, which occurred December 11, 1886. To the union with his excellent wife (who now occupies one of the most handsome residences in Morrilton) were born eight children, three of which died in infancy, and three others just on the threshhold of a promising career. Two only are living now, Thomas Percy, married to **** Wendel, of Tennessee, and Mary Irene, wife of G. P. Lane. William Jordan died **** 1883, aged 31 years. James Jo****re**** February 24, 1885, aged 30 years, and **** Polk, died February 15, 1883.

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T. P. Stout, merchant and planter, of the **** of M. E. Stout & Co., at Hawkstone, in Higgins Township, was born on that plantation in 1867. He is the only surviving son of a family of eight children born to the Rev. W. C. and Mary E. (Jordan) Stout. (See sketch of the life of Rev. W. C. Stout). Our subject was reared on the farm, attended school at Lewisburg and later at Starksville, Miss., for two years. He was recalled from the latter place by his father's death in 1886, and has since been mainly engaged managing his mother's estate. The firm of M. E. Stout & Co., which is composed of Mrs. M. E. Stout, G. P. Lane, a brother-in-law, and our subject, was organized January 1, 1890. They have a large store on their plantation, and are cultivating nearly 1000 acres of land. Mr. Stout was married March 28, 1889, to Miss Ida Wendel, of Brownsville, Tenn. They are the parents of one child, Arthur Wendel, born November 7, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Stout are members of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Stout is one among the many active and progressive young men of Morrilton, and stands high in the respect and estimation of its citizens. He is a director in the Morrilton Hedge Co., and actively interested in all enterprises that promise to advance the general good.

Wm. W. Stout, the competent Postmaster of Morrilton and a prominent planter of Gregory Township, was born near the locality in which he now resides, in 1852. He was the oldest in a family of three children born to James M. and Sarah J. (Ashmore) Stout, who were natives of Tennessee and Alabama respectively, and are, on both sides, members of pioneer families to this and Pope County Paternal grandfather, William, immigrated with his family to Pope County in 1842, and he at once became one of the influential citizens of that county. In 1850 he was elected County Clerk, and re-elected for three successive terms. After the war he was again appointed Clerk by Governor Murphy, and while serving in that office was assassinated November 5, 1866. He was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and had preached in Pope County since his settlement, and had become one of the best known and most highly respected citizens. His wife died in 1875. Maternal grandfather, Andrew S. Ashmore, came to Arkansas from Tennessee in 1838, and settled in Pope County, where he bought land and made extensive improvements. In 1849 this family removed to Conway County, and settled in Gregory Town ship. There Mr. Ashmore died in 1860, and was followed by his estimable wife in 1875. James M. Stout was reared in Pope County, where he resided till 1852, when he removed to Gregory Township in this county, and entered land, made improvements, and resided till his death, in 1875. He was married to Miss Ashmore in 1850, and this lady is still living. Mr. Stout was Postmaster at Old Hickory from 1868 till his death, and was for years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm, and had such educational facilities as was afforded by the common schools. He was united in marriage in 1870 to Miss Hattie M. Peck, a native of this State and county. At about the time of his marriage he entered a homestead, on which he lived but a short time, and then sold his claim and bought his present farm of 200 acres, on Point Remove Creek, two miles west of the present site of Hattieville. Here he has made most extensive improvements, and now has one of the best farms in Gregory Township, having 125 acres under cultivation, nearly all of which he has himself cleared, a handsome residence erected in 1887, and several tenant houses. Farm is well stocked, and the portions not cleared are still covered with good timber. Mr. Stout has always been quite active politically, and is consistent in his adherence to the principles of the Republican party, for which he has done much good in this county. Mr. Stout has had much experience in the management of postoffices having served almost continuously since 1875, when he was appointed to the office at Old Hickory. He served there till 1880, and was appointed to the office at Atkins, in Pope County. Here he served one year when he was appointed mail agent on the railroad. The next year he was reappointed to the office at Atkins and served till 1885. On May 14, 1889, was appointed to the office at Morrilton. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Stout have been born five children, named in order of birth: Henry M., Edwin D., Ella, William H. and Minnie Maud. Mrs. Stout holds membership in the Presbyterian Church. The village of Hattieville was named by Mr. Stout in honor of his wife Hattie. Socially Mr. Stout is a member of the Knights of Honor and of the Odd Fellows Galla Rock Lodge at Hattieville.

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Pleasant H. Spears an influential and successful planter of Griffin Township, was born in Bradford County, Tennessee, on March 3, 1836. His parents were John T. and Agnes (White) Spears, both natives of the same State, their parents being among the earliest pioneers to that locality. To the union of this couple were born nine children, all of whom are still living. John T., with his family, emigrated to Arkansas in 1839, and located in Carroll County, where he began a long life at agricultural pursuits. His excellent wife died September, 1882. He has always been a prominent man in the encouragement of schools and churches, and affiliates with the Republican party in politics. Mr. P. H. Spears, the subject of this sketch, received his education in the private schools of his county, and at the age of 20 years embarked in the life and occupation of farmer for himself. On October 7, 1858, he was united matrimonially with Sarah E. Ketchen, a native of Alabama. To this union have been born 13 children, named Sarah C., William P., James M., Henry S., Mary O., John T., Cornelius (deceased), Millie, Florence (deceased), Joseph B. The other four died in infancy. Our subject served in the Federal army during the war, under Gen. McNair, in Co. D, Second Arkansas regiment. He was in the battles of Limestone Valley; was in Missouri during Price's raid through that State; was at Lagrange, Tennessee, at the time of the surrender. He at once returned to his home, and began a peaceful life of husbandry. He has always been prominent in politics, and in 1873, represented Newton County in the lower house of the General Assembly. In 1884, after having made his home in Conway County, he was elected Sheriff, and served during 1884 to '86. He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, and has held nearly all the offices in Cleveland Lodge, No. 473, of which he is a member. Mr. Spears is an example of a self-made man; beginning, as he did with very little, he now owns 1120 acres of good land, and has the large tract of 550 acres under cultivation. All this is well stocked and improved. Mr. Spears is a popular and progressive citizen; he is one of the foremost spirits in any affair that tends to develop his country.

A. B. Simmons, a merchant and planter of Washington Township, was born in Marshall County, Mississippi, May 4, 1847. His grandparents on both sides were pioneers to Tennessee; his mother, a Miss Shewmake, and his father Edward Simmons, were both born in that State. They were the parents of six children; two only, Jesse, who lives in Pope County, and the subject of this sketch, are now living. Mr. Edward Simmons was an early pioneer to Arkansas, immigrating to Drew County, in this State, in 1849, and died in the fall of the same year. His widow married Mathew Haisty, and they were the parents of three children. He was a man of considerable energy, and she was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject received a fair common school and business education, and at his majority began working for wages. He was married December 27, 1874, to Miss Glass, a native of Arkansas, and a daughter of Dudley Glass. Mr. Simmons owns 520 acres of good land, and is quite extensively engaged in farming operations, and in connection has a business at Solgohachia, that shows a most satisfactory increase in trade. Socially he is a member of Springfield Lodge, A. F. and A. M. Politically he is a conscientious member of the Democratic party, and for four years was County Assessor. Mrs. Simmons is a member of the Advent Church. To the union of our subject and his estimable wife there has been born six children, named in order of birth as follows: Charles (deceased), Ida V., Ada D., Edward D., Jesse E. and William H. (deceased).

Wiley S. Scroggin, the subject of this sketch, owes his nativity to the State of Mississippi, but was brought to Conway County, Arkansas, when a child of six years of age by his parents, who were among the earliest settlers here. He was born April 8, 1833, and his parents, Henson and Malinda (Carpenter) Scroggin, were natives of Georgia and Mississippi respectively. They were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and seven are yet living. Mr. Scroggin, Sr., was a farmer by occupation, and emigrated from Mississippi to Arkansas in 1839. He settled in Conway County, where he entered land. He was a man who took quite an active part in building up schools, churches and society in those early days. He and wife were members of the Christian Church. Mr. Scroggin died November 16, 1860, and was followed to his eternal rest, twenty-seven years later, by his faithful wife, who died March 6, 1887. The subject of this sketch received a limited education at the common private schools of Conway County, and at his majority began life for himself, by engaging in the occupation of farming. In this he has been eminently successful, and now owns a fine tract of land, of 280 acres, with 125 acres under a high state of cultivation, which, equipped with stock and necessary farming implements, will make it one of the most desirable places in the northern part of the county. Mr. Scroggin has been twice married; to his first union in 1859, were born nine children, who were named, in order of birth, Dennis C., Sarah J., Malinda C., Martha E., Henson, Matilda C., James M., Wiley A., (deceased), and Robert F. He lost his wife by death, October 1878, and in 1879 he married his second and present wife, who was a native of Tennessee. To this union have been born two children, Minerva and William A. C. (deceased.) Mr. Scroggin is socially a member of the Masonic Lodge at Cleveland, No. 473, while he and wife hold membership and worship at the Christian Church.

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James Madison Scroggin, a venerable pioneer of Conway County, was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi in 1822, and was a son of Humphrey and Julia (Chaney) Scroggin, who were born, reared and married in Oglethorpe County, Georgia, from whence they removed to Lawrence County, Mississippi, and afterward to the Cherokee purchase in Holmes County, where they resided till the fall of 1834, when they immigrated to Van Buren County, Arkansas, where they made one crop and then removed to Conway County and settled in what is known as the "Nichols Neighborhood," in Nichols Township, among the canebrakes, about twenty-five miles from Lewisburg, which was the nearest post office and trading point. He was truly one of the sturdy and honest pioneers, and after a residence of ten years in Conway County, he (1845) removed to Dallas County, and from there to Sevier County about 1859; but he soon returned to Conway County, where he was called to his eternal home in 1862 at the age of over 80 years, and was the first to be buried in the family burying ground on the farm now owned by W. W. Scroggin. His wife died in Van Buren County in 1882, aged 71 years. Both were Primitive Baptists. Mr. Scroggin was a soldier in the war of 1812. His father was an Englishman and died in Georgia. John Chaney, the father of Mrs. Scroggin, died in Oglethorpe County, Georgia, a farmer by occupation. He was formerly of Maryland. J. M. Scroggin is the fifth of a family of eight sons and three daughters, all of whom lived to be grown and married. Mr. Scroggin came with his parents to Arkansas when about twelve years old, and never attended school of any consequence in his life. In 1843 he was united in marriage with Miss Samantha Stell, who is a native of DeKalb County, Georgia, born in 1823 and is still living. She is a daughter of Judge Robert Stell. (See sketch of M. L. Stell). This union resulted in the birth of eight children, five of whom survive, viz.: Emily C, the wife of James Trout; Eveline, widow of Duncan Buie (deceased); Selata A., wife of M. L. Ashbury; John K, and Roe Humphrey. In 1846 Mr. Scroggin settled nine miles northeast of Morrilton, where he improved a good farm, and made his home till about 1877, when he removed to his present farm, two and one half miles southwest of Centre Ridge. He has improved three good farms in Conway County and in early life was a great sportsman, having made many a successful chase after deer, bear, etc. He has witnessed many changes in the customs and conditions of the people of the county since his residence here. In his early recollection Indian moccasins and coon-skin caps were commonly worn. The mills in this part of the State were then very few and much of the corn was beat in a mortar or pestle. The country was then so sparsely settled that it required the assistance of all within a radius of twelve or fifteen miles to raise a log house. In 1872 Mr. Scroggin was elected Treasurer of Conway County, and was twice re-elected, holding that important office for six consecutive years. He is a prominent member of the Springfield Lodge, No. 127, A. F. & A. M.; also of the Royal Arch Chapter, and of the Council, in all of which he has held many of the important offices. Mrs. Scoggin is a long-standing and devout member of the M. E. Church, South.

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William W. Scroggin, prominent among those who are engaged in agriculture in Conway County, and a well-known and esteemed citizen of Union Township, was born in that part of Conway County now known as Nichols Township, in the year 1839, making him but three years the junior of his native State. His father, John C. Scroggin, was born in Georgia, January 2, 1817, and the mother, Disa McAlister, was a Mississippian by birth, and was born February 19, 1820. In 1834 Mr. Scroggin removed with his parents, Humphrey and Julia (Chaney) Scroggin, to VanBuren County, Arkansas and the year following to Conway County. His first marriage occurred in 1838, to the mother of William W She died March 29, 1847, and August 17th Mr. S. was married to Sarah Black. His death occurred March 28, 1864, after a residence in Conway County of nearly forty years. He was a prominent member of the Springfield Lodge of A. F. & A. M., No. 127, and of the Missionary Baptist Church. (For ancestral history, see sketch of J. M. Scroggin). Daniel McAlister, the maternal grandfather of our subject, removed from Mississippi to Van Buren County with the Scroggin family. There he and wife both died not many years after. They were among the earliest families of that part of Arkansas. William W. Scroggin, the only surviving member of a family of one son and two daughters, was reared in the wilds of Conway County, and has witnessed the county develop from a wilderness to its present high state of improvement, and his school days did not exceed three months. January 31, 1861, he married Martha Reynolds, a daughter of Jonas and Elizabeth Reynolds, who were natives of North Carolina, but removed from Georgia to Conway County, Arkansas, in 1856, but in 1863 removed to Bates County, Missouri, where they both died. Mr. Reynolds was a farmer and brickmason, and both he and wife were Primitive Baptists. Mrs. Scroggin was born in Georgia, and is the mother of eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: John J., Orville O., James C., Dora, Martha and Damel. Mr. Scroggin has resided in different localities, but about twelve years ago settled on his present farm of 240 acres, (about 135 acres under cultivation) five miles southwest of Springfield. He began life with nothing of this world's goods, but by his industry, economy and good management has obtained a good home. In 1861 he joined Capt. Morgan's company of Col. Glenn's Regiment of Arkansas Infantry, in which he served about two years, participating in the battle of Prairie Grove. The remainder of his service was in Company A, Third Arkansas Cavalry of Gen. Steele's command, as a sergeant, participating in the engagement at Jenkins' Ferry and numerous others till the cessation of hostilities, when he was discharged at Lewisburg, after about four years of active service for the cause of the Union. Mr. Scroggin has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for twenty-five years, and both he and wife are members of the Christadelphian Church.

Thomas W. Scroggins, another esteemed citizen and industrious farmer of Lick Mountain Township, was born in what is now Nichols Township, in 1856. His parents were John and Mary M. (Inglehight) Scroggins. Mr. Scroggins was born in Mississippi about seventy-one years ago, and when a young man came to Conway County, where he was married about 1856. Here he spent his remaining years, dying in 1866. He was a farmer by occupation, and a man who was well-liked and well known. Mrs. Scroggins is now living with her youngest son at Hackett City, and is the mother of nine children, six of whom are living, viz: T. W. (our subject), Jane, the wife of Hugh Sewell, of the Indian Territory, Adeline, Sarah S., now Mrs. Columbus Floyd, of Hackett City, Julia A., wife of Thomas Burnett, of the Indian Territory, and Frank, of Hackett City. T. W. was reared a farmer boy with a very limited country school education, as the early demise of his father threw the main support of the family on his shoulders. In 1875 Mr. Scroggins married Miss Rosana Ree, who was born in 1859. Her parents were James and Anna Reed. (See sketch of William Reed) Mr. Scroggins has four sons. He farmed as a tenant till 1881, then purchased his present farm, which had about twelve acres cleared. He now has a good farm, in a beautiful locality, two miles northwest of Centre Ridge. Politically, Mr. S. is a Republican. He and wife are consistent members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Scroggins' mother died in 1875.

Rev. F. O. Stobaugh, a minister of the Christian Church and blacksmith and woodworkman at Centre Ridge, was born in Van Buren County in 1845, and is a son of Rev. John J. and Sarah A, (Rogers) Stobaugh, who were born and reared in Tennessee, and from there they removed to Mississippi and about 1825 immigrated to Arkansas and settled in the wilderness in what is now Van Buren County, where Mrs. Stobaugh is still living at about the age of seventy-four years, and for many years a devout member of the Christian Church. Mr. Stobaugh improved a fine farm in Van Buren County, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was a man of noble character, self-educated, and for twenty- five years was a Christian minister. In 1861 he was made chaplain in Capt. Jennings' company of the Tenth Arkansas, of Confederate troops, but was afterward made Lieutenant and entered the service in the field, but at the battle of Shiloh, (his first battle) he fell mortally wounded and died at Corinth on April 26, 1862. He was a Master Mason, and was a son of Edmond S. Stobaugh, who was of German ancestry and died in Conway County, a farmer by occupation. George Rogers, the maternal grandfather of our subject was a Tennessean by birth, but was an early settler of Van Buren County, Arkansas, where he died before the war. F. O. Stobaugh is the fifth of five sons and four daughters. His early life was spent on a farm, with a country school education. In the spring of 1863 he enlisted in the Union army in Capt. Williams' company of the Third Arkansas Cavalry, and operated in Arkansas till the summer of 1865. when he was discharged at Lewisburg, after having taken part in many severe skirmishes. His marriage occurred in 1866, to Martha J. Maddox a native of Van Buren County, and a daughter of James and Elvina Maddox, who were also pioneers of Van Buren County, where they both died. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Stobaugh, two sons and five daughters of whom survive. Mr. Stobaugh continued his residence in his native county till 1872, when he removed to Conway County and settled in the western part of Lick Mountain Township, where be improved a good farm, and in 1878 he settled in the woods where Centre Ridge now is, being the first settler in the town. Here he has since continued his trade and also carries on farming quite extensively, being the owner of two fine farms of 380 acres. He is one of the most practical and ideal farmer, of Conway County. In, 1868 he became a member of the Christian Church and on August 25, 1873, was ordained for the ministry, and has since been regularly in that work of salvation, being the present pastor in charge of the Centre Ridge Church and Liberty Church in Van Buren County. He is a member of Napier Post, G. A. R. Mrs. Stobaugh and eldest daughter are also members of the Christian Church in good standing.

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E. J. Stobaugh, prominent among the farmers and stock raisers of Lick Mountain Township, was born in Scott County, Arkansas, in 1851, and is a son of Edmond S. and Jane (McDaniel) Stobaugh, who removed in a very early day from Tennessee to Van Buren County, but afterward removed to Scott County, thence back to Van Buren County, and from there they came to Conway County, where Mrs. Stobaugh departed this life in 1889. Mr. Stobaugh is now a resident of Centre Ridge, and is about 68 years of age, and is a prominent member of the Christian Church. His wife was also. Mr. Stobaugh has been a farmer and blacksmith by occupation. He served in the Federal army as a blacksmith in the Third Arkansas, which operated in Arkansas and Missouri. He is a member of Napier Post, G. A. R., at Centre Ridge. His father was Rev. John J. Stobaugh. The subject of our sketch was reared on a farm in the different counties in which his father resided, and his education was limited to the country schools. In 1867 he married Miss Mary Williams, a native of Arkansas, and a daughter of Leroy and Martha A. (Hill) Williams, who were natives of Franklin County, Tennessee, but in about 1844 removed to Conway County, but afterwards resided a few years in Van Buren County, then returned to Conway County, where Mr. Williams died prior to the war. Mrs. Williams married Mr. Bumpus Brinkley, and now resides in Franklin County. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Stobaugh, of whom three sons and five daughters survive. Mr. Stobaugh lived in Van Buren County for about three years after his marriage, when he settled on his present farm, then with about fifteen acres cleared. He now has about 150 acres improved, 280 acres in all, making one of the best upland farms in the township. His property is all the result of hard toil and good management. Mr. Stobaugh is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Sons of Veterans (Mason Camp.) He and Mrs. Stobaugh are members of the Christian Church.

James Stobaugh, another son of Edmond S. and Jane (McDonald) Stobaugh, is also a progressive and enterprising farmer of Lick Mountain Township, and was probably born in Scott County, Arkansas, in April, 1846, being the eldest of the children now living. The others are E. J.; Nancy, wife of Phela Beavers, of Van Buren County; Sarah, the wife of Neelham Flowers, and Frank. James grew to manhood on a farm with but little advantages for schooling. In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company B of the First Arkansas Infantry of the Union army, and after about six months service at Helena and St. Louis, was discharged at the latter place. He then came home and joined Company B of the Third Arkansas Cavalry, and operated in Central Arkansas till the close of the war, when he was discharged at Lewisburg. He received a gun shot wound in his right shoulder at Lewisburg. He was married the year the war closed (1865) to Miss Sidney Williams, a daughter of Leroy and Martha Williams. (See sketch of E. J. Stobaugh). Mrs. Stobaugh was born in Conway County, and is the mother of five children, of whom one son and three daughters are living. Mr. Stobaugh improved a good farm in Van Buren County, where he made his home till about 1876, when he settled in the woods three and a half miles northwest of Centre Ridge, where he has a fine farm of 120 acres, about 65 acres of which is under a fine state of cultivation, all of which he has accumulated by the sweat of his brow. Politically he is a Republican, and is a member of the Napier Post of the G. A. R. He and wife are devout members of the Christian Church.

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George W. Stripling, a prominent agriculturist and stock raiser of Lick Mountain Township, is a native of Bradley County, Arkansas, born in 1857, and is a son of William Wiley and Mariah (Mince) Stripling. The father was born in Alabama and the latter in North Carolina in 1830. Their marriage occurred in Alabama about 1849, and they at once removed to Bradley County, Arkansas, where Mr. Strippling spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1863. His father, Wiley Stripling, removed from Alabama to Bradley County about 1849, and died there about the close of the war. He was a farmer and a Methodist. Grandfather John Mince was a farmer and stock raiser in Alabama, where he died. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Stripling married W. K. Davis of Bradley County, and in 1869 removed to Van Buren County, and about five years after came to Conway County and lived near Centre Ridge till his death in October, 1883. Mrs. Davis is now living with a daughter, Mrs. Manley Willis, of Van Buren County. Mrs. Davis is a member of the Christian Church, and is the mother of eleven children, ten by her first husband of whom George W. is the sixth, and of whom four are living, viz.: Margaret E., widow of William D. Rhodes (deceased); John J.; Harriet, wife of Jesse Mahan; George W.; Susan C. (by last husband). Mr. Stripling never attended school more than two months. Was reared on a farm, and since 1874 has resided in Conway County, where he was married in 1877 to Miss Mary Mahan, a daughter of James and Emily Mahan. Mr. Mahan was born in Kentucky, but about thirty years ago removed from Tennessee to Conway County, where he still resides. He is about 66 years old, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Mahan died during the war. Mrs. Stripling was born in Tennessee and is the mother of eight children, four living. Soon after his marriage Mr. Stripling settled in the woods near where he now resides, where he has improved a good farm, being the owner of 240 acres of land near Centre Ridge, all of which he has obtained by industry and economy. He is active in all public enterprises, is a Republican in, politics, and he and wife are devout members of the Christian Church.

A. T. Stover, one of the leading farmers of Lick Mountain Township, is a native of Lawrence County, Ala., born 1850, and is a son of Lorenzo Dow and Amanda M. (Barnes) Stover, who were also natives of Lawrence County, where Mr. Stover still resides, aged about 58 years. His wife died in 1881, a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Stover is a farmer and mechanic, and for some years was engaged in the mill business. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a son of Abraham Stover, a Virginian by birth, but married in Tennessee, and an early settler of Lawrence County, Ala., where he spent his remaining years, dying just prior to the late war. He was a farmer and miller, and served in the war of 1812. Grandfather Thomas Barnes was also an early settler of Lawrence County, Ala., where he died a farmer. A. T. Stover is the second of a family of six sons and three daughters. He was reared on a farm, educated at the country schools, and in 1872 married Mary E., a daughter of John and Serilda Stephenson, who were natives of Morgan County, Ala., and of Kentucky, respectively. They were married in Morgan County, where they still reside. Mr. and Mrs. Stover are the parents of five children. After his marriage, Mr. Stover resided in Morgan County till 1883, when he came to Conway County and farmed as a tenant till 1887, when he purchased his present farm of 160 acres, about eighty-five of which are under cultivation. It is located in a fine valley two and one-half miles east of Lick Mountain Postoffice. Mrs. Stover is a Methodist. Politically Mr. Stover is a Democrat. The other members of the family are Colorado, the wife of James M. Rhodes; Lorenzo Dow, and James W., both of Van Buren County; Daniel W., of Alabama, and Elva Lear, now Mrs.-J. I. Rogers, of Texas.

Dr. Edward D. Stein, a physician and surgeon at Centre Ridge, was born in Carroll County, Mo., in 1840, and is a son of Major James and Charlotte (Casner) Stein. The former born in Baden-Baden in 1818, and the latter in Brussells, Belgium, the same year. Both came with their parents to the United States, Mr. Stein at 15 and wife at 12 years old. They married at Harrisburg, Penn., and from there they removed to North Carolina, thence to Northwest Missouri, and Mrs. Stein died in Carroll County, Mo., in 1872. Mr. Stein died in Andrew County in 1873 or 1874, Both were Catholics. Mr. Stein was a captain in the Black Hawk war, and served under Gen. Sterling Price, as a major in the Mexican war, and fought at Buena Vista, Cerro Gordo, etc. His father, Daniel Stein, was a merchant at Harrisburg, Penn, where he died. Grandfather John Casner was a farmer in Northwest Missouri, where he died. Dr. Stein is the sixth of seven children, the doctor and one sister (Buena, now Mrs. George Callahan, of Logan County, Ark.) living. Dr. Stein was educated principally at New Orleans and Mobile, and at about 15 began the study of medicine with an uncle, Dr. Wm. Glaze, of Maryville, Mo, and graduated from the New Orleans Medical College; practiced in Louisiana a few years, and about 1872 took a course at Ann Arbor, Mich., and continued practice in Louisiana till 1886, when he removed to Northwest Arkansas, and in 1887 to Conway County, and since January, 1890, has been located at Centre Ridge. He served nearly all through the Southern ****y in various capacities -in the field, and doing hospital service, etc. Was in the battles of Oak Hill and Lexington, Mo., Sugar Creek and Elk Horn, Ark., and Corinth and Iuka, Miss. He married in 1881 to Josephine Prichett, and has one son and one daughter. He is a Democrat in politics and has been Worshipful Master of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 557, A. F. & A. M., in Louisiana, and Noble Grand of Goodwin Lodge (Louisiana), No. 325 I. O. O. F., and is a member of the American Medical Association. Mrs. Stein is a Methodist.

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Esquire J. C. Steele, a popular citizen and one of the substantial farmers of Union Township, was born in Marshall County, Miss., in July, 1843. His father, Robert N. Steele, who was a son of Ninnian Steele who was a farmer of Alabama, where he died about the year 1851, was a native of Alabama, but was married in Tennessee to Hannah Hervey, who was a South Carolinian by birth. In 1849 Mr. Steele journeyed to Texas to look for a more suitable location, and while there died of that dreaded disease, cholera. In 1860 the family removed to Conway County, where the mother died the following year, 1861. She was a faithful member of the Methodist Church for many years. Esquire Steele is the youngest but one in a family of ten children. He was reared to manhood on a farm, receiving his education at North Mt. Pleasant (Miss.) Male Academy. He came with the family to Conway County, and engaged as a clerk at Portland till July of 1861, when he joined Company A, Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry, but after the reorganization at Corinth, in 1862, he served in Company D, Twenty- first Arkansas, as sergeant; and fought at Iuka, Corinth, Port Gibson, Champion and Black River Bridge, etc.; and, after the fall of Vicksburg, he joined the Tenth Arkansas Cavalry, and was with Gen. Price on his celebrated raid through Missouri. He was captured at Kansas City, but soon after made good his escape. He surrendered with his command at Jacksonport, Ark., in June, 1865, after four long years of conflict. His first marriage occurred in Arkansas County in 1866, to Mary Davis, a daughter of John and Hamilton Davis, She was a native of Mississippi and died in 1868. Mr. Steele was again married in 1873. this time to Miss Lizzie, a daughter of Jonathan and Frances Norton, who died in Yell County when Mrs. Steele was a small child. She was born in Tennessee. To this latter union have been born five children, of whom three daughters survive. Mr. Steele returned to this county in 1869, and in 1877, purchased his present farm, which then had about ten acres cleared. He now has about sixty acres under cultivation, 120 acres in the entire farm, which is the fruits of his own labor. He served three years as Justice of Peace, his last term expiring in 1886. He is a member of Howard Lodge, No. 253, A. F. & A. M., at Plummerville, and he and wife are Methodists in good standing. Politically, Mr. Steele is a Democrat and is ever ready to assist in any worthy enterprise.

Frank Seaman, merchant and agent for the Singer Sewing Machine at Morrilton, was born in New York, in 1851; was the youngest in a family of four children born to J. M. and Susan (Seaman) Seaman; parents natives of New York, where father died before the memory of his son. Our subject attended the schools of that locality till the age of 18 years, when he went to Wisconsin and engaged in farming; remained in that State about four years, and then moved to Rockford, Ill., and also followed farming. In 1875 came to Arkansas and settled at Forrest City, St. Francis County, and worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1879, married Miss Susan Suratt, a native of Forrest City, and daughter of an old settler in that county. Soon after marriage he came to the western part of the State, and later, settled in Benton County, where he also followed the work of carpenter, doing contract work altogether; located at Rogers, and made that county his home for over five years, and then, in 1885, came to Morrilton, where he has since resided, He at once began work as a carpenter, which he followed for some time. In October, 1889, opened his present grocery store; has a good and neat store and fair business. In the beginning of 1890, in partnership with J. Poindexter, secured the agency for Conway and Perry Counties for the Singer Sewing Machine. Mrs. Seaman started a millinery store soon after her arrival here, and now does a good business. Mr. Seaman owns the property where he does business and resides.

Frank Snyder, an active business man of Morrilton, was born in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1857; was the oldest in a family of five children born to John and Amelia (Engelmeier) Snyder; father was born in Baltimore, Md., and mother in Germany; father was a business man in Pittsburg, engaged in grocery trade. Subject attended the common schools of Pittsburg till 1874, when he began learning the confectionery business and trade. Completed his trade and remained one year working journey work, and then in 1878 came to Arkansas and settled at Morrilton. Here he engaged as clerk for Irving Bro., with whom he remained for seven years, and then engaged in business for himself, carrying a stock of general merchandise. In 1888 he closed out his business and engaged as clerk for Massey, White & Co., with whom he has since remained. In 1884 bought a business house on Railroad avenue, and three lots on the corner of Division and Church streets, where he is about to erect a handsome residence. Was married in 1886 to Miss Maggie Hample, from Montana, and daughter of Michael Hample, a farmer of St. Vincent, this county. To this union has been born one child, a girl, named Emma. Family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Snyder is a self-made man, coming to Morrilton when the town had but two stores. He has seen man changes here. Beginning as clerk, by frugality he acquired the means to engage in business for himself, and we predict that the future will find him among the substantial merchants of his adopted home.

Dr. W. A. C. Sayle. Among those who are deserving of creditable mention in this work, none are more worthy than the subject of this sketch. Dr. Sayle was born in Robertson Co., Tenn., in September, 1835, being a son of Dr. Cornelius W. and Lucinda M. (Adams) Sayle, who were also natives of Tennessee, the father having been born in 1810 and the mother in 1813. After their marriage they lived in Robertson County till our subject was quite a lad, when they removed to DeKalb County, where they lived till 1850, when they removed to Platt County, Missouri, where Mr. Sayle died in 1866. His wife is still living, now with our subject. The senior Dr. Sayle was a self- made man. In early life he studied medicine in Nashville, Tenn., and made the practice of medicine his profession the remainder of his life with marked success. He was a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. and of the F. and A. M. He also had two brothers who were successful physicians. Their father was William Sayle, a North Carolinian by birth, but a pioneer of Robertson County, Tenn., where he became a well to-do farmer and spent the latter years of his life, dying there over 80 years of age. He was of Irish ancestry and his wife of Welsh. She also died in Robertson County, Tennessee. The Doctor's grandfather, James Adams, was also a native of Robertson County, Tennessee, where he lived till about 1844, when he removed to Missouri, where he and his wife both died. He was a farmer by occupation and was of Irish and Scotch descent. But to return to our subject. He was the second of a family of two sons and two daughters, himself the only one living in Arkansas. He attended the country schools in Tennessee, and after the removal of the family to Missouri he attended William Jewel College, at Liberty, Mo., after which he studied medicine with his father for some time, when he entered the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louisville, Ky., from which institution he graduated with honor in 1859, and after spending a few days at his home in Missouri he sought for greener fields, and was soon located in Conway County at Old Lewisburg, and when he saw that Morrilton was to be the metropolis of Conway County, he removed to that place, where he has a beautiful home, situated on the bluff in the south part of the city, where it has a commanding view. He also owns a fine farm of 338 acres in the Arkansas river bottoms and considerable business property in Morrilton. In 1879 he erected the first brick building in Conway County. He is now the oldest and most prominent practicing physician of Morrilton, having practiced in this vicinity for over thirty years, although for the past few years he has been somewhat retired from active practice. He has quite recently established himself in the drug business, under the firm name of Sayle, Metzger & Company. In 1861 he joined Col. McIntosh's command of Confederate troops as assistant surgeon, in which capacity he served till after the fall of Vicksburg, when he spent about nine months at home. He was then made surgeon of Col. Hill's regiment and served in that command till the close of the war, having operated in Missouri, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi. Politically he was reared a Whig, but cast his lot with the Democratic party on reaching his majority. Since about 1859 he has been an influential member of the Lewisburg Lodge, A. F. and A. M., No. 105, having held nearly all the offices. For about ten years, at different periods, was Worshipful Master. He is also a member of the Lewisburg Chapter No 56. In that order he has served as High Priest, Captain of the Host, etc. He is Medical Examiner in the Morning Star Lodge, K. of H., No. 2197, at Morrilton. He has been twice married. First in January, 1861, to Sophronia, daughter of Col. Benjamin T. Howard, who came from Tennessee to Conway County in 1827. Here he spent the remainder of his life as a prominent farmer and merchant, dying in 1865. From 1833 to 1835 he served as Sheriff of Conway County. Mrs. Sayle was born in Conway County, where she spent all her life. Her death occurred January, 1874. She was a lady of good Christian disposition and was the mother of three children, one of whom (a son) survives. In December, 1875, the doctor married Mrs. Emma M. Murray, nee Jefcott. She was born in Missouri, where her parents, who were natives of England, died when she was a little girl. She was soon after taken to Austin, Tex., where she was reared and educated. The Dr. and Mrs. Sayle are both devout members of the Missionary Baptist Church, the former for thirty years.

W. N. Sandlin. Among the progressive and popular merchants of Morrilton is the subject of this sketch. He began his mercantile career when 20 years old (1871) as a clerk for D. L. Downs of Hartsell, Ala. After a clerkship of about two years he became a partner, and continued as such till 1882, when he came to Morrilton, and formed a partnership with a Mr. Speaks, who died after about two years, since which time the business has been conducted with marked success and ability. Mr. Sandlin carries a stock of general merchandise to the value of about $15,000, with an annual business of about $75,000. Besides his business he owns a beautiful residence on Moose street, which he occupies; a fine residence near the convent; also, other real estate in the city and eighty acres of unimproved land six miles from Morrilton, all of which is the result of his own industry and good financiering. He owes his nativity to Decatur, Ala., where he was born in 1851, being the eighth of a family of four sons and five daughters. He was reared on a farm, with a country education; hence he is a self-made man. He was married in 1884 to Miss Mamie Gooch, a daughter of Albert and Margaret Gooch, the latter of whom is still living at Montgomery, Ala. Mr. Gooch departed this life at Tuscaloosa, Ala., where Mrs. Sandlin was born. Mr. and Mrs. Sandlin are the parents of two daughters, and are active members of the Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Sandlin is a Democrat He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Hermion Lodge, No. 28, of which he was once Prelate. His parents were James and Elizabeth C. (Ferguson) Sandlin, who were natives of South Carolina, the former born- about 1809 or 1810, and the latter, 1813. When young they went to Alabama, where they married and spent the rest of their lives, dying at Hartsell-Mr. Sandlin in 1887, and his wife in 1888. Mrs. Sandlin was a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Sandlin was a farmer by occupation. Their parents all died in Alabama.

C. C. Straughan, a notary public, and part owner of the Morrilton, Solgohachia and Cleveland Telephone line, is a resident of Morrilton. He is also engaged in the mercantile business at Cleveland, under the firm name of Straughan Bros. Mr. Straughan is a native of Marion County, in what is now West Virginia, and was born in 1850, being the eldest of a family of four sons and six daughters. Was raised to manhood on a farm, and since 9 years old has lived in Conway County, receiving his education at Old Lewisburg, under the tutorage of the Rev. I. L. Burrow. After completing his education he taught school for about one year, after which he spent about three years as a clerk for A. C. Wells. He was then engaged in the mercantile pursuit at Lewisburg for a few years, the firm being Straughan & McClung. Mr. Straughan then followed farming until 1882, when he removed to Morrilton, where he again engaged in the mercantile business, which he continued with success till June, 1889, when he retired from business at that place, but in February prior had engaged in other business with his brother at Cleveland. Mr. Straughan now owns and operates a good farm of 200 acres, six miles north of Morrilton. He also owns a good residence in the suburbs of Morrilton, where, he now resides, and other good residence property, and an interest in one of the finest business blocks in town, erected by Straughan & Brooke, in 1889. He is a Democrat in politics, and holds membership in the orders of I. O. O. F., A. F. and A. M, and of the K. of H., the latter Morning Star Lodge, No. 2197. He is at present, and for several years has been Secretary of the Lewisburg Lodge of Masonry, No. 105 His marriage occurred in 1874 to Miss Mary Barley, a daughter of George and Sarah Barley, who were early settlers of Pope County, where Mrs. Barley died when Mrs. Straughan was quite small. Mr. Barley is a German, and is still a resident of Atkins Pope County, a planter by occupation. Mrs. Straughan was born in Pope County, and is the mother of three sons and three daughters. Mr. Straughan's father, Peter C. Straughan, was born in Northumberland County, Virginia, in 1824, and married in what is now West Virginia, to Mary M. Tucker, a native of Ohio. After their marriage they removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and from there to Kentucky (Campbell County), where they lived till 1859, when they immigrated to Conway County, Arkansas, and settled a few miles north of the present site of Morrilton, where Mr. Straughan died in 1883. He was a successful farmer during his life. He fought bravely nearly all through the campaign of Tennessee. During the civil war was with Gen. Van Dorn, till the latter's death, after which he fought under Gen. Longstreet. At the last Nashville fight Mr. Straughan received a severe wound, which left him a cripple for life. His father was of Scotch descent, and died when Peter C. was a boy.

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Dr. John J. Stephens, one of Springfield's promising and successful young physicians and surgeons, was born in Blount County, Alabama, in the year 1864, and when about seven years of age was brought by his father to Conway County, Arkansas, where he grew to manhood on a farm, receiving his education at some of the best schools of Conway and Boone Counties, and at Quitman, and in 1884 began the study of physic with Dr. D W. McPherson, of Springfield, after which he attended the medical department of the Vanderbilt University of Nashville, Tennessee, from which institution he graduated in 1886. He then spent one year in the practice of his chosen profession with his father, then two years at Cleveland, and in 1888 located at Springfield, where he has an extended practice. In 1886 he was united in marriage with Miss Sallie Bell, a daughter of Samuel Bell, a former resident of South Carolina, but who died in Van Buren County, Arkansas, when Mrs. Stephens was but a child. Two children are the result of their union. Mrs. Stephens is a native of Arkansas. Politically Dr. Stephens affiliated with the Democratic party; is Senior Deacon of the Springfield Lodge, No. 127, A. F. & A. M., and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Dr. Benjamin M. Stephens, the father of Dr. John J., is also a prominent physician of Conway County, having practiced continually since 1867; and since 1852, has also been regularly engaged in the ministry, being licensed by the Missionary Baptist Church in that year, and ordained in 1854. He is a native of Lumpkin County, Georgia, and was born in 1829, being a son of John and Francis R. (Griffith) Stephens, who were born in Pendleton and Greenville Districts, South Carolina, respectively. The former was born in 1807 and the latter in 1814. They removed to Georgia in 1829, where Mr. Stephens died in 1850. Mrs. Stephens died in Conway County, Arkansas, in 1885. Rev. James Stephens, the father of John Stephens, was a Virginian by birth, but died in Lumpkin County, Georgia, in 1861, after fifty years in the Missionary Baptist ministry. He was of Irish ancestry. Benjamin Griffith, the maternal grandfather of Dr. B. M. Stephens, was born in Greenville District, South Carolina, and died in Gilmer County. Georgia, in 1862. He was a practical surveyor, and was of Welsh descent. In 1862 Dr. B. M. Stephens joined Company B of the Twenty-ninth Alabama Infantry, and after six months' service the army was reorganized and he was placed in an independent company in the Third Confederate Alabama, in which he served till near the close of the war. In 1854 he was Surveyor of Pickens County, Georgia, and in 1855 and 1856 represented that county in the State Legislature. He has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. since 1858. He is now of Springfield Lodge, No. 127. In 1857 Dr. Stephens removed to Blount County, Alabama, where he continued to reside until 1871, when he immigrated to Conway County, Arkansas, where he now resides, and is now living with his fourth wife, who was formerly Martha Mallet. The doctor was first married in 1849, and the second time in 1857, this time to Melissa McCan, who was the mother of Dr. J. J. Stephens. She was born in Georgia, and died in 1867 in Blount County, Alabama. She was a daughter of James and Rebecca McCan, who were natives of North Carolina.

William H. Smith, another prominent farmer of Union Township, owes his birthplace to Phillips County, Arkansas, where he first saw the light of day in 1854. His parents, Dr. Jonas Dudley and Viola L. Clindening) Smith were born near New Orleans, La., and in Sumner County, Tennessee, respectively. Dr. Smith was a man of more than ordinary ability and intelligence. He graduated in the medical profession at New Orleans, married his first wife in his native State, and after the death of his wife, he removed to Phillips County, Arkansas, where he wedded the lady who became the mother of the subject of these memoirs. The family resided in Phillips County till 1860, when they removed to Des Arc, in Prairie County, where they lived till 1869, when they removed to Woodruff County, where Dr. Smith was called to his last resting place the same year, 1869, after a successful career in the medical profession of a good many years. He served for a time in the Confederate army as examining surgeon. He was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Methodist Church. Soon after the death of her husband, Mrs. Smith removed with her family to Jackson County, and in 1873 came to Springfield, where she has since resided. Mrs. Smith is a devout member of the M. E. Church, South, and is a daughter of the late Anthony Bledsoe Clindening, who was one of the pioneers of Phillips County, Arkansas. He afterward removed to Jackson County, where he spent his remaining years. dying there during the war, a farmer by occupation. W. H. Smith is the second of three sons and two daughters, three of whom are living, viz.: Alice, now the wife of Hon. W. S. Hanna, Anthony C. and W. H. The last named was educated at Des Arc and at the country schools. He came with his mother to Springfield, and in 1876 married Miss Mary E. Cargile, a daughter of Robert L. and Hannah Cargile, who were among the early settlers of Conway County. Mr. Cargile was a prominent merchant at Springfield, where he died in 1879. Mrs. Cargile still resides at Springfield, a much respected lady. Mrs. Smith was born near pringfield, and is now the mother of two sons and four daughters. Mr. Smith was engaged in the grocery business at Springfield for about four years after his marriage, but since then has been engaged in farming and is now the owner of a fine farm of 340 acres near Springfield, about 150 acres of which are under cultivation. He began life with nothing of this world's goods, and what he now possesses is the result of his own toil and efficient management. Mr. Smith is a Democrat in politics, and a worthy member of the A. F. and A. M., Springfield Lodge, No. 127, having served that Order as Junior and Senior Warden, and Senior Deacon. Mrs. Smith is a devout member of the M. E. Church, South.

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Miles L. Stell, senior member of the firm of Stell, Willbanks & Co., general merchants at Springfield, was born in Guimmwick County, Georgia, April 29, 1831; son of Judge Robert and Winnie (Gentry) Stell, natives of Georgia and South Carolina respectively, who lived in Georgia till 1835, and then came to Arkansas, and located in Conway County, on a small improvement on Cypress Creek, two miles from the present site of Springfield, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Stell dying March 6, 1860, and his wife was called to her long home three years before, in 1857. Both had been for a time members of the Methodist Church. Mr. Stell and brother, Dennis Q. Stell, were the first settlers in that vicinity, and through their influence many others came from Georgia, and the neighborhood became known as the "Georgia Settlement," a name that clings to it to the present time. Judge Stell was a prominent farmer and blacksmith, and from 1854-56 served as County Judge. He was a son of Dennis Stell, a Georgia farmer. Our subject is the youngest of eight children, four sons and four daughters. He was reared on the farm, in the then thinly settled regions of Conway County. School facilities were very poor, and his education was mainly secured at home. In 1852, was married to Lucinda, daughter of Hiram Willbanks, whose sketch appears on another page of this book. She was born in Georgia, and died after a wedded life of ten years, leaving four children, of whom three are now living, Dr. Christopher C. Stell, Fidelia, wife of J. W. Bolton, and Robert B. Stell. Our subject married the second time to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Mary Moses, early settlers of Pulaski County, where Mr. Moses died a good many years ago. His widow married again and removed to Conway County and died. Mrs. Stell was born in Pulaski County and is the mother of ten children, nine of whom are living. Mr. Stell has since lived in the neighborhood where his father first settled, and is the owner of the old homestead, and owns over 700 acres of good land, all accumulated by his own labor and industry. From about 1873 he has run a grist mill and cotton gin on his farm. Soon after the war, he and a brother engaged in commercial business at the mouth of the Cadron Creek, and again, about 1879-80-81, he was merchandising at Springfield. His present business was established about 1887, and has since grown into a very profitable trade. They carry a full stock of general merchandise and do an annual trade of about $15,000. In 1861, Mr. Stell joined Company I, Tenth Arkansas Infantry; was in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements; was in Port Hudson during the siege, when he was captured and paroled, and then came home. In politics he is a consistent Democrat, and has been all his life. He joined the Order of A. F. and A. M. in 1861, Springfield Lodge, No. 127. Family have been members of the M. E. Church for many years. The subject of this sketch is a member of one of the oldest families in Conway County, Mr. Stell, Sr., coming here when this section was a veritable wilderness. Many changes mark the course of the years from that day down to the present time, and the descendants of those old pioneers may take this satisfaction to their hearts, that their ancestors laid the foundation of the present prosperity here by their good example, peaceful ways and industrious lives.

Elbert S. Smith, a highly esteemed citizen of the pleasant community of Washington Township, this county, is actively engaged in the occupation of farming. He owns a good farm of about 160 acres, well improved, fenced and stocked; he is also the owner of a good house and lot in the village of Springfield, this county. Both he and his estimable wife are worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which religious denomination he also holds the office of Elder. The subject of this sketch was born in Alabama on the 24th of October, 1849; was one of the sons of eight children born to Samuel L. and Mary G. (Dean) Smith; the parents were both natives of South Carolina, where the father followed the occupation of farmer, and resided till 1856, when he immigrated to Arkansas and settled permanently in Bradley County. In 1863 he enlisted in the Confederate army in the company of Captain Jack Martin, serving in the Home Guards till the end of the war. His death occurred in May, 1877, but his estimable wife is still living, and resides in Bradley County, and is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Our subject received his education in the private schools of Bradley County, and on arriving at man's estate began farming for himself, which occupation he has successfully followed since. In 1872 he married Ellen McCauley, on November 14. She is a native of this State, and was born in 1851. To this union have been born five children: William, Eudora, Ollie, Georgie and Grover, the last of whom is dead. Mr. Smith may be spoken of as one of the enterprising citizens of his community, and one who takes an active interest in all things for its good.

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Thomas A. Sloan is one of the representative planters of Washington Township, Conway County, Arkansas; was born in Gibson County, Tennessee, in 1841, July the 27th. His parents were Robert and Frances (Sloan) Sloan, and to them were born three other children, all of whom are living at the present time but one. In 1853 our subject, with his mother, immigrated to Arkansas and located in Yell County, where Mrs. Sloan resided till her death, which occurred on August 12, 1859. She was for a long time a member of the M. E. Church, South. The subject of this sketch was principally educated at the schools of Yell County, and at his majority began to lay the foundation of his own fortune. In 1861, at the outbreak of the late war, he enlisted in the Confederate army under Gen. Price, in Company D, Fifteenth Arkansas Regiment, and participated in the battles of Elkhorn, or Pea Ridge, Ark., Corinth, Iuka and Vicksburg, Miss. At Vicksburg he was captured and paroled July 4th, whereupon he returned home. On October 14 of same year (1863) he entered the Federal army under Gen. Steele, and was in engagements on the Ouachita River, this State, and at the time of the surrender was at Lewisburg, from which point he went home and resumed his occupation as farmer. November 10 of 1863 he married Frances Arnold, a native of this State, and to this union have been born three children, Rufus M. and Emily (twins), and Sarah (deceased). In July, 1870 he lost his excellent wife, and married the second time to Margaret McCalister in August of 1871; this lady unfortunately dying, he married again in November, 1872. to Mary A. Pody, a lady who also claims Arkansas as her native State, and to this union was born one child, James E., who died. and was followed in August by his mother. In February 27, 1876, Mr. Sloan married again to Mamie Thomas, and to this union were born three children, named John T.; William F. and Georgie W. This lady died February 15, 1881, when our subject married Sarah Campbell in August 15, 1881, and the fruits of this union was one child, M**** E**** Mr. Sloan's farming operations have been attached with success, and he now has a well stocked farm of 160 acres, with 65 under a high state of cultivation. In matters of local interest and improvement Mr. Sloan is always found to willingly lend a helping hand, and is one of the representative citizens as well as a self-made man of Washington Township. He holds membership in the Christ Delphian Church. On August 3, 1887, he met with further bereavement by death in the loss of his most excellent and estimable wife.

George Stubbs, a planter residing on the Petit Jean Mountain, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, April 10, 1855; he is a son of John C. and Mary M. (Flowers) Stubbs; father a native of Ohio, born in 1825; mother of Maryland, born 1827. They were married in Ohio in 1843, and are the parents of twelve children-six sons and six daughters-two of whom are dead. George, the subject, is the second son, John W., James, Samuel, Allen, Joseph, Caroline, Mary E., Artimissee, Ella, Catherine (deceased) and one died unnamed. Father enlisted in the Federal army in 1864, and served until the close of the war. Mother is a member of the Methodist Church. They are both living and reside in Ohio. Our subject was married in Delaware County, Ohio, on May 1, 1881, to Miss Jennie Jarvis, a daughter of William and Leah (House) Jarvis. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Stubbs have been born three children -Glyndon, Alta and Elby. Mr. Stubbs emigrated from Ohio to Kansas in 1885, and from Kansas to Arkansas in 1889. He located on the Petit Jean Mountain, and soon secured an interest in a sheep ranch with Mr. H. T. Hannaford; he is also farming quite extensively. Socially he is a member of Knights of Pythias fraternity, and politically he is a Democrat. Mrs. Stubbs' parents are also natives of Ohio, where father was born about 1822, and mother in 1823. They were married in Ohio, and are the parents of nine children- four sons and five daughters-four children now living: Jennie Eliza, Semanthia and William. Parents are now living in Union County, Ohio, and are members of the Christian Church.

O. L. Slaughter, a worthy citizen of Washington Township, was born in Lafayette County, Tenn., December 28, 1841; his father, Edward, and mother were natives of North Carolina, and were the parents of a large family of children, seven of whom grew to majority, and of whom our subject is the youngest. Edward, Sr., was both a farmer and mechanic by occupation. He emigrated from North Carolina to Tennessee in 1838, and located in Hardeman County, and from there to Fayette County, where he remained five years, and died while on a trip to Texas. Mrs. Slaughter lived till 1867, when she died in this State. These worthy people were both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject was educated in Tennessee, and at the age of 16 years began for himself by working at farm labor. In 1855, he, with his mother, came to Arkansas, where he has since resided. He married Mary C. Fowler, a native of Tennessee, in 1856. To the union was born three children-Martha A. (married), Lizzie L. (deceased), Marian C. (deceased). Mrs. Slaughter died in 1864, and in 1873 our subject married again to Mary A. Schrienscher, a native of Mississippi. She died in 1876, and in 1888 Mr. Slaughter married Mrs. Phedonia A. Peteete, **** Munn, a native of Tennessee. Our subject follows the occupation of a planter, and owns a fine farm of eighty acres, of which sixty are under a high state of cultivation. Mrs. Slaughter is a member of the Baptist Church, and our subject is active in all things directed toward the improvement of the county.

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Dr. Wm. M. Scarborough, a successful and prominent druggist of Morrilton, was born in Sumpter County, S. C., in 1839; he was the oldest of a family of three children born to W. H. and M. E. (Miller) Scarborough. Parents were natives of Tennessee and South Carolina, respectively; father was an artist and followed portrait painting. He died at Columbia in 1871, but mother is still living, and resides at Spring Hill, S. C. Our subject was reared and educated in Columbia, at the South Carolina College, and in 1859 commenced the study of medicine at the University of Nashville, (Tenn.), and graduated there March, 1861. He at once enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Company of "Columbia Grays," and made the campaign of Virginia, participating in all the engagements of General Lee's army. After an examination at Richmond, in 1862, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the Fourteenth South Carolina Regiment, in General Lee's army, and was in all the engagements of those troops, till, the end of the war. He then returned to Columbia, where he at once engaged in the practice of his profession, and where he remained till 1872, when he came to Arkansas and located at Lewisburg, where he at once opened a drug store, and carried on business till 1880, when he removed to Morrilton, and erected the building in which he has since conducted his business. He carries a complete stock of about $2000 of everything in the line of a first-class drug store, and with his knowledge and skill has acquired a large and successful patronage. Mr. Scarborough was married in 1871 to Miss Effie Metzger, of Little Rock, and to this union have been born six children, all boys, three of whom are dead. Wm. M. died at the age of 2 years, in 1875, and George H. died in infancy, at the same time; Du Bose; Frank E.; Andrew, died at the age of three years; Martin Audley. The family are members of the Episcopalian Church, and Mr. Scarborough is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Hermion Lodge, No. 28. In 1881 he erected a pleasant residence at Morrilton. In 1889 he purchased forty acres on the summit of Petit Jean Mountain, where he has erected a summer residence, and where he spent the summer of 1889, and from the enjoyment and comfort of his family there, he hopes to spend the summers of the future.

J. F. Summerhill, one of the leading planters of Point Remove Township, Conway County, was born in North Carolina October 24, 1833. His parents, Wilkerson and Margaret Summerhill, were natives of North Carolina and South Carolina, respectively. To this worthy couple were born seven children, six of whom are living. From North Carolina Mr. Summerhill, Sr., and family moved to Georgia in 1839, where they remained for twenty years, and in 1859 immigrated to Alabama; the next year then went to Louisiana, where they made their home till 1870, when they came to Clark County, Arkansas, and made their home till he was called to his eternal home in February, 1881. He had been preceded to that haven of rest by his wife, who had died in 1858. They had both been active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Our subject was reared on the farm, and obtained a such limited education as the country schools afforded, and at his majority began for himself, by working at farm labor. On November 24, 1856, he married Mary Adams. She was a native of Alabama, and four children were the result of this union, one of whom (William) died October 13, 1877. Mrs. Summerhill died August 4, 1886, and on October 3, 1889, he was married to his present wife, Bettie Hughes. Mr. Summerhill is an earnest advocate of schools, and has served as director of his district, and of churches, of which he is a member of the Methodist denomination. He was a soldier in the late war, serving under the Confederate flag. Was in the battles of the Red River campaign in Louisiana, and many minor skirmishes; was in the State of Louisiana at the surrender, and from there at once returned home and resumed his farming operations, which occupation he has diligently followed since.

A. L. Steward of Cleveland, one of the representative men of that section, is engaged mainly in. the milling industry there. He has a good steam grist, saw and planing mill and cotton gin, which he conducts in addition to his farming operations, and is also proprietor of the hotel at Cleveland. Since his residence in Conway County, which dates from 1877, when he came here from Desha County, he has proven by his industry and activity and his interest in all things to be for the good of Cleveland; that he has the advancement of that place at heart. He was married in 1873 while in Desha County to Mattie Todd, a native of Tennessee, and they now have an interesting family of seven children, who are named in order of birth: William L., Ella M., Alexander T., Claude, John, Eugene C., and Walter H. Our subject was the son of James and Mary (Gardner) Steward, and was born in Tennessee December 11, 1840. His parents were natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively, and were the parents of a family of nine children, of which our subject is the seventh. His father was a mechanic by occupation. Both he and wife were members of the Presbyterian Church. The family are of English and Irish descent. The father died in Tennessee in 1859, and the mother in 1857. The subject of this sketch received such educational advantages as that time afforded in the common schools of Tennessee, and at the age of 15 years, began life for himself by engaging in farming, and followed that till 1871, when he came to Arkansas and located in Desha County. After two years he went to Jefferson County for one year, when he returned to Desha County. He married there in 1873, as previously stated, and followed farming then till 1877, when he permanently located in this county. Mrs. Steward is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.